Press Releases

Press Releases issued by Acme Fine Art

PRINT PORTFOLIO: A Virtual Exhibition

Moy Abstract Visit High ResACME Fine Art’s upcoming virtual exhibition Print Portfolio will feature a selection of etchings, lithographs, woodblock prints and silkscreens by artists Seong Moy, Charles Littler, Grace Martin Taylor, Edwin Dickinson, George McNeil, Lillian Burk Meeser and Agnes Weinrich. Although these artists are from different generations and work in different styles, they all have a Provincetown, Massachusetts connection in common. This will be ACME Fine Art’s first exclusively online exhibition. The exhibition will open on 1 April 2010 and will be accessible at www.acmefineart.com.

Edwin Dickinson was one of the first artists to rent at studio at Days Lumberyard, which would later become Provincetown’s most vital studio complex. Dickinson made etchings for a short period of time, primarily during the year 1916, which “may have been motivated by the idea that prints were easier to sell than paintings.*” Although Dickinson did find etching to be profitable, by 1924 his preference for painting had prevailed. As a result of his short time as a printmaker and his small editions, Dickinson’s etchings are thus very rare. His etchings from this period and on view in Print Portfolio are primarily Provincetown scenes, including Cape Cod Birds and Montello Street, both from 1916. Dickinson used fine, delicate lines to produce detailed, yet powerful compositions. A number of Dickinson’s etchings were included in Edwin Dickinson in Provincetown, 1912-1937, an exhibition at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum in 2007.

Grace Martin Taylor is best known for her white-line woodblock prints, otherwise known as Provincetown prints, which are made using the first printmaking technique unique to the United States. The white-line woodblock technique is derivative of Japanese woodblock printmaking, a link that Taylor must have considered when composing her colorful Japanese influenced images. To produce white-line woodblock prints, colored inks were individually painted onto a section of a single carved woodblock and printed, a painstaking process that required much planning and drying time. White-line woodblock prints by Lillian Burk Meeser and Agnes Weinrich will also be featured in the exhibition.

Seong Moy, Charles Littler and George McNeil were all associated with Hans Hofmann early in their careers. Seong Moy, who emigrated from China at the age of ten, learned printmaking as part of a WPA project at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis. His dynamic abstract woodcut prints are an amalgamation of his Chinese artistic heritage and the teachings of Hofmann. Moy taught painting and printmaking at many institutions, most notably the Art Students League and Pratt Graphic Center, in addition to forming his own school in Provincetown. Charles Littler incorporated the wood grain texture into his graphic woodblock prints. Using a limited palette of black and white, greens and browns, Littler composed abstracts of thick, sinuous lines evocative of the human form.

George McNeil’s use of brilliant colors and varying textures in his silkscreens and lithographs parallels his painting style. McNeil produced only a few color silkscreens in small editions during his abstract expressionist period. In 1971 McNeil began a residency at the Tamarind Institute at the University of New Mexico, where he learned the technical skills of lithography. McNeil’s lithographs from the 1970s and 80s utilize these complex skills, while maintaining the spontaneity of his paintings. McNeil’s prints are included in the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Institute Print Collection.

Please contact the gallery at 617.585.9551 or info@acmefineart.com for more information about these artists or the exhibition. These works are available for viewing at the gallery by appointment.
*Ward, John L. Edwin Dickinson: A Critical History of His Paintings. Rosemount Publishing and Printing Corp., 2003.

GEORGE LLOYD PAINTINGS AND DRAWINGS FROM THE FIGURATIVE PERIOD

ACME Lloyd Still Life with Pink Coffee PotFor ACME Fine Art’s second solo exhibition of artwork by George Lloyd, gallery director David Cowan has assembled a fine group of rare works from what the artist refers to as his Figurative Period. The exhibition will open with a reception from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. on Friday 15 January 2010, and it will be on view through Saturday 6 March 2010.

