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Edwin W. Dickinson

Edwin W. Dickinson 

(1891-1978)

[Edwin Dickinson]

Education
Pratt Institute Art School
National Academy of Design
Art Students League
Buffalo Fine Arts Academy and with William M. Chase and Charles Hawthorne

Selected Exhibitions
Corcoran Gallery of Art, 1916, 1928-‘57
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, 1917-’22,‘29-’31,‘44-’49,’60,’64, ’66 (solo), 2003 (solo)
National Academy of Design, 1918,’49,’82,’89-92, 2003 (solo)
Luxembourg Museum, Paris, 1919
Art Institute of Chicago, 1920
Carnegie Institute, 1921
Jeu de Pomme, Paris, 1938
Albright [Knox] Art Gallery, 1927 (solo), 2002 (solo)
Museum of Modern Art, 1938,’43,’52,’54,’61-’63, ’76
Whitney Museum of American Art, 1965 (solo),’66
Brooklyn Museum of Art
World’s Fair of New York, 1964
Everson Museum of Art, 1977
Joseph Hirshhorn Museum, 1980(solo)

Selected Collections
National Museum of American Art
Museum of Modern Art
Whitney Museum of American Art
Art Institute of Chicago
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
National Academy of Design
Philadelphia Museum of Art
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts
Baltimore Museum of Art
Corcoran Gallery of Art
Albright-Knox Art Gallery
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Chrysler Museum of Art
Joseph Hirshhorn Museum

Biography
Edwin Dickinson (October 11, 1891–December 1, 1978) was an American painter and draftsman known for his psychologically charged self-portraits and landscapes. His art, always grounded in realism, shows connections to symbolism and surrealism. Dickinson was born and raised in upstate New York, in the Finger Lakes area; his family moved to Buffalo in 1897. The death of his mother from tuberculosis in 1903, the suicide in 1913 of his older brother, Burgess, and his father’s remarriage in 1914 to a much younger woman have all been cited as influences on the themes of his later work. Dickinson had youthful ambitions for a career in the Navy, but he failed the Navy entrance exam twice (though he later served as a radio operator during World War I). In 1911 he enrolled at the Art Students League of New York, where he studied under William Merritt Chase. In the summers of 1912 and 1913 he stayed in Provincetown, Massachusetts, where he took a class taught by Charles W. Hawthorne. After concluding his formal studies in 1913, Dickinson lived and taught in Provincetown for several years. His mature paintings can be roughly divided into two categories: The first consists of portraits, still lifes and landscapes executed quickly, often at a single sitting (the artist referred to these as premiere coups); the second is comprised of compositions of symbolic and enigmatic character, often large in size and very complex, which sometimes took many years to complete. While his palette tended towards monochrome, his landscapes painted from observation are notable for their strong evocation of light, which is usually hazy but sometimes brilliant. His paintings are often allusively autobiographical in content. His drawings in graphite are notable for their sensitivity to tonal nuance.

Artist Biography: Myron Stout

MYRON STOUT (1908-1987)

PUBLIC COLLECTIONS

Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY
Brooklyn Museum, New York
Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh
Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas, TX
De Menil Collection, Houston
Grey Art Gallery, New York University, New York
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Museum of Modern Art, New York
The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
Seattle Art Museum, Washington
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
Portland Art Museum, Portland, ME

PRIVATE COLLECTIONS

William H. Alexander
Whitney Armstrong
Richard Brown Baker
Richard Bellamy
Charles H. Carpenter, Jr.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Douglas III
Martha Edelheit
Linda Eisinger
Dr. and Mrs. Aaron H. Esman
Jackie Fowler
Kenneth Freed
Mr. and Mrs. B.H. Friedman
Mr. and Mrs. Gary Galkin
Agnes Gund
Susan Harris
William Hokin
Flora M. Irving
Philip Johnson
Dody Muller
Maia Muller
McCrory Corporation
Barbara Onorati
La Riviere Collection, Montreal
Louisa Sarofim
Sanford Schwartz and Carol Obedin
Roberta Smith
Tiffany Bell

SOLO EXHIBITIONS

1954- “Myron Stout Paintings” Stable Gallery, New York, April 5-24
1957- “Myron Stout: Drawings-Paintings” Hansa Gallery, New York, March 4-23
1977- “Myron Stout: Paintings and Drawings” Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston,
May 14-July 30
1980- “Myron Stout” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, February 5 – April 6
“Myron Stout Drawings” Cherrystone Gallery, Wellfleet, MA, July 26 – August 8
1990- “Myron Stout: Pathways and Epiphanies” Dia Art Foundation, Bridgehampton, NY,
July 21-October 7
1992- “Myron Stout: Landscape Drawings” Washburn Gallery, NY, April 2 – May 29
“Myron Stout” Oil & Steel Gallery, Kent Fine Art, Flynn, October-December
1994- “Myron Stout: Paintings circa 1950″ Washburn Gallery, NY, January 29-March 12
1997- “Myron Stout: Paintings” Luhring Augustine Gallery, New York, May 2-June 6
“Myron Stout” Annamarie Verna Galerie, Zurich Switzerland, May 28-July 16
“Myron Stout: The Unfinished Paintings” Washburn Gallery, NY, October 29-
November 29
1998- “Myron Stout” Inverleith House, Edinburgh, Scotland June 14 – July 26
2002- “Myron Stout: Studies for Drawings” Washburn Gallery, NY, April 4 – May 18
2005- “Myron Stout: Paintings c. 1950,” Washburn Gallery, NY March 8 – April 16
2007- “Myron Stout: Paintings and Drawings,” Washburn Gallery, NY March 8 – April 21

SELECTED GROUP EXHIBITIONS

1955- “Benefit Exhibition” Hansa Gallery, New York, December 5-24
1958- “Lily Brody, Jean Follett, Myron Stout: Drawings” Hansa Gallery, New York,
May 12-31
“Annual Exhibition: Sculpture, Paintings, Watercolors Drawings”
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, November 15, 1958-January 4, 1959
“The 1958 Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Contemporary Painting and Sculpture” Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, December 5, 1958 – February 8, 1959
1959- “Recent Acquisitions” Museum of Modern Art, New York, January 30 – April 19
“Painting Since 1945: A Collection in the Making” Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, March 18 – April 19
“100 Works on Paper: I United States” Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston,
April 3 – May 3
1960- “Modern Classicism” David Herbert Gallery, New York, February 8-27
“New Talent in the USA, 1960″ Organized by the American Federation of the Arts,
New York. Traveled in the United States, April, 1960 – June, 1961.
“Gallery Group Show: Paintings, Sculptures and Drawings” The Green Gallery, New York, December 13, 1960 – January 7, 1961
1961- “Gallery Group Show: The Green Gallery, New York, May 30 – June 25
“Jean Follett, Mark Di Suvero, Claes Oldenburg, Lucas Samaras, Myron Stout”
The Green Gallery, New York, September 19-October 14
“Purism” David Herbert Gallery, New York, October 2 – 28
1962- Geometric Abstraction in America” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York,
March 20 – May 13
“Gallery Group Show” The Green Gallery, New York, April 10 -?
1963- “Black and White” Jewish Museum, December 12, 1963 – February 5, 1964
“The Classic Spirit in Twentieth Century Art” Sidney Janis Gallery, New York, February 4 – 29
1965- “Art of the 50’s and 60’s: Selections From the Richard Brown Baker Collection.” Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, CT, April 25 – July 5
1967- “Gallery Group Show” Noah Goldowsky Gallery, New York
1968- “Plus by Minus: Today’s Half Century” Albright Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo,
March 3 – 14
1969- “Thirty-first Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting”
Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., February 1 – March 16
“Selected Sculpture and Works on Paper” Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
October – November 14
1970- “Gallery Group Show” Noah Goldowsky Gallery, New York, May
“Art on Paper 1970″ Weatherspoon Art Gallery, Greensboro,
November 15 – December 20
1973- “American Drawings 1963 – 73″ Whitney Museum of American Art, New York,
May 25 – July 22
1975- American Art Since 1945: From the Collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Traveled to Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, MA, October 20 – November 30, and elsewhere in the United States through April 17, 1977
1976- “Tenth Street Days: The Co-ops of the 1950’s” Amos Eno, 14 Sculptors, Noho, Pliades and Ward-Nasse galleries, New York, December 20, 1976 – January 7, 1977
1977- “Permanent Collection: Thirty Years of American Art 1945 – 1975″
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, January 29 – October 23
“Provincetown Painters: 1890’s – 1970’s” Everson Museum of American Art, Syracuse, New York, April 1 – June 26th. Traveled to Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, August 15 – September 5
“Cape Cod as an Art Colony” Heritage Plantation of Sandwich, MA,
April 30 – October 16
“Works on Paper: American Art 1945 – 1975″ Organized by the Washington Art Consortium, Seattle. Traveled to museums in western Washington.
1978- “20th Century American Drawings: Five Years of Acquisitions (100 American Drawings and Works on Paper)” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, July 28 – October 1
“New England Connections” Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, November, 1978 – January,
1979- “Hans Hofmann as Teacher: His Student’s Drawings” Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, January 23 – March 4
1979- “Constructivism and the Geometric Tradition: Selections from the McCrory Corporation Collection. Organized by the McCrory Corporation, New York. Traveled to Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, October 14 – November 25, and in the United States and Japan through December 21, 1984
1980- “Geometric Tradition in American Painting: 1920 – 1980″ Rosa Esman and Marilyn Pearl Galleries, New York, April 8 – May 17
“Fiftieth Anniversary Gifts” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York,
April 8 – May 17
“Hans Hofmann as Teacher: Drawings by His Students” Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, August 1 – October 12
1981- “Contemporary Americans: Museum Collection and Recent Acquisitions”
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, January 29 – April 12
“Recent Acquisitions: Drawings” Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 19 – June 2
“The New Spiritualism: Transcendent Images in Painting and Sculpture” Oscarsson Hood Gallery, New York, September 9 – 26
“Drawing Acquisitions, 1978 – 1981″ Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
September 17 – November 15
“American Paintings and Sculptures: 1955 – 1981″ Oil and Steel Gallery, New York
October 20 – December 5
1982- “The Season in Review” Marisa del Re Gallery, New York, March 2-27
“Contemporary Painting and Sculpture II: 1950 – 1981″ Oil and Steel Gallery, New York
May 15 – June 30
“Exhibition of Works by Newly Elected Members and Recipients of Honors and Awards” American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, New York,
May 18 – June 13
“Sculpture Painting Drawing III” Oil and Steel Gallery, New York, October –
December 18
“In Our Time: Houston’s Contemporary Arts Museum 1948 – 82″ Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, October 23 – January 2, 1983
“Hans Hofmann As Teacher: Drawings by Hofmann and His Students.” Organized by the American Federation of Arts, New York. Traveled in the United States and Canada
1983- “Drawing Conclusions: A Survey of American Drawings, 1958 – 1983″ Daniel Weinberg Gallery, Los Angeles, January 29 – February 26
“New York to Bennington: Paintings” Suzanne Lemberg Usdan Gallery, Bennington College, Bennington VT, March 15 – 31
“Affinities: Myron Stout, Bill Jensen, Brice Marden, Terry Winters” Hayden Gallery, Massachussets Institute of Technology, Cambridge, May 7 – June 26
“Contemporary Sculptures, Paintings, Drawings (IV) : 1956 – 1983″
Oil and Steel Gallery, New York, May 17 – June 11, September 20 – October 15
“Black and White” Margo Leavin Gallery, Los Angeles, June 25 – August 13
1983- “Subtleties” Sutton Gallery, New York, December 1983 – January 14, 1984
“I Knew it to be So!” Forrest Bess, Alfred Jensen, Myron Stout: Theory and Visionary” New York Studio School, New York, March 30 – May 2. Traveled to Center for the Arts, Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA, May 18 – June 29
“Three Artist: Leslie, Stout, di Suvero” Oil and Steel Gallery, New York
September 18 – November 3
“Ec cen tric Im age(s)” Margo Leavin Gallery, Los Angeles, October 20 – November 24
1985- “Fortissimo! Thirty Years From the Richard Brown Baker Collection of Contemporary Art” Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, March 1 – April 28.
Traveled to San Diego Museum of Art, San Diego June 29 – August 11, and
Portland Museum of Art, Portland, OR, October 1 – November 10
“Phillip Johnson: Selected Gifts” Museum of Modern Art, New York, April 10 –
October 27
“Cinquant ans de dessins Americains: 1930 – 1980″ Organized by the Menil Collection, Houston. Traveled to Ecole National Superieure des Beaux Arts, Paris, May 3 – July 13, and Stadelsches Kunstinstitut und Stadtische Galerie, Frankfurt am Main, November 28, 1985 – January 26, 1986
“An Invitational” Condeso/Lawler Gallery, New York, June 18 – January 26, 1986
1985- “American Abstract Painting: 1960 – 1980″ Margo Leavin Gallery, Los Angeles
June 18 – August 24
1986- “Carol Dunham, Paul Feely, Gary Stephan, Myron Stout, Phillip Taaffe”
Donald Young Gallery, Chicago, May 2 – 31
“Structure/Abstraction” Hill Gallery, Birmingham, MI, May 31-June 26
“Major Acquisitions Since 1980: Selected Paintings and Sculpture”
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, September 18-November 30
“Hans Hofmann and His Legacy” Lever/Myerson Gallery, New York, October 15 – December 12
1987- “Metaphor: Myron Stout, Richard Tuttle, Richard Wentworth, Win Knowlton” Kent Fine Art, New York, February 12 – March 14
“Strong Statements in Black and White” James Goodman Gallery, New York,
October 6 – 31
1987- “Lead” Hirschl and Adler Modern, New York, December 3, 1987 – January 16, 1988
1988- “Vital Signs: Organic Abstraction from the Permanent Collection”
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, April 27 – July 17
1989- “Bilderstreit: Widerspruch, Einheit und Fragment in der Kunst Seit 1990″ Rheinhallen der Kolner Messe, Cologne, April 8 – June 28 Organized by Museum Ludwig, Cologne
“A Decade of American Drawings: 1980 – 1989″ Daniel Weinberg Gallery, Los Angeles
July 15 – August 26
“Art in Place: Fifteen Years of American Acquisitions”
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, July 27-October 22
1992- “Plane Truths”, Washburn Gallery, New York, February 18-March 28
1993- “Plane Truths”, Washburn Gallery, New York, September 8-October 9
“In a Classical Vein: Works from the Permanent Collection,”
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
1994- “Provincetown Prospects: The Works of Hans Hofmann and His Students”
Boston University Art Gallery, January 22-February 27, 1994
“Drawings from the 60s,” Pace Drawings, New York, December 2-January 7, 1995
1995- “Essence and Persuasion: The Power of Black and White,”
Anderson Gallery, Buffalo, New York, April 1-May 13
“Works on Paper,” Mathew Marks Gallery, New York
“From the Collection: Abstraction Pure & Simple,” Museum of Modern Art, New York
1996- “Texas Modern and Post-Modern,” The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
“Forrest Bess & Myron Stout, Paintings from the 50s” Galerie Daniel Blau, Munich
November 23, 1996-January 25, 1997
2003- “A Bend in the Road” Maier Museum of Art, Lynchburg, August 30 – November 30

