Artists

ACME Biographies

Florence Grippe

Florence Grippe

(1910-2010)

Training
Educational Alliance, N.Y.C -1932-34: drawing & painting
Works Project Adminstration, N.Y.C. -1934-38: drawing, painting & sculpture
Henry Street Settlement, N.Y.C. – 1939-41: pottery with Wm. Soini
92nd Street YMHA -1940: Sculpture & drawing with Peter Grippe

Teaching Experience
1947-54: United Art Workshops of Bklyn Neighborhood Houses: drawing, painting, sculpture & puppetry
1951-57: Brooklyn Museum Art School: Design, underglaze painting, pottery & glaze making
1947 (Summer Session): Black Mountain College, North Caroline: Sculptor’s assistant to Peter Grippe

Exhibitions
1941: New York Council for the Arts – N.Y.C
1945: American Museum of Natural History
1945: Orrefors Galleries, N.Y.C
1946: America House, N.Y.C
1947: Sweden House, N.Y.C
1947: Rena Rosenthal Gallery, N.Y.C
1948: National Art Club – N.Y.C
1948: Laural Gallery, N.Y.C
1949: American Museum of Natural History
1949: Sidney Janis/Betty Parson Galleries (Collaborative Exhibition auction)
1949: Roko Gallery, N.Y.C
1950: Willard Gallery, N.Y.C
1951: 9th Street Exhibition of the New York avant garde artists
1951: Brooklyn Museum Art School
1951: Voloshin/Cox Gallery – Key West Florida
1952: Morris Gallery, N.Y.C.
1953: The Atelier, N.Y.C
1955: Brooklyn Museum Art School
1957: Zabriskie Gallery, N.Y.C
1957: New School for Social Research, N.Y.C
1957: Pyramid Gallery, N.Y.C
1958: Downtown Community School, N.Y.C
1962: Boston College
1974: Guild Hall, Southhampton, L.I.
1978: Provincetown Art Association & Museum, P’town, Ma.
1979: Guild Hall, Southhampton, L.I. (Art Auction)

Portrait Commissions
1969: Doris Brewer Cohen, Lexington, Ma.
1970: Signora Attilio Revere, Locarno, Switzerland
1970: Dr. Luis Martinez, Valencia, Spain
1971: Eduardo Franco Sola, Rome, Italy

Collections
Guild Hall, Southampton, L.I. – “McGovern Mural”, 1972 (46 Long Island artist’s paint-in)
Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University: 1979, Portrait of Doris Brewer Cohen on extended loan.
Private Collections: Jacques Lipchitz, James Johnson Sweeney, Grace Borgenicht, Michael Freilich (Roko Gallery), Marian Willard (Willard Gallery), Chris Ritter (Laurel Gallery), Louis Nevelson, Mitchel Siporin and others.

Bibliography
New York Times Magazine Section – July 25, 1942
New York Times Magazine Section – September 22, 1947
New York Times Magazine Section – December 7, 1947
The Daily Star Review of Nassau County – March 1949
The Brooklyn Daily Eagle – November 11, 1951
Glamour Magazine – April 1952
Brooklyn Museum Art School Bulletin – Spring 1956
New York Times – August 19, 1972
The Boston Sunday Globe – August 25, 1978
The Daily Transcript, Needham – 7/19/79
Who’s Who of American Women
Who’s Who in America

Oliver Chaffee

chaffee, oliver

Oliver Chaffee
(1881-1944)

Education
Art Students League, with Hawthorne
New York School of Art, with Henri and Chase
Detroit Fine Arts Academy
Academie Julian

Select Exhibitions
Detroit Art Institute, 1908, 1933, 1946
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, 1912
Armory Show, 1913
Salon d’Automne, Paris, 1913, 1924
Art Institute of Chicago, 1919, 1928, 1932, 1942
Provincetown Art Association and Museum
Brooklyn Museum, 1927
Museum of Modern Art, 1933
Worcester Museum of Art
Everson Museum of Art, 1977
Corcoran Gallery of Art, 1986
Taft Museum, 1991

Selected Collections
Smithsonian Institution
Corcoran Gallery of Art
Kalamazoo Institute of Arts
Provincetown Art Association and Museum
Provincetown Town Hall

Biography
Oliver Chaffee is considered to be one of the most important and influential early modern painters and art teachers in what is thought to be the oldest art colony in the United States, Provincetown, Massachusetts.

Chaffee’s early paintings were clearly influenced by his training in New York with Robert Henri, as well as his training in Paris at the Academie Julian, where he must have come in contact with the Fauvist work of Matisse and Derain. Chaffee’s work from the 1910s represents some of the earliest and most accomplished “Fauvist” work done in the United States.

Three of Chaffee’s paintings, all Fauvist landscapes, were part of the famous Armory Show of 1913 in New York. His work was well received and compared to the works of Matisse, Picasso, Hartley, Marin, and Maurer. A review of the show compared Chaffee’s work with that of Maurer, and complimented the “effect of intense sunlight” in his work.

Ray Parker

RAY PARKER (1922-1990) 

Ray Parker

Born: August 22, 1922, Beresford, South Dakota
Died: April 14, 1990, New York, New York

Education: BA, 1946 University of Iowa; MFA, 1948, University of Iowa

TEACHING

1946-48- Graduate Assistant, State University of Iowa
1948-51- Instructor of Painting and Design, University of Minnesota
1953- Visiting Artist, Academy of Art, Memphis, TN
1955-90- Professor of Art, Hunter College, New York
1959- Guest Artist, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
1970-71- Guest Critic, Columbia University School of Arts, New York
1974- Guest Critic, Bennington College, Bennington, VT