George Lloyd received his BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design in 1967, and went on to earn his MFA in 1969 from the Yale University School of Art, where he studied with Lester Johnson and Jack Tworkov. Following the completion of his graduate studies, Lloyd accepted a teaching position at the University of California, Berkeley. The artwork that was created during this fertile period while living and working in the San Francisco Bay Area –the early 1970s- is what constitutes the Figurative Period of Lloyd’s work. It was also during that time that he participated in a weekly drawing group with renowned Bay Area artists, Elmer Bischoff, Joan Brown, and Gordon Cook. Together the four artists participated in a group exhibition of the work created in the drawing group sessions that was titled New Drawings. The exhibition was first mounted at the Charles Campbell Gallery (San Francisco), and later at the Crocker Art Museum (Sacramento) in 1973.

The importance of the drawing group and of “drawing” itself in Lloyd’s early work cannot be overstated. In an interview in 2000, he was quoted saying that “In retrospect, it is clear that drawing was the dominant concern in my paintings during this early Berkeley period.” When viewing the paintings; however, one is more struck by the effusive spirit that the work conveys. While we may see peripheral flashes of Henri Matisse, Stuart Davis, Robert de Niro Sr. and/ or Hans Hofmann, what we are left with in the end is an original, individual, eloquent voice. These paintings are brilliantly chromatic. They are also concisely edited, elegantly composed, and freshly and sensually expressed in a modern idiom that speaks an abstract visual language that is nonetheless readily understood.

Lloyd moved back to the east coast in 1982, settling more or less permanently in Portland Maine in 1985. He continues to teach and to paint, and his contemporary work is exhibited regularly in museum and gallery exhibitions throughout the U.S. Lloyd’s contemporary work appears to be a natural outgrowth of the interests demonstrated in the work created during his formative years in California. In addition to teaching at U.C. Berkeley, Lloyd has held teaching positions at Cornell University, the University of Southern Maine and at Wesleyan University. He was awarded Pollock Krasner Foundation grants in both 1994 and 2006. Lloyd’s work is in the permanent collections of the Oakland Museum of Art, the Portland Museum of Art, the University of Maine Museum of Art, the Ogunquit Museum of American Art, and the University Art Museum of the University of California, Santa Barbara. In addition to those institutions already listed George Lloyd’s work has been exhibited at the National Academy of Design, the Johnson Museum, Cornell University, the Center for Maine Contemporary Art, and the Center for the Visual Arts (Oakland CA).

ACME Fine Art’s exhibition of paintings and drawings from George Lloyd’s figurative period will be on view from 15 January to 6 March 2010. Gallery hours are 11:00 to 5:30 Tuesday through Saturday. Please contact the gallery at 617.585.9551 or info@acmefineart.com for more information about the artist or the exhibition. The entire exhibition will be viewable on-line at www.acmefineart.com.

DIRECTOR’S CHOICE: David Cowan’s Favorites

ACME Dickinson Chateau15 January – 23 April, 2010

An exhibition titled DIRECTOR’S CHOICE will open with a reception from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. on Friday 15 January 2010 at ACME Fine Art’s 38 Newbury Street gallery. The exhibition will feature a selection of recently acquired paintings, drawings, and sculpture by noted 20th century modern American artists.

The stylistically diverse group of works that comprise the exhibition was assembled by Gallery Director David Cowan from a variety of private collections and estates, with the intent to display the breadth and quality of artwork in the current gallery collection. The exhibition will embrace Surrealism, Early Modernism, Abstract Expressionism, and Figural Abstraction.

In addition, a fine group of Indian Space Paintings by Will Barnet, Steve Wheeler and Peter Busa will be included. Other artists whose work is represented include expressionist painters Jack Tworkov, Stephen Pace, Dorothy Eisner, William Kienbusch, George McNeil and Robert Beauchamp. Rare Surrealist canvases by Federico Castellon and Harold Sterner will also help form the exhibition.

A landscape gem previously exhibited at the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Hirschhorn Museum that was created by early modern painter Edwin Dickinson in 1938 will round out the diverse group of artworks.

DIRECTOR’S CHOICE will be on view at ACME Fine Art through 23 April 2010.