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Seckler, Dorothy., “Can Painting be Taught?” Artnews 50, No. 1, March, 1951, pp. 39 – 40, 63 -64.
Feinstein, Sam., “Fortnight in Review: the Unified Image.” Art Digest 28, no. 1, April 1, 1954, p. 16.
Porter, Fairfield., “Reviews and Previews: Myron Stout.” Artnews 53, no. 2, April, 1957, p. 58.
Pollet, Elizabeth., “In the Galleries: Myron Stout.” Arts Magazine 31, no. 6, March, pp. 58 – 59.
Tyler, Parker., “Reviews and Previews: Myron Stout.” Artnews 56, no. 1, March, 1957, p. 12.
Butler, Barbara., “In the Galleries: Brody, Follett, Stout.” Arts Magazine 32, no. 9, June, 1958, p. 53.
Annual Exhibition: Sculpture, Paintings, Watercolors, Drawings. Exhibition catalog, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1958
The Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Contemporary Painting and Sculpture. Exhibition catalog, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, 1958 Introduction by Gordon Bailey Washburn.
Painting Since 1945: A Collection in the Making. Exhibition catalog, Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, 1959 (Richard Brown Baker Collection.)
Tillim, Sidney., “What Happened to Geometry?” Arts Magazine 33, no. 9, June, 1959, pp. 38 – 44
Canaday, John., New Talent USA: Painting.” Art in America 48, no. 1, Spring, 1960, pp. 22 – 29. Includes statement by the artist, p. 58. (“New Talent Artists: Statements and Statistics, Painters,” chosen by Dorothy C. Miller).
Sabbath, Lawrence., “Paul Lariviere.” Canadian Art 18, no. 3, May – June (special issue on collecting), pp. 170 – 73
Purism. Exhibition catalog, David Herbert Gallery, New York, 1961. Essay by Georgine Oeri.
Seuphor, Michel. Abstract Painting: Fifty Years of Accomplishment, from Kandinsky to the Present. New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1962.
Geometric Abstraction in America. Exhibition catalog, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1962. Essay by John Gordon.
Kaprow, Allan. “Impurity.” Artnews 61, no. 9, January, 1963, pp. 30 – 33, 52 – 55.
Black and White. Exhibition catalog, Jewish Museum, New York, 1963. Introduction by Ben Heller.
Sandler, Irving., “In the Art Galleries.” New York Post, December 29, 1963, magazine, p. 14l.
The Classic Spirit in Twentieth Century Art. Exhibition catalog, Sidney Janis Gallery, New York, 1964
American Drawings. Exhibition catalog, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1964. Essay by Lawrence Alloway.
Judd, Donald., “In the Galleries: American Drawings.” Arts Magazine 39, no. 2, November, 1965, p. 59
Art of the 50’s and 60’s: Selections from the Richard Brown Baker Collection. Exhibition catalog, Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, CT., 1965. Essay by Richard Brown Baker.
Plus by Minus: Today’s Half Century. Exhibition catalog, Albright Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, 1968. Essay by Douglas MacAgy.
Thirty-first Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting. Exhibition catalog, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1968.
Gold, Barbara., “Corcoran Biennial: New Sensibility in Washington.” Arts Magazine 43, no. 6, April, 1969, pp. 28 -31.
Selected Sculpture and Works on Paper. Exhibition catalog, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1969. Introduction by Thomas M. Messer.
Acconci, Vito., “Reviews and Previews: John Chamberlain, Burgoyne Diller, Mark di Suvero, Myron Stout.” Artnews 68, no. 9, January, 1970, p. 12.
American Drawings 1963 – 1973. Exhibition catalog, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1973. Essay by Elke M. Solomon.
Borden, Lizzie., “Art Economics and the Whitney Drawing Show.” Artforum 12, no. 2, October, 1973, pp. 85 – 88.
Schwartz, Sanford., “Myron Stout.” Artforum 13, no 7, March, 1975, pp. 38 – 43.
American Art Since 1945: From the Collection of the Museum of Modern Art. Exhibition catalog, Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1975. Essay by Alicia Legg
“The Talk of the Town: Ambassador.” New Yorker, November 10, 1975, p. 38.
Friedman, B.H., “Too Little Attention: Art Chronicle.” New Boston Review 2, no. 3, Winter/January, 1977, p. 17
Provincetown Painters: 1890’s – 1970’s. Exhibition catalog, Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, NY., 1977. Essays by Ronald A. Kuchta and Dorothy Gees Seckler.
Cape Cod as an Art Colony. Exhibition catalog, Heritage Plantation of Sandwich, MA., 1977. Introduction by H. R. Bradley Smith; essay by April Kingsley in collaboration with Fritz Bultman.
Ennis, Michael., “Review: Art.” Texas Monthly 5. no. 8, August, 1977, pp. 110, 112.
Tenth Street Days: The Co-ops of the 50’s. Exhibition catalog, Education and Art Service, Inc., New York, 1977. Introduction by Dore Ashton; essay by Joellen Bard.
Works on Paper: American Art 1945 – 1975. Exhibition catalog, The Washington Arts Consortium, Seattle, 1977.
Sandler, Irving., The New York School: The Painters and Sculptors of the Fifties. New York: Harper and Row, 1978.
Twentieth Century American Drawings: Five Years of Acquisitions. Exhibition catalog, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1978. Essay by Paul Cummings.
Days Lumberyard Studios: Provincetown 1914 – 1971. Exhibition catalog, Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, 1978. Essay by Ben Brooks.
Masheck, Joseph. “Pictures of Art.” Artforum 17, no. 9, May, 1979, pp. 26 – 37.
Maartens, Katherine., Myron Stout. Unpublished M.A. Thesis, Hunter College, New York, 1979 (Based on a Series of Taped Interviews).
Constructivism and the Geometric Tradition: Selections from the McCrory Corporation Collection. New York, 1979. Essay by Willy Rotzler.
Bell, Tiffany., “Myron Stout’s Complexity in Simplicity.” Artforum 18, no. 5, January, pp. 47 – 51.
Myron Stout. Exhibition catalog, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1980. Introduction by B.H. Friedman; essay by Sanford Schwartz; excerpts from the artist’s journals.
Rose, Barbara., “Talking About… Art: Big ‘Little Master.'” Vogue, February, 1980, p. 68.
Kramer, Hilton., “Art: Myron Stout Ushered into Limelight.” New York Times, February 8, 1980, p. C26.
Zimmer, William., “Myron Stout: The Whitney Museum.” Soho Weekly News, February 13, 1980, p. 25.
Rothschild, Judith., “Myron Stout at Whitney.” Art World 4, no. 6, February 15/March 15,1980, pp. 1, 4.
Marzorati, Gerald., “Artful Dodger.” Soho Weekly News, February 20, 1980, p. 22.
Rickey, Carrie., Uptown: Myron Stout.” Village Voice, February 25, p. 69.
Perl, Jed., “On Myron Stout.” Art in America 68, no. 3, March, 1980, pp. 107 – 111.
Ashbery, John., “Stylish Stouts.” New York Magazine, March 3, 1980, pp. 97 – 98.
Shuebrook, Ron., “Myron Stout.” Arts Magazine 54, no. 8, April, 1980, p. 9.
Hans Hofmann as Teacher: Drawings by His Students. Exhibition catalog, Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, 1980. Essays by Fritz Bultman and Cynthia Goodman.
The New Spiritualism: Transcendent Images in Painting and Sculpture. Exhibition catalog, Oscarsson Hood Gallery, New York, 1981. Introduction by April Kingsley.
Drawing Acquisitions, 1978 – 1981. Exhibition catalog, Whitney Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1981. Essay by Paul Cummings.
Schwartz, Sanford. The Art Presence. New York, Horizon Press, 1982.
Raynor, Vivien., “Contemporary Paintings and Sculpture II: Oil and Steel.” New York Times, June 25, 1982, p. C21.
In Our Times: Houston’s Contemporary Art’s Museum 1948 – 1982, Exhibition catalog, Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, 1982. Essay by Cheryl A. Brutvan.
Glueck, Grace. “The Artists’ Artists.” Artnews 81, no. 9, November, 1982, pp. 90 – 100.
New York to Bennington: Paintings. Exhibition catalog. Suzanne Lemberg Usdan Gallery, Bennington College, Bennington, VT, 1983. Essay by Emily Sorkin.
Affinities: Myron Stout, Bill Jensen, Brice Marden, and Terry Winters. Exhibition catalog, Hayden Gallery, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, 1983. Essay by Kathy Halbreich.
Baker, Kenneth. “Art/The Elective Affinities: Taking Stock of Anti-Expressionism.” Boston Phoenix, June 21, sec. 3, p. 5.
Subtleties, 1983. Exhibition catalog, Sutton Gallery, New York. Essay by Jeffrey Wechsler.
Raynor, Vivien., “Art: A Modest Survey Spotlighting ‘Subtleties’.” New York Times, December 30, 1983, p. C20.
I Knew it to be So!” Forrest Bess, Alfred Jensen, Myron Stout: Theory and the Visionary. Exhibition catalog, New York Studio School, New York, 1984. Traveled to Center for the Arts, Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA. Essays by John Yau, David Reed, Lawrence Luhring, and Thomas Hudspeth.
Brenson, Michael., “Three Artists: Leslie, Stout, di Suvero: Oil and Steel.” New York Times, May 25, 1984, p. C21.
Fortissimo! Thirty Years from the Richard Brown Baker Collection of Contemporary Art. Exhibition catalog, Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, 1985. Essay by Richard Brown Baker.
Cinquante ans de dessins Americains: 1930 – 1980. Exhibition catalog, Menil Foundation, Houston, 1985. Introduction by Walter Hopps; catalog by Walter Hopps and Neil Printz.
Raynor, Vivien., “An Invitational: Condeso/Lawler Gallery.” New York Times, July 26, 1985, p. C22.
Stout, Myron., “Selections from the Journal of Myron Stout.” New Observations, 1985, no. 37, pp. 13 – 21. Selected by Tiffany Bell.
Stout, Myron. “Journal Excerpts, 1950 – 54.” Shankpainter 26, Spring, 1986, pp. 49 -52.
Hans Hofmann and His Legacy. Exhibition catalog, Lever/Myerson Gallery, New York, 1986. Essay by Cynthia Goodmman.
Painting and Sculpture Acquisitions, 1973 – 1986. Catalog, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1986. Essay by Patterson Sims.
Metaphor: Myron Stout, Richard Tuttle, Richard Wentworth, Win Knowlton. Exhibition catalog, Kent Fine Art, New York, 1987. Introduction by Susan Harris.
Stout, Myron. “Myron Stout: Selections from the Artist’s Journals.” Provincetown Arts 3, no. 1, Summer, 1987, pp. 80 – 82.
Brenson, Michael., “Myron Stout, Abstract Artist and Minimalist is Dead at 79.” New York Times, August 8, 1987 p. 50.
Lead, Exhibition catalog, Hirschl and Adler Modern, New York, 1987. Introduction by Klaus Kertess.
Smith, Roberta., “‘Lead': Hirschl and Adler Modern.” New York Times, January 15, 1988, p. C24.
Bomb, no. 22, Winter, 1988, pp. 38 – 39, ill.
Vital Signs: Organic Constructions from the Permanent Collection. Exhibition catalog, Whitney Museum of American Art., New York, 1988. Essay by Lisa Phillips.
Bilderstreit: Widerspruch, Einheit und Fragment in der Kunst Seit 1960. Exhibition catalog, Whitney
Museum of American Art, New York, 1989. Essays by Tom Armstrong and Susan C. Larsen.
Russell, John., “One and a Half Decades of Whitney Acquisitions.” New York Times, July 28, 1989. p. C22.
Russell, John., “Adding Up Costs of Changes at the Top.” New York Times, March 18, 1990, sec. 2, pp. 37 – 39.
Myron Stout: Pathways and Epiphanies. Exhibition catalog, Dia Art Foundation, New York, 1990. Introduction and essay by Henry Geldzahler.
Braff, Phyllis., “Emotional Skies and Forms.” New York Times, August 5, 1990, sec. 12, p. L.I. 13.
Myron Stout. Exhibition catalog, Inverleith House, Edinburgh, Scotland, 1992