SOLO EXHIBITIONS

1949- Rochester Art Center, Rochester
1950- Walker Art Center, Minneapolis
1953- Paul Kantor Gallery, Los Angeles
Memphis Academy of Art, Memphis
1954- Louisville Art Center, Louisville, KY
1955- Union College Gallery, Scenectedy, NY
1956- Paul Kantor Gallery, Los Angeles
1957- Martin Widdifield Gallery, New York
1959- University of Southern California, Los Angeles
1960- Galerie Lawrence, Paris
Galerie Neufville, Paris
Kootz Gallery, New York, also: 1961, 1962, 1963, 1966
1961- Galleriea dell’ariete, Milan
Bennington College, Bennington, VT
Dwan Gallery, Los Angeles, also 1962
The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
1965- Dayton Art Institute, Dayton, OH
1966- Gertrude Kasle Gallery, Detroit, also 1970
Washington Gallery of Modern Art, Washington, DC
1967- San Francisco Museum of Art, San Francisco
University Art Museum, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
1970- Molly Barnes Gallery, Los Angeles
Fischbach Gallery, New York, also: 1973, 1974
Quay Gallery, San Francisco, also 1972, 1974
1971- School of Visual Arts, New York
1974- Berenson Gallery, Miami
Elaine Benson Gallery, Bridgehampton, also 1980
David Berger Gallery, Pittsburgh
Portland Center for the Visual Arts, Portland, OR
1975- American University, Washington, DC
1976- Susan Caldwell Gallery, New York, also: 1977, 1980
1977- University of Maryland, College Park, MD
University of Texas, Austin
1978- The Billiard Room Gallery, Cambridge
1979- Betty Cunningham, New York, also 1980
Phillips Collection, Washington, DC
1980- Gloria Luria Gallery, Bay Harbor Islands, FL, also 1986
Joe Grippi Gallery, New York
1981- College of Cortland, State University of New York, Fine Arts Center, Cortland
1983- Carl Solway Gallery, Cincinnati
1986- The Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown
1990- The Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Art Gallery, Hunter College, New York
1993- Galleria Peccolo, Livorno

1994- Galleria Milano, Milan
1997- Washburn Gallery, New York, also: 1999, 2000, 2004, 2007

Ray Parker2

GROUP EXHIBITIONS

1949- “Second Biennial Exhibition,” Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN
1950- “New Talent Exhibition,” The Museum of Modern Art, New York
“Annual Exhibition of Contemporary Painting,” The Whitney Museum of
American Art, New York
“American Painting Today,” The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
1951- Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH
1952- “Annual Exhibition of Contemporary Painting,” The Whitney Museum of
American Art, New York
1954-56- “Stable Annual,” Stable Gallery, New York
1956- “Vanguard 1956,” Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN
Poindexter Gallery, New York
1957- “American Painting Exhibition,” Minneapolis Institute of Art, Minneapolis, MN
1957-58- “International Exhibition of Painting,” traveled throughout Japan (U.S. representatives
selected by The Museum of Modern Art)
1958- “Annual Exhibition of Contemporary Painting,” The Whitney Museum of American
Art, New York
1960- “60 American Painters,” Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN
1961- “Abstract Expressionists and Imagists,” The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
“Recent Painting and Sculpture,” The Museum of Modern Art, New York
(traveled in the United States October 1961 to June 1963)
1962- “Art Since 1950,” Seattle World’s Fair, Seattle, WA
The Gifford and Joann Phillips Collection, UCLA Art Galleries, Los Angeles, CA
1962-63- Biennial, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
“Three Former Iowans,” Des Moines Arts Center, Des Moines, IA
“Biennial,” University of Illinois, Urbana, IL
1963- “Toward a New Abstraction,” The Jewish Museum, New York
Corcoran Gallery of Art Biennial, Washington, D.C.
“Black and White,” The Jewish Museum, New York
“Annual Exhibition of Contemporary Painting,” The Whitney Museum of American Art,
New York
1963- “New Directions in American Painting,” Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University,
Waltham, MA
1964- “Carnegie International,” Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, PA
“Post Painterly Abstraction,” Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, CA
Other venues: Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN
Art Gallery of Toronto, Toronto, Canada
“67th Annual Exhibition of American Painting,” Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
“American Art Since 1950,” Brandeis University, Waltham, MA
“Painting of a Decade 1956-64,” The Tate Gallery, London, England
“Black, White and Gray,” Wadsworth Athenaeum, Hartford, CT
“Selections from the Guggenheim Museum,” Italian Pavilion, Venice Biennial
1965- “Carnegie International,” Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, PA
“Annual Exhibition of Contemporary Painting,” The Whitney Museum of American Art,
New York
1968- “The Art of the Real: USA 1948-1968,” The Museum of Modern Art, New York
Other venues: Grand Palais, Paris, France; Kunsthaller, Zurich, Switzerland;
The Tate Gallery, London, England
1969-70- “Annual Exhibition of Contemporary Painting,” The Whitney Museum of American Art,
New York
1971- “Young Artists of the ’50’s,” The Museum of Modern Art, New York
1972- “Color Forum,” University of Texas, Austin, TX
“Annual Exhibition of Contemporary Painting,” The Whitney Museum of American Art,
New York
1973- “The Biennial Exhibition of American Art,” The Whitney Museum of American Art,
New York
1975-77- “American Art Since 1945,” from the collection of The Museum of Modern Art
Other venues: Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, MA; Toledo Museum of Art,
Toledo, OH; Denver Art Museum, Denver, CO; Fine Arts Gallery of San Diego,
San Diego, CA; Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, Dallas, TX; Joslyn Art Museum,
Omaha, NE; Greenville County Museum, Greenville, SC; Virginia Museum of
Fine Arts, Richmond, VA
“Three Former Iowans,” Museum of Art, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
“Color as Language,” sponsored by the International Council of The Museum of Modern
Art; Other venues: Museo de Arte Moderna, Bogota, Colombia; Museo de
Arte de Sao Paulo, Brazil; Museo de Arte Moderna, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil;
Museo de Bellas Artes, Caracas, Venezuela; Museo de Arte Moderno, Mexico
City, Mexico
1976- “Abstract Expressionists and Imagists: A Retrospective View,” The University of
Texas, Austin, TX
“Drawing Today in New York,” sponsored by Rice University, Houston, TX
“Artists and East Hampton, A 100-Year Perspective,” Guild Hall, East Hampton
1977- “New in the ’70’s,” University Art Museum, Austin, TX
“A Miscellany of the 1960s,” Susan Caldwell Gallery, New York
1978- “New York, The State of Art, The New York School,” State Museum, Albany
1979- “Art in America After World War II,” The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
1984- “Artists at Hunter 1950-1965,” Hunter College Art Galleries, New York
“Then and Now,” Elaine Benson Gallery, Bridgehampton
1986- “After Matisse,” The Queens Museum, Flushing
Other venues: Chrysler Museum, Norfolk, VA; Portland Museum of Art,
Portland, OR; Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach, FL; The Phillips
Collection, Washington, D.C.; Dayton Art Institute, Dayton, OH;
Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, MA
1987- “39th Annual Purchase Exhibition,” American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters,
New York
1989- “Abstract Expressions: Painting and Sculpture of the 1950’s and 1960’s,” Vanderwoude
Tananbaum Gallery, New York
“Three-Man Exhibition with Dan Christensen and Robert Goodnough,” Gloria Luria
Gallery, Bay Harbor Islands, FL
“Before the Field – Paintings from the Sixties,” Daniel Newburg Gallery, New York