For further information about this exhibition or other gallery events, please contact the gallery at 617.585.9551, or via e-mail at info@acmefineart.com.

ACME Fine Art and Design is located in Boston’s Back Bay at 38 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts, 02116. Gallery hours are 11:00am to 5:30pm Tuesday through Saturday.

 

GEORGE McNEIL: The Women Works on Paper 1938-1972

ACME McNeil Untitled Figure15 January – 6 March, 2010

ACME Fine Art’s upcoming exhibition George McNeil: The Women will feature newly acquired works on paper that have not previously been shown. The exhibition will open with a reception from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. on Friday 12 March and will be on view through Saturday 8 May 2010.

George McNeil began his artistic exploration during his teenage years in 1922 when he began art classes at the Brooklyn Museum. McNeil studied at the Art Students League, Hans Hofmann School of Fine Art and Columbia University, worked on a WPA Federal Art Project and was a founding member of American Abstract Artists. McNeil is best known as an American modernist and first-generation Abstract Expressionist painter.

George McNeil: The Women includes representations of the female figure from 1938-1972, spanning McNeil’s figurative, abstract expressionist and late figurative periods. An early ink drawing from 1938, during his time as a teacher at the Hans Hofmann School, exemplifies McNeil’s deconstruction of form that preceded his abstract expressionist works. Two unique works from Paris in 1952 show the influence of Andre Lhote, a renowned Cubist artist and teacher whose figure drawing classes McNeil briefly attended. These rare Parisian figure drawings depict stylized forms in elegant poses, yet were executed during a period in which McNeil’s works were almost exclusively abstract. Forming the centerpiece of the exhibition is a charcoal drawing from 1972 in which McNeil used strong lines and exaggerated foreshortening to render a reclining nude.

McNeil exhibited widely during his career through numerous solo and group shows at galleries and museums nationwide. McNeil’s work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, National Gallery of Art, Whitney Museum of American Art, Corcoran Museum of Art, Museum of Contemporary Art of Los Angeles, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Brooklyn Museum of Art, Farnsworth Art Museum, Walker Art Center, and the Provincetown Art Association and Museum among others.

ACME Fine Art’s exhibition of works on paper by George McNeil will be on view from 12 March to 8 May 2010.

For further information about this exhibition or other gallery events, please contact the gallery at 617.585.9551, or via e-mail at info@acmefineart.com

ACME Fine Art and Design is located in Boston’s Back Bay at 38 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts, 02116. Gallery hours are 11:00am to 5:30pm Tuesday through Saturday.

 

CHARLES LITTLER: Selections from the Artist’s Estate

ACME Littler Cape Cod Landscape High Res30 October – 23 December, 2009

On 30 October 2009 CHARLES LITTLER: Selections from the Artist’s Estate will open at ACME Fine Art, Boston. A reception from six to eight on Friday evening 30 October will mark the opening. The exhibition will be on view through 23 December.

ACME Fine Art’s first solo exhibition of the work of this talented 20th century modernist will feature a selection of fine examples of paintings and collages from early in Littler’s lengthy career, with work ranging in dates from the early 1950s to the mid-1960s. Cape Cod Landscape, circa 1952, an oil painting depicting Provincetown Harbor that Littler painted while in Provincetown to study with Hans Hofmann, will form the centerpiece of the exhibition. Other notable works include Red Dot Collage, circa 1958 which is a playful abstract pastel drawing accented by strips of paper collage, and punctuated by an adhesive red dot. Still Life, circa 1955, a mixed media painting in shades of gray and glossy black and white, demonstrates just how successfully Littler was able to integrate the concepts espoused by Hofmann into his own distinctive artistic expression.