Artist Biography: Peter Busa

Peter Busa
(1914-1985)

Education
Carnegie Institute of Technology, with Simboli, Rosenberg, Kostello, Benton
Art Students League
Hans Hofmann School of Fine Art

Member
College Art Association of America
Artists Equity Association (president, Minnesota Chapter, 1962-65)
Art Students League

Teaching Appointments
1945-1953 New York University
1945-1954 Cooper Union
1954-1957 State University of New York at Buffalo
1960-1983 University of Minnesota, Minneapolis

Selected Exhibitions
1939 Worlds Fair, “American Art Today,” New York, NY
1940 Art Institute of Chicago
1943 Art of This Century, New York, NY
1944 Ashby Gallery, “Colors Plays a Part,” New York, NY
1945 Art of This Century, “Autumn Salon,” New York, NY
Ashby Gallery, “Ashby, Busa, Cavallon,” New York, NY
1946 Art of this Century, New York, NY (SOLO)
Gallery Neuf, “8 and the Totem Pole,” New York, NY
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, Philadelphia, PA
Whitney Museum of American Art, Annual, New York, NY 1948, ’50, ’53, ’56, ’59, ‘72
1947 University of Iowa, “3rd Summer Exhibition of Contemporary Art,” Iowa City, IA
1948 Bertha Schaefer Gallery, New York, NY (SOLO), 1950-1953
1949 Brooklyn Museum, New York, NY
Santa Barbara Museum, Santa Barbara, CA
Forum 49, Provincetown, MA
Bertha Schaefer Gallery, New York, NY, 1950, ‘51
1950 American Federation of Art, New York, NY
1951 St. Louis Museum, St. Louis, MO
Ninth Street Exhibition, New York, NY
1952 Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, PA
1953 Brooklyn Museum, New York, NY
1955 Albright Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY, 1957
1956 Poindexter Gallery, “The 30s: Painting in New York” 1957 Albright Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY
William Hengerer Prize, Albright Art Gallery
1958 Martha Jackson Gallery, Provincetown, MA
Chrysler Art Museum, Provincetown, MA (SOLO), 1960, ’64, ‘70
Knoedler Gallery, “A to Z in American Art,” New York
1960 Cape Cod Art Association, Hyannis, MA (SOLO)
1962 Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN (SOLO), 1967
1963 Iowa State College, Ames, IA (SOLO)
1964 Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN
1965 Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC
Tweed Gallery, Dutch, MN (SOLO)
1966 University of Tennessee, “4th Annual National Invitational,” Knoxville, TN
University of Minnesota Gallery, Minneapolis (SOLO)
Special Donor Award, Walker Art Center
1968 University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN
1970 Minneapolis Institute of Art, Minneapolis, MN, 1978, ’79, ‘99
1971 Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, NY, 1973, ’79, ’83, ’88, ’96, 2001
1972 Kansas State University Gallery, Manhattan, KS (SOLO)
1975 Wisconsin State University, Eau Claire, WI (SOLO)
1977 Everson Museum of Art, “Provincetown Painters,” Syracuse, NY
American Academy in Rome, Rome, Italy
Parsons School of Design, New York, NY
Minneapolis Institute of Art, Minneapolis, MN (SOLO)
Rutgers University Art Gallery, “Surrealism and American Art: 1931- 1947,” New Brunswick, NJ
Guggenheim Fellowship
1978 Provincetown Art Association and Museum, MA
1979 Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY
Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, OH

Selected Museum Collections
Albright-Knox Art Gallery
Brandeis University, Rose Art Museum
Butler Institute of American Art
Cape Museum of Fine Arts
Chaim Gross Studio Museum
Chrysler Museum of Art
Colby College Museum of Art
Cooper Union Museum
Cornell University
Dayton Art Institute
Everson Museum of Art
Federal Reserve Bank, Minneapolis
Solomon Guggenheim Foundation
Peggy Guggenheim Collection
Guild Hall Museum
Iowa State University, Brunnier Art Museum
La Jolla Museum of Art
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Michigan State University, Kresge Art Museum
Minneapolis Institute of Art
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institute
Parrish Art Museum
Portland Art Museum
Provincetown Art Association & Museum
Reading Public Museum
Rutgers University, Zimmerli Art Museum
Slater Memorial Museum
Smith College, Museum of Art
Syracuse Museum of Art
University of Massachusetts, Boston
University of Minnesota at Duluth, Tweed Museum of Art
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Weisman Art Museum
University of North Carolina, Ackland Art Museum
University of Oregon, Museum of Art
University of Wisconsin, Elvehjem Museum of Art
Walker Art Center
Whitney Museum of American Art
Worchester Art Museum

Biography

Peter Busa was a central figure in the New York School, a truly original thinker, and a pioneer of modern art. Though difficult to categorize, his work was clearly influenced by his close associations with Matta, Pollock, Motherwell, Baziotes, Kamrowski, and Hofmann.