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Statements by the Artist

“Student, Teacher, Artist,” College Art Journal, Vol. 8, Fall, 1953, p. 27
“Direct Painting,” It Is, Spring, 1958, p. 20
“Intent Painting,” It Is, Autumn, 1958, pp. 8-9
“Is there a New Academy?” Art News, Vol. 58/6, September 1959, p. 38
Catalogue of American Collection, The Tate Gallery, London, England, 1978

Books

Robert Motherwell and Ad Reinhardt, Modern Artists in America, No. 1. Wittenborn &
Schultz, New York, 1950.
“American Abstract Artists,” editors. The World of Abstract Art, George Wittenborn,
New York, 1957.
Bernard Friedman, editor. School of New York. Grove Press, New York, 1959.
Barbara Rose. American Art Since 1900, A Critical History. Praeger, New York, 1967.
Irving Sandler. The Triumph of American Painting: A History of Abstract Expressionism.
Praeger, New York, 1970.
Irving Sandler. The New York School. Harper & Row, New York, 1978.
Mary Fuller McChesney. A Period of Exploration: San Francisco 1945-1950.
Oakland Museum, Oakland, California, 1973.

Periodicals

“Exhibition at Widdifield Gallery,” Art News, Vol. 56, November, 1957, p. 56.
J. Schuyler, “New Untitled Oils at Widdifield,” Art News, Vol. 58, March, 1959, p. 10.
H. H. Arnason and Herbert Read, “Dialogue on Modern U.S. Painting,” Art News, Vol. 59/3,
May, 190, pp. 32-36.
William Rubin, “Younger American Painters,” Art International, Vol. 4, January, 1960, p. 30.
Irving Sandler, “New York Letter,” Art International, Vol. 4, January, 1960, p. 30.
“Ray Parker,” Art News, Vol. 60, April, 191, p. 46.
G. Schoenenberger, “Expositions A Milan: Raymond Parker,” Art International, Vol. 5,
August, 1961, pp. 77-78.
“Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum: American Abstract Expressionists and Imagists,” Kunstwerk,
Vol. 15, November, 1961, p. 59.
Lawrence Campbell, “Parker Paints a Picture,” Art News, Vol. 61, November, 1962, p. 40.
Gerald Nordland, “Show at the Dwan Gallery,” Kunstwerk, Vol. 6, November, 1962, p. 67.
Thomas B. Hess, “Phony Crisis in American Art,” Art News, Vol. 62, Summer, 1963, p. 59.
Max Kozloff, “Exhibition at Kootz,” Arts Magazine, Vol. 39, January, 1965, p. 48.
“Neue Abstraktions” Kunstwerk, Vol. 18, April, 1965, p. 121.
L. Picard, “Interview mit Raymond Parker,” Kunstwerk, Vol. 18/7, January, 1965.
Barbara Rose, “The Second Generation: Academy and Breakthrough,” Artforum, Vol. 4,
September 1965, pp. 58-63.
Bruce Glaser, “The New Abstraction” Art International, Vol. 10, February, 196, p. 41.
Hilton Kramer, “Art: 2 Men’s Dazzling Abstractions,” The New York Times, January 31, 1970.
“Ray Parker, Fischbach Gallery,” Artforum, April, 1970, p. 72.
L’Arte Moderna No. 111, Vol. XIII, pp. 28, 99, 118.
Hilton Kramer, Review, The New York Times, January 16, 1971.
Mary Fuller, “Was There a San Francisco School?”Artforum, January, 1971, pp. 46-53.
Alfred Frankenstein, “Praise Where it Is Due,” San Francisco Chronicle, February 17, 1972.
Barbara Rose, Review, New York Magazine, Vol. 6, No. 11, March 12, 1973.
Benjamin Forgey, “Parker’s Power,” The Washington Star, November 4, 1979.
John Russell, Review, The New York Times, November 9, 1979.
“The Virtue of Solitary Action, de Kooning, Parker, Francis, McNeil” ART\WORLD,
October 20, 1979
Michael Findley, “Ray Parker,” Arts Magazine, Vol. 55, No. 2, October, 1980, p. 3.
“Dialogue: Conversations with Ray Parker and Doug Ohlson,” Arts Magazine, Vol. 56,
No. 8, April, 1982.

PUBLIC COLLECTIONS

Akron Art Institute, Akron, OH
Albany Institute of History and Art, Albany
Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo
The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, CT
American Academy of Arts and letters, New York
American University, Watkins Gallery, Washington, D.C.
Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL
Bell Art Gallery, Brown University, Providence, RI
Childe Hassam Foundation, New York
Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH
Dayton Art Institute, Dayton, OH
Des Moines Art Center, Des Moines, IA
The Fort Worth Art Museum, Fort Worth, TX
The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles, CA
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Hayden Gallery, Cambridge, MA
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Miami-Dade Junior College Art Gallery, Miami, FL
Milwaukee Art Center, Milwaukee, WI
Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minneapolis, MN
Minnesota Historical Society, St. Paul, MN
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
The Museum of Modern Art, New York
New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans, LA
Philadelphia Museum of Art, Philadelphia, PA
Princeton University, The Art Museum , Princeton, NJ
Portland Museum of Art, Portland, ME
Rice University, Rice Museum, Houston, TX
Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, San Francisco, CA
The Tate Gallery, London, England
University of Iowa Museum of Art, Iowa City, IA
University of New Mexico, University Art Museum, Albuquerque, NM
The University of Texas Art Museum, Austin, TX
Vassar College Art Gallery, Poughkeepsie
Wadsworth Athenaeum, Hartford, CT
Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN
The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

ray parker 3

BIOGRAPHY

Originally from South Dakota, Ray Parker entered the University of Iowa in Iowa City in 1940; he earned his MFA in 1948. From 1948 to 1951 he taught painting at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. During the 1940s his paintings were heavily influenced by cubism. In the early 1950s, however, Parker became associated with the leading abstract expressionists of the day, including Mark Rothko and Willem de Kooning. Parker soon began to simplify and refine his works realizing that through abstraction, and color his paintings could convey and express emotion.

Like Piet Mondrian, Stuart Davis and Jackson Pollock, Parker was a fan of jazz music; and his interest in Jazz, combined with his interest in abstract expressionism, led to his improvised painting style. Parker was also a great admirer of the painter Henri Matisse and he looked to this artist’s work for inspiration in terms of color and form, especially in his paintings of the 1970s and 1980s. By the late 1950s, he taught at Hunter College in New York City and he developed a singular style of painting that focused on intense color and simple geometric shapes. He was represented by the Samuel M. Kootz Gallery, one of the leading contemporary galleries in New York City during the late 1950s through the mid-1960s. At that time the Kootz Gallery represented important living artists such as Pablo Picasso, Pierre Soulages, Hans Hofmann, Zao Wou Ki as well as Ray Parker.