Charles Littler studied at Alfred University in south central New York state, and at Hans Hofmann’s School of Art in both New York City, and in Provincetown Massachusetts. In the 1950s he was – along with James Gahagan and William Freed – one of the founding members of one of the early cooperative galleries in Manhattan called the James Gallery. In the late 1950s Littler migrated west to Arizona, where he accepted a teaching position at the University of Arizona. Shortly thereafter, Litttler and a small group of his colleagues collectively purchased an aging dude ranch to form a cooperative artists’ community which they named Rancho Linda Vista. Over time, the ranch established a group consciousness that Littler felt compelled to nurture, saying “My view of Rancho Linda Vista is that it’s a work-of-art, initiated by me and executed collaboratively by many members-past, present and future (including all of those who don’t even think of themselves as artists).” Since Littler’s death in 1991, his legacy of Rancho Linda Vista lives on, and is now populated by a younger generation of artists who continue to be inspired by Littler’s original vision.

ACME Fine Art’s CHARLES LITTLER: Selections from the Estate of the Artist will be on view at the gallery until 23 December 2009.

For further information about this exhibition or other gallery events, please contact the gallery at 617.585.9551, or via e-mail at info@acmefineart.com.

ACME Fine Art and Design is located in Boston’s Back Bay at 38 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts, 02116. Gallery hours are 11:00am to 5:30pm Tuesday through Saturday.

ROBERT BEAUCHAMP: ANIMALIA

ACME Beauchamp Two Apples HighRes30 October – 23 December, 2009

On 30 October 2009 ROBERT BEAUCHAMP: ANIMALIA will open at ACME Fine Art, Boston. For ACME Fine Art’s second solo exhibition of the work of this art-historically significant painter, we have selected a group of twelve important canvasses and works on paper that were created between 1965 and 1990. The theme for the exhibition is Beauchamp’s interest in the animal kingdom in his work; hence, the title: ANIMALIA. A reception from six to eight on Friday evening (the 30th) will mark the opening. The exhibition will run through 23 December.

Robert Beauchamp (1923-1995) was a central figure in the Figurative Expressionist movement that emerged out of Abstract Expressionism in New York in the late 1950s and 1960s. As ANIMALIA will demonstrate, Beauchamp’s work – especially that from the “early” period- is filled with exquisitely drawn cavorting creatures – animal and human, real and otherworldly – that fully occupy the canvas in vivid technicolor, and stimulate the viewers’ intellect and imagination to the extreme.

The Figurative Fifties – an exhibition mounted by the Newport Harbor Art Museum in 1988 – was the seminal exhibition recognizing Figurative Expressionism and the important group of artists who were its practitioners. Along with Robert Beauchamp, curators Paul Schimmel and Judith Stein included Larry Rivers, Lester Johnson, George McNeil, Jan Müller, Grace Hartigan, Bob Thompson, and Fairfield Porter, among others, as the featured artists in the exhibition, and identified them as principal participants in the movement. In his essay that accompanied the exhibition catalogue, Carter Ratcliff quoted Irving Sandler saying that Robert Beauchamp “wanted to unveil the ‘aborigine’ hiding in the civilized self.” Ratcliff then goes on to add, “A brilliant ironist, Beauchamp twisted his recollections of Gauguin’s Tahiti and the German Expressionists’ Eden into images of remarkable delicacy. He played at primitivism the way other figure painters… played at abstraction…. Yet his art mixes authentically primitive feelings with an urban and at times almost arch refinement. He implies that selves are double, brutal and sophisticated, and there is a familiar doubleness in his conception of painting.”

Later in the exhibition catalogue, in her essay titled, Aspects of Figuration in New York, Judith Stein quoted Philip Pearlstein, Lois Dodd, and Sally Hazlet saying in a published conversation that “When you first come in it’s all Beauchamp, then you begin to discover the subject matter, then you see the influences… Picasso, Degas, Gauguin, Japanese, Klimt, Schiele, de Kooning, Mantegna, Egyptian Art. But it’s all Beauchamp.”

ACME Fine Art’s ROBERT BEAUCHAMP: ANIMALIA will be on view at the gallery until 23 December 2009.

For more information on Robert Beauchamp, including extensive lists of exhibitions of his work and of museums whose permanent collections contain artwork by him, please peruse this website.

For further information about this exhibition or other gallery events, please contact the gallery at 617.585.9551, or via e-mail at info@acmefineart.com.