His early work is of two types. The first was based on the automatic technique of the Surrealists. The paintings of this type rely heavily on poured or dripped paint and date from the mid-forties typically. The second type of painting was more geometric -often angular- and these paintings were heavily influenced by Native American design motifs. These are commonly referred to as “Indian Space paintings.” Busa’s Indian Space paintings date from the late thirties to the late fifties. After abandoning Indian Space for styles more closely akin to straightforward abstract expressionism and geometric abstraction during the sixties and seventies, Busa returned to an evolved form of Indian Space painting in the eighties.

In his introduction to the catalogue for Peter Busa’s 50 year retrospective exhibition: Life Colors Art, Robert Metzger summarized Busa’s career by saying: “…Busa has presented problems for…art historians since his highly original and diverse body of work and his mastery of styles…have made him difficult to pigeonhole. His expansive repertory of forms defies translation into verbal language for they reveal truths which cannot be expressed in words. …despite his successful exhibitions with such leading galleries as Peggy Guggenheim, Carlebach, and Bertha Schaefer he [has not yet] made it into the celebrity bandwagon of dealers,…collectors, and the art press. The personal poetry and awesome range and depth of his body of work remains one of the great undiscovered treasures of Twentieth Century American art….”

Artist Biography: Robert De Niro Sr.

Robert De Niro Sr. 

(1922-1993)

Education

1938 Studies with Ralph Pearson
1940 Studies with Joseph Albers
1941-42 Hans Hofmann School of Fine Art, New York & Provincetown, MA

Selected Solo Exhibitions

1946 Art of this Century, Peggy Guggenheim Gallery, New York, NY
1954 Charles Egan Gallery, New York, NY, also 1950, 1953
1955 Poindexter Gallery, New York, NY. Also 1956, 1976
1958 Zabrinskie Gallery, New York, NY. Also 1960, 1962, 1965, 1967, 1968
1963 Five American Paintings, Knoedler Gallery, New York, NY
1967 State University of New York, Buffalo, NY
1969 Bard College, Annandale on the Hudson, NY
Reese Palley Gallery, San Francisco, CA
1971 Brenner Gallery, Provincetown, MA
1973 Zoller Gallery, Pennsylvania State University, PA
1974 Lithographs, Kansas City Art Institute, Kansas City, KS
1978 David Stuart Gallery, Los Angeles, CA
Works on Paper, Arts Gallery, Baltimore, MD
William Grappo Gallery, Swain School of Design, New Bedford, MA
Charles Campbell Gallery, San Francisco, CA. Also 1979
1979 Graham Modern Gallery, New York, NY. Also 1980, 1982, 1984, 1986
1980 Hobart Smith College, MA
1981 Mint Museum, Charlotte, NC
Ashville Art Museum, Asheville, NC
1983 David Hamilton Gallery, Charleston, NC
1984 Art Center in Hargate, St. Paul’s School, Concord, NH
1986 Contemporary Arts Center, Great Falls, MT
Cane Kalman Gallery, London, England
1994 Salander O’Reilly Galleries, New York, NY. Also 1996, 1997, 2000, 2005
1998 Yoshii Gallery, Tokyo, Japan
Hackett-Freedman Gallery, San Francisco, CA. Also 2000, 2006
1999 Galerie Piltzer, Paris, France
2002 La Galerie Metta, Madrid, Spain

Selected Group Exhibitions

1956 Second Generation, New York, Whitney Annual, Jewish Museum, New York, NY
1959 100 Americans on Paper, Institute of Contemporary Arts, Boston, MA

1960 Figure in Contemporary Painting, American Federation of Arts, New York, NY

Nebraska Art Association, Lincoln, NE
1961 7th Annual Drawing and Sculpture Show, Ball State Teachers College, Muncie, IN
Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center Annual, Colorado Springs, CO
1962 Recent Figure, Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY
The Figure, Kornblee Gallery, New York, NY
Illinois Wesleyan Annual, Bloomington, IL
1965 Portraits from the American Art World, New School Center, New York, NY
1969 Hommage to Matisse, Borgenicht Gallery, New York, NY
1971 A New Consciousness, The Ciba-Geigy Collection, Ardsley, NY
1975 Reese Palley Gallery, Atlantic City, NJ/San Francisco, CA
1976 Buecker Gallery, New York, NY
1977 The Art of Pastel, Graham Gallery, New York, NY
1978 Provincetown Art Association, Provincetown, MA
Bell Gallery, Brown University, Providence, RI
1982 The Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, OH
1984 20th Century American Drawings: The Figure in Context, Terra Museum of American Art, Washington, DC
Modern Masters of Classical Realism, University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh, WI
Woman: A Changing Picture, Graham Gallery, New York, NY
Art Museum Association of America, San Francisco, CA
1985 Summer Yellows, Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY
Small Works, Fine Works, Graham Modern, New York, NY
The Members of the Gallery, Albright–Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY
1986 Survival of the Fittest II: Figurative Work on Paper, Ingber Gallery, New York, NY
Form or Formula, Drawing & Drawings, The Hudson River Museum, Yonkers, NY
1992 Color as Subject, The Artists Museum, The Police Building, New York, NY
1993 Monumental Nudes, Salander-O’Reilly Galleries, New York, NY
1995 American Masters of Watercolor: A 100 Year Survey, Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art, Loretto, PA
1998 Seeing the Essential: Selected Works by Robert De Niro, Sr., Leland Bell, and Paul Resika, Hackett-Freedman Gallery, San Francisco, CA
2000 Reconfiguring the New York School, Center for Figurative Painting, New York, NY
Selected Works by Paul Resika, Robert De Niro, Sr., Terry St. John and Dennis Hare, Hackett-Freedman Gallery, San Francisco, CA
2002 Galeria Metta, Madrid, Spain

2003 Paul Resika and Robert De Niro, Sr.: Selected Works, Hackett-Freedman Gallery, San Francisco, CA

Watercolor, Schweinfurth Memorial Art Center, Auburn, NY
Gallery Selections, Salander-O’Reilly Galleries, New York, NY
2004–07 The Most Difficult Journey: The Poindexter Collection of American Modernist Paintings, The Yellowstone Art Museum, Billings, MT (traveling exhibition)
2004 ACA Galleries, New York, NY
Galleria d’Arte Benucci, Rome, Italy
2006 Aspects of Humanity, Center of Contemporary Art, Sacramento, CA
2009 Days Lumberyard Studios: 1915-1972, ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA

Selected Collections

Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC
Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY
Rhode Island School of Design Museum (RISD), Providence, RI
The Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, MD
Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC
Arkansas Art Center, Little Rock, AK
Denver Art Museum, Denver, CO
Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, NY
Mint Museum, Charlotte, NC
Oakland Museum of California, Oakland, CA
Chase Manhattan Bank, New York, NY
CIBA-GEIGY Corporation, Ardsley, NY
Yellowstone Art Center, Billings, MT
Parrish Art Museum, South Hampton, NY
Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, MA
University Art Collections, Tempe, AZ

Biography

Poet, sculptor and artist Robert De Niro, Sr. became known during the postwar era for his dynamic, richly-colored paintings that gracefully synthesized modernist abstraction with more traditional compositions and formal themes.

Born in Syracuse, New York in 1922, De Niro was passionate about art from an early age. While still in high school, he attended art classes at the Syracuse Museum, where he was provided with a private room where he could paint independently. In addition to his early studies with etcher Ralph Pearson, he had the good fortune of studying under two of the 20th century’s leading colorists: first with Joseph Albers at Black Mountain College (1940), and later with Hans Hofmann (1941-42).

His work reflects his extensive training with these masters, as well as a strong reverence for the French avant-garde painters who influenced them. The long broken brushstrokes of Derain, the bold, lyrical contours of Matisse, and the modernist non-perspectival compositions of Bonnard are each clear inspirations in De Niro’s best works.

While studying with Hofmann at his Provincetown summer school, De Niro met painter Virginia Admiral, whom he married in 1942. The couple moved into a large, airy loft in New York’s Greenwich Village, where they were able to paint. Their illustrious circle of friends included writers Anais Nin and Henry Miller, playwright Tennessee Williams, and actress and famous Berlin dancer Valeska Gert who modeled for Hofmann’s classes. Admiral and De Niro separated shortly after their son, Robert De Niro, Jr. was born in December of 1943.

A perfectionist, De Niro Sr. often painted and repainted his canvases, completing hundreds of studies of the same composition until he was pleased with his work. He was meticulous with his choice of pigment, always searching for the perfect colors and rarely satisfied.

De Niro Sr.’s first solo exhibition was held at Peggy Guggenheim’s Art of this Century, New York, in 1946, when he was twenty-four years old. He exhibited frequently throughout the 1950s at the Charles Egan Gallery, where his work hung alongside de Kooning, Kline, and Guston.

In the early 1960s, De Niro Sr, looking for fresh inspiration, abandoned New York for Paris. As his work continued to evolve and mature, he sold fifty oil paintings and works on paper to the collector Joseph Hirshhorn, and received much critical praise, as well as a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1968.

The political and cultural climate began to change in the mid-60s, however, and Pop Art eclipsed many artists working in a more traditional vein. Though the mainstream success of his contemporaries eluded De Niro Sr., he continued his brilliant exploration of color and form until he passed away in 1993, leaving behind a vibrant oeuvre that is included in museum collections such as: the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, and the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Museum of Modern Art, New York, among others. In 1995, his son, award-winning actor Robert De Niro, Jr., along with his mother, Virginia Admiral, honored the late painter by supporting an exhibition of his works at the Salander-O’Reilly Gallery in New York.