He is best known by his work of the late 1950s early 1960s called his Simple Paintings. These paintings are characterized by discreet cloudlike forms of clear, and intense color set against a white or an off-white background. Parker’s paintings utilizing this method of stacked, clearly colored lozenges and floating forms are straightforward and basically geometric in shape.

 

Haynes Ownby

Haynes Ownby
1929-2001

Education:
Southern Methodist University, B.A.
Hans Hoffman School
University of Texas at Austin, M.F.A.

Awards:
Pollock-Krasner Foundation
Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Foundation
Hans Hoffman Trust
Richard A. Florsheim Art Fund

Selected Exhibitions:
Dallas Museum of Fine Art, 1950, 1963
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, 1954
James Gallery, 1955 (solo)
Contemporary Art Museum, Houston, 1965
Laguna Gloria Art Museum, 1978 (solo)
Huntington Gallery at University of Texas, Austin, 1979
500 Exposition Gallery, Austin, 1981 (solo)
Art Center, Waco, Texas, 1984 (solo)
Copenhagen City Gallery, Denmark, 1993
Schoolhouse Center, Provincetown, 1999 (solo), 2001 (solo)
Cape Museum of Fine Arts, 2001 (retrospective)

Selected Collections:
Provincetown Art Association and Museum
Cape Cod Museum of Art

Commentary:
Haynes Ownby was a student of Hans Hoffman and spent much of his professional life in Provincetown. Born in Texas, he was attracted to Provincetown’s vibrancy and casualness. Ownby, after completing a BA in Art and English at Southern Methodist University, went to New York to study with Hans Hoffman. He was one of the original twelve members of the James Gallery and was elected treasurer in 1952. After completing his MFA at the University of Texas at Austin in 1973, Ownby moved to Provincetown year round. Unlike most Provincetown painters, his abstract style is characterized by primary colors and the use of grids of squares. He is well known for creating and exhibiting an interactive art game, Kruztrax ©. Ownby received many grants and awards during his life and was a devout Buddhist. He died at age 71 in Provincetown.

Biography:

Haynes Ownby acknowledged that his most important visual artistic influences were other artists and their work. Those he credited were: Henri Matisse – with whom he shared his date of birth and an affinity for color, Piet Mondrian –whose canvases taught him to appreciate the ability to create depth in two dimensions, Hans Hofmann –with whom he studied from 1952 to 1956, and Myron Stout –his close friend and mentor. Ownby also drew inspiration from music, and he considered rhythm to be one of the most significant and unique aspects of his work.

Ownby’s work has been exhibited at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, the Dallas Museum of Fine Art, the Cape Cod Museum of Art, and at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum. He has been the recipient of grants from the Pollock Krasner Foundation, the Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Foundation, and the Hans Hoffman Trust. The most recent solo museum exhibition of Ownby’s work was in 2001 when the Cape Cod Museum of Art mounted a retrospective exhibition with Gregory Harper as curator.

Haynes Ownby was born in Dallas, Texas on Henri Matisse’s 60th birthday, December 31, 1929 and has worked as an artist ever since. In 1950, he “got serious about painting” and painted a number of abstract paintings one of which was accepted in the Texas Annual Competition at the Dallas Museum of Fine Art. That encouragement convinced him he was on the right track, and he showed in other shows at the Dallas Museum in 1951 to critical acclaim.
He received a B.A. from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, an M.F.A. from the University of Texas at Austin and studied with Hans Hofmann in New York and Provincetown for four years. Although it isn’t apparent in Ownby’s painting style, he regards Hofmann as the single most important influence on his life and work.
After Dallas, he lived in Manhattan and Provincetown for 5 ½ years, then Europe, Taos, back to Dallas, Manhattan again, Houston, Austin, and Provincetown.
His primary interest is abstract painting because, he says, “abstract painting does not represent another reality but is, in itself, a reality.”
Ownby is a teacher of art and has constructed art classes for the past five years at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum Art School. He says, “I go beyond color theory to concentrate on color practice, which is painting.” In the fall of 1999, he began teaching at the Provincetown International Art Institute.
Ownby’s painting is represented in the permanent collections of the Dallas Museum of Art, the El Paso Museum of Art, the Cape Mueum of Fine Arts, the Provincetown Art Association and Museum, AT&T, and in private collections in New York, Provincetown, Truro, Boston, Florida, Ohio, Arkansas, Texas, Arizona, California, and Italy. He received grants from the Florsheim Art Fund in 1996 and 1999.
In the summer of 1999, he had a one-man show at the Schoolhouse Center in Provincetown. He will show there again in the summer of 2001, and the Cape Museum of Fine Arts will have a retrospective of his work in the fall of 2001. He will show with the Bakker Gallery in Boston this fall (2000).

Jan Muller

Jan Muller
1922 – 1958

Education:
Art Students League of New York
Hans Hoffman School

Selected Exhibitions:
Hansa Gallery, New York, 1952
Whitney Museum of American Art, 1957
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1962 (solo)
Art Institute of Chicago

Selected Collections:
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
The Museum of Modern Art, New York
The Newark Museum, New Jersey
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York

Commentary:
Jan Muller emigrated from Germany in 1933 after his father was arrested by the Nazis for campaigning against Hitler. The family fled Germany, seeking homes throughout Europe, going to Czechoslovakia and a refugee camp in southern France before finally settling in New York in 1941. He studied at the Art Students League of New York and for five years at the Hans Hoffman School. Muller, a second generation Abstract Expressionist, worked with symbolic figurative expressionism and included the figure in his work, which was a very bold move. He was considered a second generation abstract expressionist prior to becoming one of the pioneers of Figurral Expressionism. He along with artists such as Lester Johnson, Bob Thompson, and Robert Beauchamp were among the first to reintroduce the symbolic figure in their highly expressive avant-garde canvases. He is known for his depictions of brightly colored nudes and his raw use of color.