ACME Fine Art and Design is located in Boston’s Back Bay at 38 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts, 02116. Gallery hours are 11:00am to 5:30pm Tuesday through Saturday.

RICHARD FILIPOWSKI: PAINTINGS & SCULPTURE

Picture 01317 September – 24 October 2009

On 17 September 2009 RICHARD FILIPOWSKI: PAINTINGS & SCULPTURE will open at ACME Fine Art, Boston. ACME Fine Art is delighted to present in this first solo exhibition of artwork by Richard Filipowski in our gallery, a choice selection of sculpture and painting created between 1948 and 1988. We are thrilled to represent the estate of this multi-dimensional, multi-talented artist. A reception from six to eight on Thursday evening (the 17th) will mark the opening. The exhibition will run through 24 October.

Richard Filipowski (1923-2008) was a Polish émigré who began art studies in Toronto at age sixteen. That was 1939, and it is notable that in the same year he won his first important national competition – namely the Vimy Memorial Poster Competition – in Canada. Filipowski continued his artistic endeavors as a student at the Illinois Institute of Technology (Chicago Bauhaus) from 1942 to 1946. While there and under the tutelage of Lazlo Moholy-Nagy, Filipowski pursued interests in painting, drawing, architecture, and sculpture, and he began exhibiting his work at local galleries. In 1944, Filipowski’s first big break came when his work was selected for a landmark group exhibition at the Julian Levy Gallery in New York that was titled Imagery of Chess. The artists comprising the “group” were expatriate European Surrealists for the most part, and they included Man Ray and Marcel Duchamp among others.

Upon receiving his degree at I.I.T. in 1946, Filipowski was invited by Moholy-Nagy to join the faculty there, and thus began a brilliant teaching career that spanned more than forty years. While in Chicago, Filipowski’s work was included in numerous group exhibitions at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Illinois State Museum, the Benjamin Gallery, and at I.I.T. where he was honored with a solo exhibition in 1947. Filipowski left the Chicago area when Walter Gropius offered him the opportunity to develop and direct the Fundamentals of Design program at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design in 1950. Filipowski’s thirty seven year professorship at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology began with his appointment as Associate Professor of Visual Design in the Department of Architecture in 1952. He was named Professor Emeritus by M.I.T. in 1988.

Filipowski worked back and forth between two and three-dimensional artwork throughout his career. Both aspects of his work – painting and sculpture – have been widely exhibited and collected. In addition to those institutions already mentioned, Filipowski’s work has been exhibited at the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University, the DeCordova Museum, the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, the De Menil Museum, Houston, and the Noguchi Museum, in New York City. Large scale commissioned sculptures were an important aspect of Filipowski’s body of work. Some of those included commissions for Temple Israel, Swampscott MA, Temple Emmanuel, Dallas TX, Temple B’rith Kodesh, Rochester NY, Trinity Lutheran Church, Philadelphia PA, and the North End Branch of the Boston Public Library. Today, examples of Richard Filipowski’s painting or sculpture are in the permanent collections of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Addison Gallery of American Art, and the Walter Gropius House Museum among others.

ACME Fine Art’s RICHARD FILIPOWSKI: PAINTINGS & SCULPTURE will be on view at the gallery until 24 October 2009.

For further information about this exhibition or other gallery events, please contact the gallery at 617.585.9551, or via e-mail at info@acmefineart.com.

The Watercolors of TONY VEVERS

Picture 01220 March – 8 May, 2009

On Friday, 20 March 2009 THE WATERCOLORS OF TONY VEVERS, an exhibition of landscape-inspired abstractions by Tony Vevers from the 1950s, will open at ACME Fine Art, Boston. A reception from six to eight on Friday evening (the 20th) will mark the opening. The exhibition will be on view through 8 May.