HansHofmann_teacher

Hans Hofmann

Hans Hofmann
(1880-1966)

Exhibitions

University of California, 1931
California Palace of the Legion of Honor, 1931
Isaac Delgado Museum of Art, New Orleans, 1941
The Arts Club of Chicago, 1944
Cincinnati Art Museum, Ohio, 1944
Denver Art Museum, 1944
Seattle Art Museum, 1944
Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1944
San Francisco Museum of Art, 1944
67 Gallery, New York, 1944
Art of This Century Gallery, New York, 1944
Mortimer Brandt Gallery, New York, 1944
University of Illinois, 1944
Milwaukee Art Institute, Wisconsin, 1945
67 Gallery, New York, 1945
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1945
American Contemporary Gallery, Hollywood, CA, 1946
Addison Gallery of American Art, MA, 1947
The Art Institute of Chicago, 1947
Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, 1947
University of Oklahoma, 1947
Memphis Academy of Arts, 1947
Betty Parsons Gallery, New York, 1947
Kootz Gallery, New York, 1947
Whitney Museum of American Art, 1947
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, 1951
Sidney Janis Gallery, New York, 1951
The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1951
Albright Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY, 1952
Baltimore Museum of Art, 1954
Bennington College, Vermont, 1955
Museo Nacional de Arte Moderna, Palacio de las Bellas Artes, Mexico City,
1960
XXX Venice Biennale, Venice, 1960
American Federation of Arts traveling exhibition, 1961
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1961
Hopkins Center, Dartmouth College, New Hampshire, 1962
International House, Denver, 1963
The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1963
Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Santa Barbara, 1963
Worth Ryder Art Gallery, University of California, Berkeley, 1964
American Art Gallery, Copenhagen Denmark, 1964
Tate Gallery, London, 1964
San Francisco Museum of Art, 1965
Stanford Art Museum, CA, 1966
National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, 1966
Andre Emmerich Gallery, New York, 1967
Richard Gray Gallery, Chicago, 1968
Martha Jackson Gallery, New York, 1968
New York: Everson Museum, Syracuse, 1969
David Mirvish Gallery, Toronto, 1969
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1970
Waddington Galleries III, London, 1973
The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1973
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C., 1975
Museum of Modern Art, Oxford, England, 1977
Kunstmuseum, Bern, 1979
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1979
Haus der Kunst, Munich, 1981
Vatican Museums and International Exhibitions Foundation, Rome, 1984
Yares Gallery, Scottsdale, AZ, 1984
The Fort Worth Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas, 1985
C. Grimaldis Gallery, Baltimore, 1986
Lever/Meyerson Galleries, Ltd., New York, 1986
The Tate Gallery, London, 1988
Marianne Friedland Gallery, Toronto, 1988
Boston University Art Gallery, Boston, 1994
Sezon Museum of Art, Tokyo, 1996
Jason mcCoy, Inc., New York, 1998
Ameringer/Howard Fine Art, Boca Raton, FL, 1999
Manny Silverman Gallery, Los Angeles, CA, 1999
Seattle Art Museum, 1999
Berta Walker Gallery, Provincetown, MA, 2000
Provincetown Art Association and Museum, MA, 2000
The Newark Museum, NJ, 2001
Portland Art Museum, Portland, Oregon, 2001
John Berggruen Gallery, San Francisco, CA, 2001

Biography

Hans Hofmann (1880-1966) is one of the most important figures of postwar American art. Celebrated for his exuberant, color-filled canvases, and renowned as an influential teacher for generations of artists—first in his native Germany, then in New York and Provincetown—Hofmann played a pivotal role in the development of Abstract Expressionism.

As a teacher he brought to America direct knowledge of the work of a celebrated group of European modernists (prior to World War I he had lived and studied in Paris) and developed his own philosophy of art, which he expressed in essays which are among the most engaging discussions of painting in the twentieth century, including “The Color Problem in Pure Painting—Its Creative Origin.” Hofmann taught art for over four decades; his impressive list of students includes Helen Frankenthaler, Red Grooms, Alfred Jensen, Wolf Kahn, Lee Krasner, Louise Nevelson and Frank Stella. As an artist Hofmann tirelessly explored pictorial structure, spatial tensions and color relationships. In his earliest portraits done just years into the twentieth century, his interior scenes of the 1940s and his signature canvases of the late 1950s and the early 1960s, Hofmann brought to his paintings what art historian Karen Wilkin has described as a “range from loose accumulations of brushy strokes…to crisply tailored arrangements of rectangles…but that somehow seems less significant than their uniform intensity, their common pounding energy and their consistent physicality.”

HansHofmann_teacher

Chronology
1880 Hans Hofmann is born in Weissenburg in Bavaria, Germany, on March 21. His father
Theodor Hofmann, a government official, and his mother Franciska, the daughter of
a prominent brewer and wine producer, have three sons and two daughters. Hans
was the second son.
1886 The family moves to Munich. Hofmann attends public schools and develops special
interests in mathematics, science, and music. He plays the violin, piano and organ
and begins to draw.
1896 With his father’s help, finds a position as assistant to the director of public works of
the state of Bavaria. Patents several scientific inventions.
1898 Studies painting with Willi Schwarz, who introduces him to Impressionism, at Moritz
Heymann’s art school in Munich.
1900 Meets Maria “Miz” Wolfegg, his future wife.
1903 Through Willi Schwarz, he meets Phillip Freudenberg, the nephew of a Berlin
collector, who becomes his patron from 1904 to 1914 and enables him to live in
Paris (though he often summers in Germany).
1904 Frequents the Café du Dome, a haunt of artists and writers, with Jules Pascin, a
friend from Mortiz Heymann’s school. Miz joins him in Paris. Attends evening sketch
classes at the école de la Grand Chaumière and the Académie Colarossi. Meets
Picasso, Braque and Matisse.
1908 Exhibits with the Neue Sezession in Berlin, and again in 1909.
1910 First one-person exhibition held at Paul Cassirer Gallery, Berlin. Meets and befriends
Robert Delaunay.
1914 Hofmann and Miz leave Paris for Corsica to recuperate from what proves to be
tuberculosis. Called to Germany by the illness of his sister, they are forced by the
outbreak of World War I to remain in the country. Financial assistance from Phillip Freudenberg ends.
1915 Ineligible for the army because of the aftereffects of his lung condition, and with
Freudenberg’s assistance terminated by the war, Hofmann decides to earn a living
by teaching. Opens the Schule für Bildenes Kunst in Munich.
1918 After the war his school becomes known abroad and attracts foreign students.
Between 1922 and 1929 holds summer sessions in Bavaria, Yugoslavia, Italy and
France. Makes frequent trips to Paris. Has little time to paint but draws continually.
1924 Marries Miz Wolfegg.
1930 At the invitation of former student Worth Ryder, teaches a summer session at the
University of California, Berkeley, where Ryder is an associate professor in the
Department of Art. Returns to Munich for the winter.
1931 In the spring, teaches at the Chouinard School of Art, Los Angeles, and again at
Berkeley in the summer. Exhibits drawings at the California Palace of the Legion of
Honor, San Francisco—his first one-person exhibition in the United States.
1932 Returns to Chouinard School of Art in the summer. Advised by Miz not to return to
Munich because of growing political hostility towards intellectuals, Hofmann settles
in New York. Former student Vaclav Vytlacil helps arrange a teaching position at
The Art Students League of New York.
1933 Spends the summer as a guest instructor at the Thurn School of Art in Gloucester,
Massachusetts. In the fall opens a school in New York at 444 Madison Avenue.
Begins to paint again.
1934 Upon the expiration of his visa, travels to Bermuda where he stays for several
months before returning to the United States with a permanent visa. Teaches again
at the Thurn School of Art. Opens the Hans Hofmann School of Fine Arts at 137
East 57th Street in New York.
1935 Opens a summer school in Provincetown, Massachusetts.
1936 Hofmann moves his school to 52 West Ninth Street in New York.
1938 The Hofmann School moves again to 52 West Eighth Street, its permanent home in
New York until 1958. Hofmann’s lecture series at the school in the winter of 1938-
39 is attended by such figures as Arshile Gorky and Clement Greenberg.
1939 Miz Hofmann arrives in America and joins her husband in Provincetown. From that
year on they spend five months each summer in Provincetown and the rest of the
year in New York.
1941 Becomes an American citizen. Delivers an address at the annual meeting of
American Abstract Artists at the Riverside Museum. Solo exhibition at the Isaac
Delgado Museum of Art, New Orleans.
1942 Lee Krasner, formerly a Hofmann student, introduces him to Jackson Pollock.
1944 First exhibition in New York at Peggy Guggenheim’s The Art of This Century Gallery.
Hans Hofmann, Paintings 1941-1944 opens at The Arts Club of Chicago and travels
to the Milwaukee Art Institute. Hofmann’s paintings are included in Forty American
Moderns at 67 Gallery and Abstract and Surrealist Art in America at the Mortimer
Brandt Gallery (arranged by Sidney Janis in conjunction with publication of Janis’
book of the same title) in New York. Meets critic Clement Greenberg. Close
friendship with author and critic Harold Rosenberg begins.
1945 Included in Contemporary American Painting at the Whitney Museum of American
Art, New York. Included in all subsequent Whitney painting annuals.
1947 Exhibits at Betty Parsons Gallery in New York, the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts and in
Pittsburgh. Begins to exhibit with the Kootz Gallery, New York, which would hold a
one-person show of Hofmann’s work each year (except 1948 and 1956) until the
artist’s death.
1948 Retrospective exhibition of his work at the Addison Gallery of American Art in
Andover, Massachusetts, in conjunction with publication of his book, The Search
for the Real and Other Essays.
1949 Travels to Paris to attend the opening of his exhibition at the Galerie Maeght and
visits the studios of Picasso, Braque, Brancusi and Miró. Helps Fritz Bultman and
Weldon Kees organize Forum 49, a summer series of lectures, panels and exhibitions
at Gallery 200 in Provincetown.
1950 Participates in a three-day symposium at Studio 35 with William Baziotes, James
Brooks, Willem de Kooning, Herbert Ferber, Theodoros Stamos, David Smith and
Bradley Walker Tomlin. Joins the “Irascibles,” a group of Abstract Expressionist
artists in an open letter protesting the exclusion of the avant-garde from an
upcoming exhibition of American art at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
1951 Juries the 60th Annual American Exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago with Aline
Louchheim and Peter Blume.
1954 Solo exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art.
1955 Clement Greenberg organizes a small retrospective of Hofmann’s paintings at
Bennington College in Vermont.
1956 Designs mosaic murals for the lobby of the new William Kaufmann Building, 711 Third
Avenue, New York. Retrospective held at the Art Alliance in Philadelphia.
1957 Retrospective exhibition held at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York,
traveling to Des Moines, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Seattle, Minneapolis, Utica
and Baltimore.
1958 Ceases teaching to devote himself full-time to painting. Moves his studios into his
former New York and Provincetown schools. Completes a mosaic mural for the
exterior of the New York School of Printing at 439 West 49th Street.
1960 Represents the United States with Philip Guston, Franz Kline and Theodore Roszac
at the XXX Venice Biennale.
1962 Retrospective exhibition opens at the Frankische Galerie am Marientor, Nuremburg
and travels to Cologne, Berlin and Munich. Exhibition Oils on Paper 1961-1962 opens
in Munich. Awarded Honorary Membership in the Akademie der Bildenden Kunste in
Nuremberg and an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree by Dartmouth College.
1963 Miz Hofmann dies. Retrospective exhibition Hans Hofmann and His Students
organized by William Seitz opens at The Museum of Modern Art and travels
throughout the United States, South America and Europe. Signs an agreement to
donate forty-five paintings to the University of California, Berkeley, and to fund the
construction of a gallery in his honor at the University’s new museum, then in the
planning stage.
1964 Receives an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree from the University of California,
Berkeley and the Solomon Guggenheim International Award. Becomes a member of
the National Institute of Arts and Letters, New York.
1965 Awarded an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree by Pratt Institute, New York.
Completes The Renate Series inspired by Renate Schmitz, whom he marries.
1966 Hans Hofmann dies on February 17 in New York