Although his career was cut short by his untimely death at age 36, Muller achieved a truly impressive level of critical success. His work has been exhibited at the Whitney Museum of American Art, at the Art Institute of Chicago, and in 1962 the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum honored Muller with a major retrospective exhibition. Today his work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the Newark Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

Peter Grippe

Peter Grippe
1912-2002

Art Training
Albright Art School- Burralo, NY – Sculpture & drawing
Art Institute of Buffalo – Scupture, drawing & painting
Atelier 17, New York – Printmaking

Teaching Experience
1934-35: Art Institute of Burralo—Sculpture (student teacher)
1939-42: Federal Arts Project, New York City – Scupture, drawing & painting
1948: Black Mountain College, N.C. – (Summer seesion) Sculpture
1949-50: Pratt Institute, Bklyn, N.Y. (Architecture Dept.) – Drawing & design analysis
1951-52: Smith College, Northampton, Mass. – Sculpture
1951-54: Atelier 17, New York City – Director: also instructor in printmaking
1953-77: Brandeis University, Waltham, Mass. * Sculpture, drawing & printmaking

Presented in Following Collections
Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, Mass.
Musuem of Modern Art, New York
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
Albright Art Gallery, Buffalo, N.Y.
Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio
Tel Aviv Museum, Israel
Georgia Museum, Athens, Ga.
Washington University, St. Louis, Mo.
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Blanden Memorial Art Gallery, Ft. Dodge, Iowa
Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.
Brooklyn Museum, Bklyn, N.Y.
New York Public Library (Main Branch-5th Avenue), New York
Print Club, Philadelphia, Pa.
Musuem of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, R.I.
Chapman Memorial Gallery, Milwaukee-Downer College, Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Philadelphia Museum, Philadelphia, Pa.
National Gallery of Art (Rosenwald Collection) Washington, D.C.
Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minn.
Brandeis University, Waltham, Mass.
United States Information Agency, Bonn, Germany
Joseph Hirshhorn Collection of American Art, Washington, D.C.
Print Council, New York
North Carolina Musuem of Art, Raleigh, N.C.
Guild Hall, Easthampton, Long Island
Newark Museum, New Jersey
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Simmons College, Boston, Mass.
Marion Willard Johnson
Grace Borgenicht
R. Philip Hanes, Jr. (Pres. Art Council of America)
Cleveland Museum
British Museum
Edgar Kaufman, Jr.
Bernard Reis
Harrison & Abromovitz
College of the Moly Cross Worcester, Ma. (cantor gallery)
Rutgers University – New Brunswick, N.J.
Fogg Museum – Harvard Mass.
Bawag Fondation – Wien (Amerikanische Graphic) 1913-1953

One-Man Exhibitions
1942 – Orrefors Galleries, New York City: Sculpture
1944 – Willard Gallery, New York City: Sculpture & Drawings
1945 – Willard Gallery, New York City: Sculpture & Drawings
1946 – Willard Gallery, New York City: Sculpture & Watercolors
1948– Willard Gallery, New York City: Sculpture & Paintings & Prints
1957 – Peridot Gallery, New York City: Sculpture
1958 – Brandies University, Waltham, Ma.: Sculpture & Paintings & Prints
1959 – Peridot Gallery, New York City: Sculpture
1960 – Nordness Gallery, New York City: Sculpture & Collages
1963 – Nordness Gallery, New York City: Sculpture & Collages & Collage Poems
1986 – Cantor Art Gallery, Worcester, Ma.: Sculpture
1991 – Sid Deutsch Gallery, New York: Sculpture, Paintings & Drawings

Biography
Peter Grippe, a member of the American Abstract Artists group, was born on August 11, 1912, in Buffalo, New York, and died on October 18, 2002, in Suffolk, New York. While primarily known as a sculptor working in bronze and clay, he created a portfolio of etchings by 21 artists (examples include Willem de Kooning, Jacques Lipchitz, and Peter Grippe himself) and 21 poets (including Frank O’Hara, Dylan Thomas, and Thomas Merton) in a work entitled 21 Etchings and Poems. The collective work took three years to print and was published by New York’s Morris Gallery in 1960.

Grippe was educated at the Albright-Knox Art School and the Art Institute of Buffalo. He moved to New York in the 1930s, and his work reflects a move into the Cubist and Surrealist schools. Grippe and his colleagues embraced Cubism with its openwork multidimensional view of the world and Surrealist imagery drawn from the subconscious thus bringing American sculpture into the modern era. As Grippe’s artistic and academic career progressed, he taught at several higher education institutions, including Brandeis University, where he was named the first professor of sculpture. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in the category of fine arts in 1964.
Seven years after Grippe’s death, his widow, Florence, made a gift of his work, his personal collection of art, and his personal papers to the Allentown Art Museum of the Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania. He had a gallery exhibition in the Susan Teller Gallery of New York in November 2010.

 

Jay Milder

Jay Milder
(1934-)

Selected Exhibitions:

2005
Celebration, Lohin Geduld Gallery, New York, NY

2004
Lohin Geduld Gallery, New York, NY (solo)

2003
Museum of Modern Art, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil (solo)
Selections, Lohin Geduld Gallery, New York, NY

2001
Andre Zarre Gallery, New York, NY (solo) 2000
Reina Sofia Museum, Madrid, Spain

1999
Museum of Fine Arts, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (solo)
Hugo Pagano Gallery, New York, NY

1998
Elizabeth Harris Gallery, New York, NY

1997
Retrospective show, Hugo Pagano Gallery, New York, NY (solo)

1996
Horace Richter Gallery, Tel Aviv, Israel (solo)

1995
Kathleen Ross Gallery Soho, New York, NY

1994
Alitash Kebede Gallery, Los Angelos, CA (solo)

1993
Greenville Museum, Greenville, SC

1992
Retrospective 1958-92, tour (solo)

1991
Private Stories, Alitash Kebede Fine Art, Los Angeles, CA

1990
Horace Richter Gallery, Jaffa, Israel
The Expanding Figurative Imagination, Anita Shapolsky Gallery, New York, NY

1988
Girgis & Klym Gallery, Fitzroy, Australia (solo)
Eleonore Austerer Fine Art, San Mateo, CA (solo)

1987 “
Jay Milder–Messiah on the IND”, tour

1986
Sid Deutsch Gallery, New York, NY (solo)
Richard Green Gallery, New York, NY (solo)
Gallery Four, Charlotte, VA (solo)

Biography:

Born in Omaha, Nebraska, he became a noted abstract painter in the New York art scene from 1958 when he, Bob Thompson, and Red Grooms founded City Gallery. They were all influenced by Abstract Expressionism, but closer to Willem De Kooning than Jackson Pollock because all three were committed to figurative work.

As a child he was influenced by both the Hasidic mysticism of his ancestors and by the black dominated jazz night clubs he frequented in North Omaha. In the early 1950s he studied in Paris with Ossip Zadkine and Andre Lhote but was most influenced by the abstract work of Chaim Soutine, who had died a decade earlier.