Upon emigrating from England to the United States in 1940 at the age of fourteen, Tony Vevers was impressed by the sprawling lushness of the American landscape. This connection to and appreciation of the American landscape quickly formed a theme in Vevers’ artistic pursuits, a theme that continued throughout his lengthy career as an artist and educator. Vevers was surrounded by art as a boy, and he was eager to undertake the serious study of painting and drawing as soon as he could. He welcomed the opportunity to do so at the Hotchkiss School in Lakeville CT, where he particularly enjoyed painting the landscape en-plein-air. In 1946 Vevers went on to study at Yale University where he earned his BA degree in Drawing and Painting in1950.

Following graduation from Yale Vevers spent time traveling in Italy. While there his focus was on abstracting the landscape in oil paintings and in watercolors. Of this period Vevers said, “When I first got there I tried to do a more abstract figuration. By the end of my stay, I was taken with the idea of working abstractly through nature, something I’ve always done.”

Upon his return to the US, Vevers attended the Hans Hofmann School in New York. While many of his colleagues’ work adopted a more distinctly non-objective, abstract expressionist style, Vevers work consistently maintained a connection to nature. In fact, by 1955 Vevers was beginning to incorporate the human figure into his work. This was at a time when such a thing was almost taboo among the art world’s avant-garde elite.

The watercolors that will be featured in ACME Fine Art’s upcoming exhibition include two early Italian landscapes, and a group of four exceptional shoreline-inspired abstractions painted in Provincetown from 1958. This was a period that was particularly rich both with respect to the history of the arts in Provincetown but also in Vevers’ own development as an artist. At that time he was exhibiting his work at a relatively small gallery known as the Sun Gallery on Commercial Street in Provincetown. His colleagues in the gallery were such artists as: Jan Muller, Bob Thompson, Lester Johnson and Red Grooms, and all were breaking new ground by bringing the “subject” back to modern art.

Vevers exhibited at many notable institutions throughout her career, including Indianapolis Art League, IA; Boston University Art Gallery; Cape Museum of Fine Arts; Copenhagen City Gallery, Denmark; Georgia Museum of Art, Athens, GA; Guildhall Museum, East Hampton, NY; and the Indiana State Museum, Indianapolis, IA. Vevers’ work is represented in the permanent collections of the Isaac Delgardo Museum of Art, New Orleans, LA; the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA; Farleigh-Dickinson University, NJ; Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN; Walter Chrysler Museum, Norfolk, VA; Hirshhorn Museum, Washington, DC; Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, MA.

For further information about this exhibition or other gallery events, please contact the gallery at 617.585.9551, or via e-mail at info@acmefineart.com.

 

STEPHEN PACE: EARLY WORK

ACME Pace 55-06 High Res20 March – 8 May, 2009

STEPHEN PACE: EARLY WORK, ACME Fine Art’s second solo exhibition of Stephen Pace’s abstract expressionist works, will open on 20 March 2009. This exhibition will focus on watercolors and oil paintings that were created between 1950 to 1955. This was an important developmental period for Pace, one that traces his growth from student at the Hans Hofmann School to accomplished member of the New York School. A reception from six to eight on Friday evening (the 20th) will mark the opening. The exhibition will run through 8 May. Exhibition catalogues are available by contacting the gallery.

Although today he is widely recognized for his contemporary figurative paintings and watercolors, Stephen Pace made his name in the art world in the 1950s and early 1960s for his non-objective Abstract Expressionist canvases. During this period Pace found representation at the Howard Wise Gallery in New York, and Wise mounted five solo exhibitions of Pace’s work over the course of two decades. His work was also included in group exhibitions at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, the Museum of Modern Art, the Cleveland Museum of Art, the Walker Art Center (Minneapolis), the Art Institute of Chicago, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art (four times) during this period.