Hans Hofmann’s students: Lillian Orlowsky, William Freed, Haynes Ownby, Paul Resika, Myrna Harrison, Robert Henry, Selina Trieff, Lee Krasner, Israel Levitan, Helen Frankenthaler, I. Rice Pereira, Gerome Kamrowski, Michael Loew, Joseph Plaskett, Fritz Bultman, William Ronald, Joan Mitchell, Michael Goldberg, Ray Eames, Larry Rivers, Jane Frank, Mary Frank, Nell Blaine, Robert De Niro, Sr., Jane Freilicher, Allan Kaprow, Red Grooms, Wolf Kahn, Marisol Escobar, Sy Kattelson, Nicholas Krushenick, Burgoyne Diller, Mercedes Matter, James Gahagan, Erle Loran, Nancy Frankel, Paul Georges, Louisa Matthíasdóttir, Judith Godwin, Lynne Mapp Drexler, Roland Petersen, Ken Jacobs, Anton Weiss, Donald Jarvis and many others.

Myrna Harrison

Myrna Harrison
(1932-)

harrison

Education

2007 Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ ,”History of Chinese Painting,”
2000 Remnin University, Beijing, China, “Chinese Art and Culture”
1996-99 Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (“Chinese Painting of the Ming & Qing Dynasties,” “Chinese Ceramics,” “History of Asian Art”)
1960-64 University of California, Berkeley, CA (scholarship & teaching assistantship)
1960 Master of Arts, New York University, New York, NY (graduate scholarship)
1959 Bachelor of Arts (Magna cum Laude with Honors in English: minor in Fine Arts) –studied with Philip Guston — New York University, New York, NY
1953-57 Hans Hofmann School of Fine Art, New York, NY and Provincetown, MA (scholarship & monitor)
1952-53 Jack Tworkov, New York, NY (scholarship)
1951-52 Morris Davidson School of Fine Art, New York, NY and Provincetown, MA (scholarship)
1946-50 High School of Music and Art, New York, New York

Solo Exhibitions

2013 “Recent Paintings,” Gallery Ehva, Provincetown, MA
“Western Paintings: 1960-2012,” Desert Caballeros Western Museum, Wickenburg, AZ
2012 “Northeast by Southwest: The Lively Landscapes” Curated by James Burns, Robert Henry, and Selina Trieff, May 18-July 15, 2012, Provincetown, MA
“Look/Study,” Gallery Ehva, Provincetown, MA
2010 “Desertscapes: 2008-2010,”James Ratliff Gallery, Sedona, AZ
“Ocean & Desert,” Ehva Gallery, Provincetown, MA
2007 “New Works,” James Ratliff Gallery, Sedona, AZ
2005 “Desertscapes: 2004-2005,” James Ratliff Gallery, Sedona, AZ
“Looking Back,” Beauregard Fine Art, Rumson, NJ
2004 “Desertscapes -10 Years,” Glendale College, Glendale, AZ
“Desert Water Paintings,” Gold Nugget Art Gallery, Wickenburg, AZ
2002 “Desertscapes -2,” James Ratliff Gallery, Sedona, AZ
2001 “Desertscapes” James Ratliff Gallery, Sedona, AZ
1995 “Arizona Paintings,” Coconino Center for the Arts, Flagstaff, AZ
“Landscapes,” Cortland Jessup Gallery, Provincetown, M
1989 “Desertscapes,” Phoenix College, Phoenix, AZ
1994 “Landscapes,” Cortland Jessup Gallery, Provincetown, MA
1965 “Recent Work,” Derby Gallery, Berkeley, CA

Selected Group Exhibitions

2012 “Provincetown Views,” ACME Fine Arts, Boston, MA
2010 “Days Lumberyard,” Fine Arts Work Center, Provincetown, MA
2009 “In Search of the New: Hans Hofmann and His Students,” Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, MA; University Art Gallery,
University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, MA (2010); Sidney Mishkin Gallery, Baruch College, NYC (2010)
“Days Lumberyard Studios 1915-1972,” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
Cape Cod Museum of Art, Dennis, MA
2008 “Summer Salon,” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
2007 “Drawings from Hans Hofmann’s Figure Drawing Class,” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
2006 “Summer Salon,” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
“Provincetown Painters: Works on Paper,” Beauregard Fine Art, Rumson, NJ
2005 “Summer Salon,” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
“Teachers & Students,” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
“From the Collection: Hans Hofmann Students,” Cape Cod Museum of Art, Dennis, MA
2004 “Three Artist Exhibition,” James Ratliff Gallery, Sedona, AZ
“Provincetown Painters,” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
2002 “Hans Hofmann: Four Decades in Provincetown,” Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, MA
2000 “Hans Hofmann’s Students: Variety in Contemporary Art,” Cape Cod Museum of Art, Dennis, MA
“Gallery Artists’ Group Shows,” Cherrystone Gallery, Wellfleet, MA
“Gallery Artists’ Group Shows,” Waxlander-Khadouri Gallery, Santa Fe, NM
“Life – Form and Color: Provincetown-Koganei,” Gallery Brocken & Gallery Hasimoto , Koganie (Tokyo), Japan
“USA on Paper,” Odsgard Gallery, Copenhagen, Denmark
“Landscape Show,” Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, MA
1983-84 “RAFT – A Grand Canyon Landscape Exhibit” Scottsdalae Center for the Arts, Scottsdale, AZ; Coconino Center for the Arts, Flagstaff, AZ; Yuma Art Center, Yuma, AZ
“The Painters of the Sun Gallery,” Provincetown Art Association and Museum , Provincetown, MA
“The Lumberyard Painters,” Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, MA
“Tenth Street Days: the Co-ops of the 50’s” New York, NY
“Solo Exhibition,” Derby Gallery, Berkeley, CA
1960-65 “Group Shows,” Quay Gallery, Tiburon, CA; Richmond Art Center, Richmond, CA
1957 “Eight New Artists,” Artists Gallery, New York,
1955 “Billmyer, Harrison, Orlowsky,” James Gallery, New York, NY
“Fifteen Staten Island Artists,” Pietrantonio Gallery, New York, NY
1954-57 “Group Shows”: Staten Island Museum, Staten Island, NY; Cape Cod Art Association, Hyannis, Ma: Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, MA; Sun Gallery, Provincetown, MA
“International Watercolor Show,” Brooklyn Art Museum, Brooklyn, NY

Lectures, Teaching, Studio Tours:

2010 Panelist: “Robert Fisher,” Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, MA
2009 Panelist: “Hans Hofmann: Search for the Real,” Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, MA
Teaching: Visiting Artist, Vermont Studio Center, Johnson, VT
Tour of my studio, Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, Scottsdale, AZ
Tour of my studio, Arizona 5 Arts Circle, Scottsdale, AZ
2008 Teaching: Studio Workshop for High School Students, Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, Scottsdale, AZ
2007 Teaching: Workshop for Adults, Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, Scottsdale, AZ
2006 Lecturer: “Threshold: Brian Kim`1920-2004,” Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, Scottsdale, AZ
Teaching: Workshop for High School Students, Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, Scottsdale. AZ
2005 Teaching: Visiting Artist, Vermont Studio Center, Johnson, VT
2004 Teaching: Visiting Artist, Vermont Studio Center, Johnson, VT
Lecturer: “Joseph Albers – Seeing In Color,” Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, Scottsdale, AZ.
2003 Lecturer: “Hans Hofmann,” Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, Scottsdale, AZ

myrna_harrison

Collections

Cape Cod Museum of Art, Provincetown, MA
Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, MA
Rose Museum, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA
Private Collections throughout U.S., Canada, Japan

She is represented by

James Ratliff Gallery, Sedona, AZ
Beauregard Fine Art, Rumsfield, NJ
ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
Gallery Ehva, Provincetown, MA

Biography

1932 Born Hollywood, California. Father director and animator on animated cartoons for Columbia Pictures; mother hat designer.
1943 Family moved to New York City
1946 – 1950 Music and Art High School, New York, NY
1950 – 1951 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM
1951 – 1952 Morris Davidson School of Fine Art, New York City and Provincetown, MA (scholarship)
1952 – 1953 Studied painting with Jack Tworkov, New York, NY (scholarship)
1953 – 1957 Hans Hofmann School of Fine Art, New York, NY and Provincetown, MA (scholarship and monitor)
1954 – 1960 New York University, New York, NY.
1959 Bachelor of Arts (magna cum laude with honors in English – minor in Fine Arts – studied with Philip Guston) – scholarship
1960 Master of Arts – graduate scholarship
1960 – 1964 University of California, Berkeley, CA (scholarship & teaching assistanceship in English)
1965 – 1974 Taught English and Fine Arts in California community colleges
1974 – 1980 Dean of Instruction in California community colleges
1980 – 1993 Moved to Phoenix, AZ: President: Rio Salado Community College (1980-85); Gateway Community College (1985-88); Phoenix College (1988-93)
1993- present: Lives in Wickenburg, AZ in a studio overlooking a saguaro-filled canyon of the Sonoran desert.

Artist Statement

Oceans and deserts fascinate me. They share spacial openness, an unending skyline, subtle changes in form and color as the sun moves across the sky, and a demand that we adapt to them. They will not adapt to us. Both have an intense,vibrant presence — which is not surprising: deserts began life as oceans millions of years ago. I want my work to express that vibrant intensity.

My paintings usually grow out of pencil, ink, or charcoal drawings done on site. Some drawings are realistic, some abstract – but in all of them I try to catch the particular quality of that slice of desert or ocean. In my studio the paintings evolve from the on-site drawings, my memory, and the multitude of small drawings I do at night as I think about painting. Often a particular scene, drawing, or memory will absorb me and I will do ten or fifteen paintings of that particular place – each painting investigating a different aspect of the site and my response to it.