In the 1960s, Milder found himself increasingly an outsider because he had little interest in prevalent styles, Minimalism and Pop Art. He and others formed a group the called Rhino Horn, a loose association of figurative artists who painted in Expressionist style. In the 1970s, with the return of figurative painting in public acceptance, he felt more in the mainstream.

Jack Hall

Jack Hall
(1913-2003)

jackhall

John “Jack” Hughes Hall was born in 1916 into a well-to-do family on Long Island. He graduated from Princeton University in 1935. Between ‘35 and ‘46 he traveled, wrote for newspapers and served in the army.
He first came to Wellfleet in the late ‘30s, taking to the landscape immediately which he described as ‘manageable’. He bought 180 acres and a very old farm compound on Bound Brook Island for $3,500 from Katie Dos Passos, wife of the writer John Dos Passos.
Jack Hall and his close friends, Jack Phillips and Hayden Walling, were the three self-taught, designer/builders in Wellfleet who created a welcoming environment for the European Modernists who arrived in the mid ‘40s. In 1946, Hall started his own design build practice in Wellfleet which he continued intermittently until he retired. Projects included the Peter’s Hill Restaurant building, the Hatch Cottage, and many studios, renovations and additions.
Beginning in 1956, he worked for a number of firms in New York City including Nardin and Radoczy, Tom Lee Ltd., Hughes & Hood and George Nelson and Company.
His study of industrial design led to work on a number of major traveling exhibitions for the US Information Service including Graphics USA in ’63 with Ivan Chermayeff (son of Serge Chermayeff). While with Hughes and Hood he designed many showrooms in the United States and Europe for the Fieldcrest Mills Company.
In 1959 he spent four months in Moscow helping to assemble ‘The Jungle Gym,’ George Nelson’s contribution to the American National Exhibition. He worked with Charles and Ray Eames on a light fixture in 1964 and designed a café table for the Museum of Modern Art’s restaurant.
Hall taught at Parsons School of Design’s Industrial Design Department in 1957-58 and had a simu-ltaneous private architectural practice in New York, executing many townhouse renovations (including one for his friends, Serge and Barbara Chermayeff).
Although when Hall first came to Wellfleet he had an old Rolls Royce and was sometimes referred to as the ‘Squire of Bound Brook,’ he become a beloved fixture in town, especially after moving there full time in the early ‘70s.
He was a serious, lifelong, painter and writer. Hall’s last wife, Marty, was close to Connie Breuer and often would sing at parties while Connie accompanied on jazz piano. Jack Hall died in the winter of 2003 in Wellfleet.

Resia Schor

Resia Schor
(1910-2006)

Chronology
1910: Resia Schor is born Resia Ajnsztajn (or Ainstein) in Lublin, Poland to Lejbe (Arie) Ajnsztajn and Fajga-Brucha (nee Weisman).

1928: Resia and her family move to Warsaw in part so that she can pursue art studies preparatory to applying to the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts.

1930: Resia meets Ilya Schor when she applies to and is enrolled at the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts.

1938: After the death of her father, Resia leaves her mother and two brothers, Solomon and Moses, in Warsaw and joins Ilya in Paris in August. Although unmarried, they live together in a top floor garret at 10 Rue Carlot in the Marais, a Jewish quarter of Paris. Resia enrolls in art history courses at the École du Louvre.

1938: As aliens in France, Resia and Ilya cannot get married in a civil ceremony but they marry in a religious ceremony, not legally recognized by French law. After Germany’s invasion of Poland in September, they are granted resident status and they marry in a civil ceremony in Paris.

1938: At Resia’s insistence, the couple flees to Paris in late May, just ahead of advancing German troops. They head towards Bordeaux to reunite with friends working for the Joint Distribution Committee who had evacuated Paris earlier. Resia and Ilya are the only survivors of the group of about eleven friends, all Polish Jews, who fled Paris together. They settle in Marseilles to wait for immigration visas to America.

1941: Resia and Ilya arrive in New York City via Lisbon, December 3. They settle on the Upper West Side of Manhattan.

1941-1943: Ilya works on jewelry and paintings.

1944: October 10, daughter Naomi is born in New York City.

1947: December 29, Resia and Ilya Schor become Naturalized Citizens of the United States.

1950: June 1, Daughter Mira is born in New York City.

1957: After summers spent in Sayville, NY, Rockport, MA, and Woodstock, NY, the Schors spend their first summer in Provincetown, MA.

1958: Resia Schor has a one-person exhibition, Painting, under the name Resia Ain at The Workshop Gallery, New York City. The Schors return to Europe for the first time since World War II and spend the summer with Mira and Naomi in Paris and travel to Italy.

1960: Resia’s husband, Ilya, dies in New York, June 7, at 57. She participates in a group benefit exhibition held in Provincetown in support of CORE Freedom Fighters.

1962: Resia begins to work with Ilya’s tools and materials.

1969: Resia Schor, Jewelry, The Benson Gallery, Bridgehampton, NY. Resia Schor, group exhibitions: National Jewelry Exhibition by Outstanding Contemporary American Artist-Craftsmen, Lawrence University, Appleton, WI; First Survey of Contemporary American Crafts, The University Art Museum, The University of Texas, Austin; Crafts Invitational, The Gallery of the Maryland Institute, Baltimore, MD. Resia purchases a summer home in Provincetown, MA.

1973: Resia Schor, Sculptured Jewelry, Arras Gallery, New York.

1976: Resia Schor, Sculptured Jewelry, Arras Gallery, New York.

1977: Resia Schor, group exhibitions: The Women’s Art Symposium, Turman Gallery, Indiana State University; Made in Metal, The Junior Art Gallery, Louisville, KY.

1988: Resia Schor, exhibition of sculpture and jewelry, East End Gallery, Provincetown, MA.

1989: Resia Schor, exhibition East End Gallery, Provincetown, MA.

1990: Resia Schor, exhibition East End Gallery, Provincetown, MA.

2000: One-person exhibition Mezuzot by Resia Schor opens at Yeshiva University Museum, New York, on December 5, Resia’s 90th birthday.

2001: Naomi Schor dies of a cerebral hemorrhage December 2, at 58, in New Haven, CT. Her funeral is held in Providence, RI on December 5, Resia’s 91st birthday.

2002: Family, group exhibition including work by Resia, Ilya, and Mira Schor, Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, CT.