Following military service in World War II, Pace came to New York and studied with the man who is widely recognized as one of the 20th century’s most important and influential art educators, Hans Hofmann. As a post-war student of Hofmann, Pace is today labeled a second generation Abstract Expressionist; however, throughout the 1950s during the heyday of the Abstract Expressionist movement, Pace’s contemporary work was exhibited along side the most respected of the first generation artists. Hans Hofmann had high regard for Pace, and in a LOOK magazine story from 1959 he described Pace as an “original talent.” In connection with an exhibition of paintings by Pace at the Walker Art Center in 1961 Hofmann said that Pace was a “great contemporary talent… with great plastic imagination and immense vitality and inventiveness in the realm of color.”The focus of ACME Fine Art’s upcoming exhibition of Stephen Pace’s non-representational work will be the paintings produced between 1950 and 1955. The idea is to trace Pace’s exploration and development from the point of interface with maestro Hofmann through this highly productive five-year period, which culminated in the establishment of his mature, unique, expressionist voice. As it still can be seen today in his contemporary canvases, this work is at once lyrical, and poetic; however, these early paintings demonstrate a fearless vigor and bold masculinity that is uniquely both compelling and provocative.

Exhibition catalogues are available upon request.

For further information about this exhibition or other gallery events, please contact the gallery at 617.585.9551, or via e-mail at info@acmefineart.com.

ROBERT KIPNISS: PAINTINGS

Untitled Big Branches9 January – 14 March, 2009

On 9 January 2009 ROBERT KIPNISS: PAINTINGS, an exhibition of recent paintings by artist Robert Kipniss, will open at ACME Fine Art, Boston. A reception from six to eight on Friday evening (the 9th) will mark the opening. Robert Kipniss will give a gallery talk on 5 Decades of Painting on Saturday, 10 January at 3 PM. The exhibition will run through 14 March.

There is a quiet beauty about Robert Kipniss’ paintings that makes his work accessible to many viewers; however, to see his work as merely beautifully rendered landscape and still life paintings is to overlook much of their content. A reviewer for Time magazine once eloquently described paintings by Robert Kipniss as existing in the “twilight zone between recollection and imagination….” The writer then went on to add that the work offers “the appearance of reality and the ambiance of dreams.” Certainly there is a dreamlike quality about Kipniss’ mature work that attracts the viewer’s eye through the immediate recognition of something vaguely familiar… almost like déjà vu. The elements of recognition, familiarity, and time – along with the artist’s thoughtful elimination of superfluous detail – give the work a timeless quality that is at once compelling and often haunting.

In fact, Kipniss does paint from memory and from his imagination. Many of his landscape paintings call upon visual recollections from his college years in Springfield, Ohio, from long walks in Central Park in the 1950s & ‘60s, and from more recent observations in the countryside of northwestern Connecticut where he currently spends time on weekends. All of his contemporary work is created north of New York City in a studio high above the Hudson River in which the windows have been blacked out as if to eliminate the distractions of the mundane world beyond his canvas. Artistic license notwithstanding, it seems clear that the nature of Kipniss’ recollection is more poetic than documentary, and that his carefully and elegantly composed tonal canvases rely more on his personal artistry than on precise memory.

The imagery in Kipniss’ paintings – the small town Main Street, the naked branches of a copse of trees in winter, or the tea kettle and cup, for example – carries with it associations that are distinctly different to each viewer: yet, these associations are meaningful to all of us on both on a conscious, and – most importantly – on a subconscious level. It is this connection between artist and viewer that makes Kipniss’ work at once so thematically universal and so psychologically charged. It is because the paintings are so rich with meaningful associations that connect to each our own personal histories, that they live a life beyond the quiet beauty that is immediately evident.

Although several early works will be included for the sake of providing context, ACME Fine Art’s first solo exhibition of paintings by Robert Kipniss will be principally comprised of work created since 2003. A number of paintings forming ACME Fine Art’s exhibition were a part of the artist’s 2005 retrospective exhibition at the New Orleans Museum of Art and are illustrated in the monograph that accompanied that exhibition. This occasion marks the first time that most have been exhibited since then, and the first time that they have been offered for sale. We are delighted and honored to represent Robert Kipniss, and we are deeply grateful to him for making this exhibition possible.

ACME Fine Art’s exhibition ROBERT KIPNISS: PAINTINGS will be featured here at www.acmefineart.com.

For further information about this exhibition or other gallery events, please contact the gallery at 617.585.9551, or via e-mail at info@acmefineart.com.