My work was influenced early by Cubism and the abstract expressionist painters Hans Hofmann, Willem de Kooning, and Franz Kline, later by the California figurative painters David Park and Richard Diebenkorn, and later still by Japanese prints and Chinese landscape painting. Chinese “splashed ink” paintings of the thirteenth century – the artist splashed ink on wet paper and let the irregular ink forms suggest a landscape that the artist would bring to life through a few brush strokes – has particularly interested me. Most recently I have been influenced by the Chinese aesthetic of the singular importance of the ink brush stroke for creating the basic form, subject and emotion of the painting. — Myrna Harrison, Wickenburg, AZ, May 2010

George McNeil

McNeil in Studio-1
Copyright by Helen McNeil, permission granted under Creative Common

George McNeil
(1908-1995)

George McNeil on Wikipedia
George McNeil on Facebook
Art and Antiques June 2014

George McNeil was one of the most important and influential New York School artists and teachers of his generation. There is no period during his six-decade long career in which his work is not highly regarded. McNeil’s work has been prominently and widely exhibited ever since his debut as one of only five non-objective painters in the New York World’s Fair Show of 1939. Today, his work can be found in such important collections as: the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, to name a few.

Looking back on his lengthy career, McNeil must be considered one of the preeminent American expressionist painters of the 20th Century. His work evolved successfully from the post cubist abstract expressionism of his Hofmann School days, through the figurative expressionism of his mid-career during the 1960’s and 1970’s, to emerge as full-blown neo-expressionism in the 1980’s and 1990’s. With “avant-gardism” as his watchword McNeil was always at the forefront of the American expressionist movement. His extraordinary body of work pays tribute to his enormous talent and his uncompromising commitment to artistic growth.

In a statement prepared for a solo exhibition of his work at the State University of New York at Binghamton in 1985 McNeil commented, “I have been told that my abstract landscapes and my beat up figures make me a part of the New Expressionist movement. This disconcerts me because I have been an old expressionist for so long that it isn’t funny. I am like Moliere’s Monsieur Jourdain who was surprised to learn he had been speaking prose all his life.”

 

George McNeil
(1908-1995)

Chronology:
1910 Born February 22, New York City to Irish-American working-class family.
1922-1926 Attends art classes at Brooklyn Museum while studying at Brooklyn Tech High School. Influenced by the museum’s Societe Anonyme collection containing works by Picasso, Matisse, Duchamp and Picabia.
1927 Wins New York Art League Scholarship and enters General Art Program, Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, NY.
1927–1932 Studies work by French Modernist artists and copies works in Metropolitan Museum of Art. Attends and is influenced by Vaclav Vytlacil’s lectures at the Art Students’ League, where he studies with Jan Matulka. Becomes acquainted with Arshile Gorky.
1932–1936 Studies with Hans Hofmann, first at Art Students’ League, then at Hofmann’s own school. Begins to develop his own theories of modern art. Friends with Mercedes (Carles) Matter, Lee Krasner, Rae (Kaiser) Eames, Giorgio Cavallon and John Opper.
1935 Joins the W.P.A. and serves on the Federal Art project with artists such as Willem de Kooning and James Brooks. Supported by Burgoyne Diller on Williamsburg Mural Project.
1936 Founder member of American Abstract Artists with Ibram Lassaw, Ilya Bolotowsky, Rosalind Bengelsdorf and others.
Combatting the rejection of contemporary American abstract art by museums, galleries and critics, the AAA publishes brochures and organizes annual exhibitions of works by members.
Marries fellow Hofmann student Dora Tamler.
1936–1937 Serves as monitor in Hofmann’s classes and teaches class in collage.
1939 Exhibits in American Art Today at the New York World’s Fair, where he is one of only five non-objective artists represented.
Named by Stuart Davis as alternate for World’s Fair Committee of Selection. Visits Mexico and studies murals.
1940 Visits Cuba for four months. Work reflects Cuban dance and cafe life.
1941 Has one-person exhibition in the Lyceum Gallery, Havana, Cuba.
1941–1943 Works in factories and as draftsman. Receives Ed. D. from Columbia
University.
1943–1946 Serves in the U.S. Navy.
1946–1948 Teaches at the University of Wyoming at Laramie.
1947 Exhibits in Abstract and Surrealist Art at Art Institute of Chicago, first large-scale exhibition of contemporary American modem art.
1948–1960 Serves as Director of Evening Art Program at Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, where he brings in Philip Guston, Franz Kline, Reuben Nakian and others to teach classes. Friendship with Kline.
1950 One person exhibition at the Charles Egan Gallery, New York, a gallery featuring emerging Abstract Expressionist artists such as Philip Guston, Franz Kline and Robert de Niro Sr.
1951 Participates in a group exhibition Abstract Art in America at Museum of Modern Art, New York.
1952 One-person exhibition at the Charles Egan Gallery, New York.
1953 One-person exhibitions at the Charles Egan Gallery, New York and Brown Gallery, Boston. Participates in the Carnegie International group exhibition in Pittsburgh and in the Whitney Museum Exhibition (later known as the Whitney Biennial) in New York.
1954 Has one person exhibition at the Charles Egan Gallery, New York.
[mid 1950s] McNeil’s painting style changes: work remains abstract but uses larger canvases, looser forms and a complex palette.
Work exhibited at HCE Gallery Provincetown, MA, where McNeil spends summers 1948–63.
1956 Has one person exhibition at the De Young Museum, San Francisco; teaches at University of California at Berkeley 1956–67.
1957 Has one person exhibition at the Poindexter Gallery, New York. Represented again in Whitney Museum Exhibition.
1958 Joins life-drawing group with Mercedes Matter, Charles Cajori, Sidney Geist and others (through 1970s); group forms genesis of the New York Studio School.
1959 Has one person exhibition at the Poindexter Gallery, New York.
[1960s–70s] McNeil introduces figural elements to his continuing expressionist style; teaches Art History in undergraduate Pratt Institute
Program and painting in MA program.
1960 Has one person exhibition at Howard Wise Gallery.
1961 Has one person exhibition at Nova Gallery, Boston; participates in Abstract Expressionists and Imagists, group exhibition at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia; again participates in group exhibition at Whitney Museum.
1962 Has one person exhibition at Howard Wise Gallery, New York. Participates in group exhibition at Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia.
1963 Receives Ford Foundation Purchase Award. Participates in Directions: Painting USA, group exhibition at the San Francisco Museum, San Francisco.
1964 One-person exhibition at Howard Wise Gallery, New York. Begins to spend part of every summer teaching and painting in France (to 1970).
1965 Again participates in Whitney Museum Exhibition.
1966 Has survey exhibition at University of Texas at Austin; has one person exhibition at Great Jones Gallery, New York; participates in Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts exhibition. Receives National Council on the Arts Award.
Begins teaching at New York Studio School (to 1980).
1968 Has one person exhibition at Howard Wise Gallery: first exhibition of McNeil’s paintings of nudes in the Dancer and Bather series.
1969 Has one person exhibition at the Des Moines Art Center, Des Moines, Iowa; participates in New American Painting:
The First Generation at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Awarded Guggenheim grant.
1971 Works as Artist in Residence at Tamarind Institute print workshop in Albuquerque, New Mexico, during four invitational trips (1971,1975, 1976, 1984). Imagery of New Mexican landscape and Native American culture evident in many paintings and lithographs
1973 Has one person exhibition at Pratt Manhattan Center, New York.
1975 Has one person exhibition at the Landmark Gallery, New York.
1976 Participates in Advocates of Abstraction: The American Abstract Artists 1936-1943 at downtown Whitney Museum, New York.
1977 Has one person exhibition at the Berman Gallery, New York. Participates in American Abstract Artists group exhibition, University of
New Mexico Art Museum, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Figurative works now often represent identifiable dramatic situations.
1979 Has one person exhibition at the Dintenfass Gallery, New York.
1981 Has one person exhibition at the Gruenebaum Gallery, New York; begins Disco paintings.
1982 Receives award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Has one person exhibition at University of Connecticut at Storrs;
has one person survey exhibition George McNeil: the Past Twenty years at the Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
1983 Has one person exhibition at the Gruenebaum Gallery, New York. Participates in The Painterly Figure, group exhibition at the Parrish Art Museum, South Hampton, New York.
1984 Has survey exhibition covering work 1954–84 at Artist’s Choice Museum, New York.
1985 Has one person exhibitions at SUNY at Binghamton New York; Kasmin Knoedler Gallery, London, UK; and Gruenebaum Gallery, New York. Receives honorary Doctor of Fine Arts from Pratt Institute.
1986 Has one person exhibition at the University of Bridgeport, Connecticut. Participates in American Masters: Works on Paper, group exhibition at the Corcoran Gallery, Washington, DC.
1987 Has one person exhibition at the Gruenebaum Gallery. Participates in group exhibitions Working in Brooklyn, Brooklyn Museum of Art; The Interior Self, Montclair Art Museum, Montclair, New Jersey; Elders of the Tribe, Bernice Steinbaum Gallery, New York.
1988 Receives honorary Doctor of Fine Arts, Maryland Institute College of Art. Begins graffiti and topographical paintings celebrating New York and its street life.
1989 Has one person exhibition at Knoedler Gallery, New York. Residency at University of Hartford; has one person exhibition at the Joceloff Gallery, University of Hartford. Elected to membership of the American Institute of Arts and Letters.
1990 Teaches Invitational Master Class at the Fine Arts Work Center, Provincetown, MA. Has survey of lithographs George McNeil: Three Decades of Prints at Montclair Art Museum, Montclair, New Jersey. Wife Dora McNeil dies.
1991 Has one person exhibition at Hirschl and Adler Modem Gallery, New York.
1990s Paintings become overtly psychological and fetishistic. Last lithographs 1991. Paints and revises work through 1994.
1992 Has one person exhibition, Manny Silverman Gallery, Los Angeles.
1993 Has one person exhibition at the New York Studio School, New York; has one person exhibition at Rena Bransten Gallery, San Francisco.
1994 Has one person exhibition at ACA Galleries, New York.
1995 Dies January 11.
Education:
Pratt Institute
Art Students League
Hans Hofmann School of Fine Arts
Columbia University

Selected Teaching Positions:
1937 Hans Hofmann School of Art
1946-1948 University of Wyoming at Laramie
1948-1981 Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, New York
1957-1957 University of California at Berkeley
1966-1981 New York Studio School of Painting, Drawing and Sculpture, New York