2003: Group exhibition with Mira Schor, My Mother Is and Artist, the educational Alliance, curated by Sheila Pepe. Mira Schor, The Tale of the Goldsmith’s Floor, is produced for the 2003 Brown University and differencesConfrence, “The Lure of the Detail,” in honor of Naomi Schor, and also shown at the Fine Arts Work Center and at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum, August 2003.

2006: Resia dies at her home in New York City, November 27. She is buried in Provincetown, December 4.

2008: Works by Resia, Ilya, and Mira Schor included in The Studio Show, Provincetown Art Association and Museum; Ilya Schor is reburied with Resia in Provincetown.

Selected Collections
The Jerusalem Great Synagogue, Jacob and Belle Rosenbaum Mezuzah Collection
Private Collections

Biography
Resia Schor was born in Lublin, Poland, December 5, 1910 and died in New York City, November 27, 2006. She was a Polish-born artist who lived and worked in New York City from 1941 until her death in 2006.

She studied painting at the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw. There she met the painter and sculptor Ilya Schor; they were married in Paris at the outbreak of the Second World War. In 1941 they came to the United States and settled in New York City. Both Schors’ extended families perished in the Holocaust. The Schors had two daughters born in New York City: artist and writer Mira Schor and scholar of French literature and feminist theory, Naomi Schor. Mrs. Schor exhibited her paintings in New York City in the 1950s under the name Resia Ain; she also studied silversmithing with her husband.

After Ilya Schor’s death in 1961, Resia Schor worked exclusively in metal, creating one of a kind jewelry and Judaica, as well as multi-media sculptures, all in a bold modernist abstract style with a painterly feel for color and texture.

The noted poet Richard Howard wrote of Schor’s work: “…the underlying signification … that Resia Schor has undertaken all along. If I had to find a single word for it, I should choose process, the continuous process of growth and change which we recognize in all plant forms and which we cannot dissect or paralyze to any purpose by “realism”.

She exhibited her works in solo exhibitions at the Arras Gallery in New York City, The East End Gallery in Provincetown, MA, and The Benson Gallery in Bridgehampton, New York. In the 1980s and 1990s, her work was included in group exhibitions at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum (PAAM) and in the exhibition Family, at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museumin Connecticut. In the late 1960s and the 1970s, her work was included in exhibitions including “The Women’s Art Symposium,” Turman Gallery, Indiana State University,” Made in Metal,” The Junior Art Gallery, Louisville, KY, “National Jewelry Exhibition by Outstanding Contemporary American Artist–Craftsmen,” Lawrence University, Appleton, WI, “First Survey of Contemporary American Crafts,” The University Art Museum, The University of Texas, Austin, and “Crafts Invitational,” The Gallery of the Maryland Institute, Baltimore, MD.

In 1969, the musicians of the orchestra of the New York Philharmonic commissioned a mezuzah by Resia Schor as their farewell gift to Leonard Bernstein. An exhibition “Mezuzot by Resia Schor” was held at Yeshiva University Museum in New York City in 2000.

Ilya Schor

Ilya Schor
(1904-1961)

Chronology
1904: Ilya Schor is born as Izrael Schor in Zloczow (Galicia), in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, later Poland (now the Ukraine) to Naftali Schor, a Hasidic folk artist, and his wife, Krajdla.

1920: Ilya is apprenticed to an engraver and learns skills in metalwork and engraving that he will utilize for the rest of his life.

1928: Ilya begins his studies in painting at the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts1930: Ilya meets Resia Schor when Resia applies to and is enrolled at the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts.

1936: Ilya graduates from the Academy of Fine Arts.

1937: Ilya is awarded a grant by the Polish government to study in Paris and Italy. He arrives in Paris in April. He works for one of his professors on a large mural at the Polish Pavilion at the World’s Fair in Paris in 1937. When the project is complete his professor advises him to stay in Paris because there are few opportunities for a Jewish artist in Poland.

1938: Ilya exhibits in the Salon d’Automne, Paris. Though an unknown, his work is singled out for a positive review.

1938: Although unmarried, Ilya and Resia live together in Paris in a top floor garret at 10 Rue Charlot in the Marais, a Jewish quarter of Paris.

1938: As aliens in France, Ilya and Resia cannot get married in a civil ceremony but they marry in a religious ceremony, not legally recognized by French law. After Germany’s invasion of Poland in September, they are granted resident status and they marry in a civil ceremony in Paris. Ilya participates in Salon d’Automne, Paris.

1938: At Resia’s insistence, Ilya and his spouse flee to Paris in late May, just ahead of advancing German troops. They head towards Bordeaux to reunite with friends working for the Joint Distribution Committee who had evacuated Paris earlier. Ilya and Resia are the only survivors of the group of about eleven friends, all Polish Jews, who fled Paris together. They settle in Marseilles to wait for immigration visas to America. Ilya is interned twice by Vichy forces.

1941: Ilya and Resia arrive in New York City via Lisbon, December 3. They settle on the Upper West Side of Manhattan.

1941-1943: Resia works with other recent refugee intellectuals and artists in a small garment factory producing hand-painted tiles.

1944: Exhibition of Gouaches by Ilya Schor: Compositions, Flowers, Landscapes, Still Life, March, 58th Street Branch, New York Public Library. October 10, daughter Naomi is born in New York City.

1944: Ilya exhibits work in a group exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Boston.

1947: Ilya Schor: Paintings on Yiddish Themes, April 19 to May 25, Gallery of Jewish Art, New York. Ilya’s work is included in the inaugural exhibition of The Jewish Museum in its home in the former Warburg mansion on Fifth Avenue, The Giving of the Law and the Ten Commandments, May. The Schors travel to Los Angeles to visit the family of his late half-brother, Abraham Schor. Ilya’s work is included in the United Jewish Welfare fund’s Artfair, Los Angeles, CA. December 29, Ilya and Resia Schor become Naturalized Citizens of the United States.

1949: Ilya Schor’s work is included in The One Hundred and Forty-Fourth Annual Exhibition of the Painting and Sculpture, January 23-February 27, The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia.

1950: Publication of Abraham Joshua Heschel’s The Earth Is the Lord’s: The Inner World of the Jew in Eastern Europe, with wood-engraving illustrations by Ilya Schor; Ilya Schor, Jewish Artists, 1950: Annual Exhibition, Congress for Jewish culture, Jewish Museum, NYC. June 1, daughter Mira is born in New York City.

1951: Publication of Abraham J. Heschel’s The Sabbath: Its Meaning for Modern Man, with wood-engraving illustrations by Ilya Schor; publication of Hillel: The Book Against the Sword, by Ely E. Pilchick, with illustrations by Ilya Schor.

1953: Ilya Schor, Oils, Gouaches, February 2-14, Harry Salpeter Gallery; Group exhibition, 34 Jewish Artists, May, Sea Isle Museum of Contemporary Art, Miami Beach. Publication of Adventures of Mottel the Cantor’s Son, by Sholem Aleichem, with wood engraving illustrations by Ilya Schor. Instillation of Torah Crown and Breastplates, Congregation Emanu-el B’ne Jeshurun, Milwaukee, WI.

1954: Drawings and Prints by Jewish Artists, November-December, Congress for Jewish Culture Art Center, New York City.

1956: Ilya Schor, Six American Sculptors, Arts Club of Chicago; May 11, Dedication of Ilya Schor’s The Doors of the 36, Temple Beth-El of Great Neck, New York.

1957: Ilya Schor, Art in Judaism – Past and Present, Newark Museum; April 17, Dedication for New Torah Ornaments by Ilya Schor, Temple Israel, Boston, MA. After summers spent in Sayville, NY, Rockport, MA, and Woodstock, NY, the Schors spend their first summer in Provincetown, MA.

1958: Ilya Schor’s work is included in Gods and the Man in Art, The American Federation of Arts: patron Robert Trubek commissions a bracelet and pendant by Ilya Schor as a gift to The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The Schors return to Europe for the first time since World War II and spend the summer with Mira and Naomi in Paris and travel to Italy.

1959: Ilya Schor included in several group exhibitions at the HCE Gallery, Provincetown, including the second annual sculpture exhibition, August 6, and Six American Sculptors, Milwaukee Arts Center.

1960: Ilya Schor is included in Liturgical Art, Arts Club of Chicago, and group exhibitions including the third annual sculpture exhibition (July 28), HCE Gallery, Provincetown.

1961: Ilya Schor dies in New York, June 7, at 57. His work is included in International Exhibition of Modern Jewelry 1819-1961, October 26-December 2, Victoria and Albert Museum, and Wood Engravings by Ilya Schor, December 3-18, Newark YM-WYHA, Newark, NJ.

1962: Wood Engravings by Ilya Schor, July-August, Temple of Aaron, St. Paul, MN and YMHA of Bergen County, January 14-February 2, Hackensak, NJ.

1963: Ilya Schor Memorial Exhibition, April, Harz ion Temple, Philadelphia, PA.

1965: Ilya Schor, Retrospective Exhibition, July 8-September 12, The Jewish Museum, New York, NY.

1975: Life of the Old Jewish Shtel: Paintings and Silver by Ilya Schor, Yeshiva University Museum, New York.

2000: Ilya Schor and His Great Neck Patrons, Elsie K. Rudin Judaica Museum, Great Neck, NY.

2002: Family, group exhibition including work by Ilya, Resia, and Mira Schor, Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, CT.

2003: Group exhibition with Mira Schor, My Mother Is and Artist, the educational Alliance, curated by Sheila Pepe. Mira Schor, The Tale of the Goldsmith’s Floor, is produced for the 2003 Brown University and differences Conference, “The Lure of the Detail,” in honor of Naomi Schor, and also shown at the Fine Arts Work Center and at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum, August 2003.

2008: Works by Ilya, Resia, and Mira Schor included in The Studio Show, Provincetown Art Association and Museum; Ilya Schor is reburied with Resia in Provincetown.

Selected Collections
The Jerusalem Great Synagogue, Jacob and Belle Rosenbaum Mezuzah Collection
The Jewish Center, Cracow, Portland
The Jewish Museum, New York City
Metropolitan Museum of Art
North Carolina Museum of Art
Sydney Jewish Museum, Sydney, Australia
Temple Beth-El and Elise K. Rudin Judaica Museum, Great, New York
Temple Israel, Brookline, MA
The Washington Hebrew Congregation, Washington, DC
Private Collections

Biography
lya Schor
 (16 April 1904, Zloczow – 7 June 1961, New York City) was a multi-faceted artist, a painter, jeweler, engraver, sculptor, and renowned artist of Judaica.

Ilya Schor was born in Zloczow (Galicia), in the Austrian Empire, later Poland, in 1904. He came from a deeply Hasidic family. His father Naftali Schorr was a folk-artist, painting colorfully illustrated store signs for local merchants. Ilya Schor first trained as an apprentice in metal crafts and engraving before enrolling at the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts in 1930 where he studied painting. In 1937, he was awarded a grant by the Polish government to study in Paris. He exhibited successfully at the Salon d’Automne in 1938. Ilya Schor and his artist wife Resia Schor immigrated to the United States in December, 1941, from Marseilles, via Lisbon, after fleeing Paris in late May 1940. Ilya Schor and Resia Schor had two daughters, born in New York City: artist and writer Mira Schor (b. 1950) and noted literary scholar and theorist, Naomi Schor (1943–2001).

In New York City, Ilya Schor began artwork that would keep fresh his memories of life of the Jews of Eastern Europe, working in the many materials and with the numerous skills at his disposal. He worked on major commissions for synagogues in the United States. Schor’s wood-engraving illustrations for The Earth is The Lord’s and The Sabbath, both important writings by the renowned philosopher and theologian, Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel, and for Adventures of Mottel The Cantor’s Son by Sholem Aleichem, have remained in print for over fifty years. Rabbi Heschel wrote of Schor’s work, “In the stillness of the precious images Ilya Schor has called into being, generations to come will hear the voice and the spirit of eternal Israel, the inwardness and piety of our people of Eastern Europe.” Schor was also the creator of unique jewelry and small Judaica objects in silver and gold. In later years he also worked on abstract sculptures in brass and copper.

His work was exhibited at The Salpeter Gallery in New York 1953, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Boston, and the Jewish Museum (New York), 1948, and was included in group exhibitions such as Liturgical Art, Arts Club of Chicago and at the HCE Gallery, Provincetown MA, 1959 and 60; Six American Sculptors, Milwaukee Arts Center; Art in Judaism – Past and Present, Newark Museum, 1957; Six American Sculptors, Arts Club of Chicago, 1956.

Ilya Schor died in New York City in 1961. A retrospective of his work was held at the Jewish Museum (New York) in 1965. Another smaller exhibition of works in varied media, “Life of the Old Jewish Shtetl: Paintings and Silver by Ilya Schor,” was held at Yeshiva University Museum in 1975. His works are included in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Jewish Museum (New York), The Jerusalem Great Synagogue Jacob and Belle Rosenbaum Mezuzah Collection, North Carolina Museum of Art, and Sydney Jewish Museum, Sydney, Australia.