Selected Fellowships and Awards:
1963 Ford Foundation Purchase Award
1967 National Council on the Arts Awards
1969 Guggenheim Fellow
1971 Tamarind Institute, Artist-in-Residence. Also 1975, 1976, 1984.
1982 American Academy of Arts and Letters. Elected member 1989.
1985 Avery Chairperson, Edith C. Blum Art Institute, The Bard College Center
1985 Honorary Doctor of Fine Art, Pratt Institute
1988 Honorary Doctor of Fine Art, Maryland Institute College of Art
Selected Solo Exhibitions
1941 Lyceum Gallery, Havana, Cuba.
1950 Charles Egan Gallery, New York.
1952 Charles Egan Gallery, New York.
Hendler Galleries, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
1953 Charles Egan Gallery, New York. Brown Gallery, Boston, Massachusetts.
1954 Charles Egan Gallery, New York.
1956 De Young Museum, San Francisco, California.
1957 Poindexter Gallery, New York.
1959 Poindexter Gallery, New York.
1960 Howard Wise Gallery, New York.
1962 Howard Wise Gallery, New York.
1964 Howard Wise Gallery, New York.
1966 University of Texas at Austin
Great Jones Gallery, New York.
1967 Howard Wise Gallery, New York.
1969 Des Moines Art Center, Des Moines, Iowa.
1973 Pratt-Manhattan Center, New York.
1975 Landmark Gallery, New York.
1977 Berman Gallery, New York.
1979 Dintenfass Gallery, New York.
1981 Gruenebaum Gallery, New York.
1982 George McNeil: Paintings and Prints, Jorgensen Gallery, University of Connecticut at Storrs, March 22–April 16, 1982.
George McNeil: The Past Twenty years, Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, December 6–31, 1982. Catalogue essay by Carter Ratcliff.
1983 Gruenebaum Gallery, New York.
1984 George McNeil: Expressionism 1954–1984, September 22–November 10, Artists’ Choice Museum, New York.
1985 Kasmin Knoedler Gallery, London, UK.
Gruenebaum Gallery, New York.
State University of New York at Binghamton.
George McNeil Abstractscapes, Robeson Center Gallery, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey.
1986 Carlson Art Gallery, University of Bridgeport, Connecticut.
1987 Gruenebaum Gallery, New York.
1989 Joceloff Gallery, University of Hartford, Connecticut.
Knoedler Gallery, New York
1991 Hirschl & Adler Modem, New York.
George McNeil: Three Decades of Prints, Montclair Art Museum, Montclair, New Jersey.
1992 Manny Silverman Gallery, Los Angeles, California.
1993 New York Studio School, New York. Catalogue essay by Donald Kuspit.
Rena Bransten Gallery, San Francisco.
1994 ACA Galleries, New York.
1996 Nardin Galleries, Somers, New York.
1998 ACA Galleries, New Yark.
1999 George McNeil: the Late Paintings 1980–1995, The Hyde Collection Art Museum, Glens Falls, New York May 23–August 22; North Dakota Museum of Art, Grand Forks, North Dakota, September 20–November 1. Catalogue essays by Eleanor Heartney and Johathan Sandofer.
2002 George McNeil: Bathers, Dancers and Abstracts, ACA Galleries, New York, April 13–May 11, 2002; Provincetown Art Association and Museum, June 14–July 21. Catalogue essays by Peter Selz, Lillian Orlowsky,Paul Resika and Helen McNeil. George McNeil Abstractscapes, ACME Fine Art, Boston, Massachusetts, May 6–June 11, 2002.
2003 Luise Ross Gallery, New York March 6–May 3, 2003.
2005 Salander O’Reilly Galleries, New York.
2006 George McNeil: At Midcentury ACME Fine Art, Boston, Massachusetts, January 12–February 18, 2006.
2008 George McNeil: Paintings from the 1950s & 1960s, ACME Fine Art, Boston, Massachusetts, October 17 – November 15, 2008.
2010 George McNeil: The Women, 1938-1972, ACME Fine Art, Boston, Massachusetts, January 15- March 6, 2010.
Selected Group Exhibitions:
1939 American Art Today, New York World’s Fair.
1947 Abstract and Surrealist American Art, The Art Institute of Chicago. November 6, 1947–January 11, 1948.
1950 Post-Abstract Painting 1950: France-America, Provincetown Art Association, Provincetown, Massachusetts, August 6–September 4, 1950.
1951 Abstract Painting and Sculpture in America, Museum of Modern Art, New York.
9th Street Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture, New York May 21–June 10, 1951.
1953 Whitney Museum Exhibitions, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.
Carnegie International, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Stable Gallery, New York.
1954 Third Annual Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture, Stable Gallery, New York, January 26–February 20, 1954.
1955 Fourth Annual Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture, Stable Gallery, New York, April 26–May 21, 1955.
Carnegie International, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Drawings, Watercolors and Small Oils, Poindexter Gallery, December 19, 1955–January 7, 1956.
1956 American Abstract Artists, Riverside Museum, New York, April 8-May 20, 1956.
1957 Whitney Museum Exhibitions, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.
1958 Carnegie International, Pittsburgh Pennsylvania.
1959 Work of Twenty-Five years by Five Contemporary Painters, Camino Gallery, New York.
Painting and Sculpture Acquisitions, Museum of Modern Art, New York.
George McNeil and Michael Loew, Rutgers University Art Museum, New Brunswick, New Jersey.
1960 Contemporary American Painting, Columbus Gallery of Fine Arts, Columbus, Ohio, January 14–February 18, 1960.
1961 Whitney Museum Exhibitions, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.
Contemporary Paintings Selected from 1960-61 New York Gallery Exhibitions, Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut.
Some Contemporary American Artists, Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, Ohio.
American Abstract Artists and Imagists, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York.
66th Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting, circulated by USIA in Latin America, 1961–62.
Joint exhibition with Stephen Pace, Walker Art Gallery, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
1962 Continuity and Change, Wadsworth Athenaeum, Hartford, Connecticut.
66th American Exhibition, Paris, France, circulated by the Art Institute of Chicago.
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts Exhibition, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
1963 Directions: Paintings USA, San Francisco Museum, California.
Art in Embassies, circulated by Museum of Modern Art, New York City.
1964 Recent American Paintings, University of Texas Art Museum, Austin, Texas.
1965 Annual Exhibition, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York City.
1966 Annual Exhibition, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia
Art on Paper, Weatherspoon Gallery, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Nov 6–Dec 16, 1966.
1967 The New York Painter: A Century of Painting: Morris-Hofmann, Marlborough Gallery, New York.
1968 Painting as Painting, The Art Museum of the University of Texas at Austin, February 18–April 1, 1968.
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.
1969 The New American Painting: the First Generation, Museum of Modern Art, New York.
1972 Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn, New York.
1977 American Abstract Artists, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico.
1983 The Painterly Figure, Parrish Art Museum, South Hampton, New York.
1984 Emotional Impact: New York School Figurative Expressionism, Art Museum Association of America, San Francisco, curator April Kingsley: traveled 1984–6 Anchorage Historical and Fine Arts Museum, Anchorage Alaska; Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, University Art Gallery, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida; Oklahoma Museum of Art, Oklahoma City Oklahoma; Beaumont Art Center, Beaumont, Texas; Laguna Gloria Art Museum, Austin, Texas.
1985 Recent Acquisitions, Museum of Modern Art, New York City.
Exhibition of Avery Professors, Edith C. Blum Art Institute, Bard College Center, Annandale on Hudson, New York.
Visiting Artists, Kansas City Art Institute, Kansas City, Missouri.
Survival of the Fittest, Ingber Gallery, New York City.
1986 38th Annual Purchase Exhibition, Hassam and Speicher Fund, American Academy of Arts and Letters, New York City.
American Masters: Works on Paper, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.
Hans Hofmann and his Legacy, Level Meyerson Galleries, New York City.
Obscure Guerilla Chieftains of the Hemisphere, Area X Gallery, New York City.
Elders of the Tribe, Bernice Steinbaum Gallery, New York, December 2, 1986–January 3, 1987; between January 1987–June 1988 exhibition travels to ten other museum venues.
1987 Working in Brooklyn Painting, Brooklyn Museum, New York, June–September 7, 1987.
1988 Enduring Creativity, Whitney Museum of American Art, Fairfield County, Stanford, Connecticut, April I–June 15, 1988.
The Figurative Fifties, travelling exhibition, Newport Harbor Art Museum, Newport Beach, California.
1989 Face Off, Edward Thorpe Gallery, New York.
1990 The Provocative Years 1935–45, Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
1991 Smith Collects Contemporary, Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, Massachusetts.
1992 Big Paintings, Tucson Museum of Art, Tucson, Arizona.
1994 Paths of Abstraction: Painting in New York 1944-81, Bertha and Karl Leubsdorf Gallery, Hunter College, New York.
1996 Abstract Expressionism in the United States, Centro Cultural Arte Contemporaneo, Mexico, D.F. curated and with catalogue essay by
Irving Sandler.
1999 Joint exhibition with Leon Golub, Edward Hopper House, Nyack, New York. July, 1999.
2000 Forum Forty-Nine Revisited, exhibition Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
2001 The Stamp of Impulse: Abstract Expressionist Prints, Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, Massachusetts, April 22–June 17, 2001.
2002–2003 Meditations on the Human Spirit, traveling exhibition organized by Meridian International Center, Washington, D.C.
Provincetown Painters, ACME Fine Art, Boston, Massachusetts, 2002.
2003 Recent Acquisitions, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts.
The New York School, ACME Fine Art, Boston, Massachusetts.
2005 Provincetown Painters, ACME Fine Art, Boston, Massachusetts.
Artwork From the Collection of William Freed & Lillian Orlowsky ACME Fine Art, Boston, Massachusetts.
2006 Making it New: George McNeil & His Students, Montserrat College of Art, Beverly, Massachusetts, August 28 – October 28, 2006.
2007 Figuratively Speaking, ACME Fine Art, Boston, Massachusetts, March 23 – April 28, 2007.
2008 The Art of Gesture, David Findlay Jr. Fine Art, New York, New York, April 8-29, 2008.
Summer Salon, ACME Fine Art, Boston, Massachusetts, June 27 – August 16, 2008.
Works on Paper, ACME Fine Art, Boston, Massachusetts, November 21 – December 23, 2008.
2009 Gallery Selections, Hollis Taggart Galleries, New York, New York, January 15 – March 7, 2009.
Days Lumberyard Studios, Provincetown, 1915-1972, ACME Fine Art, Boston, Massachusetts, May 15 – August 22, 2009.
Hans Hofmann & George McNeil, Morrison Gallery, Kent Connecticut, December 12, 2009 – January 31, 2010.
2010 American Modernists in Wyoming: George McNeil, Ilya Bolotowsky, and Leon Kelly, University of Wyoming Art Museum, January 30 – August 7, 2010.
Days Lumberyard Studios, 1914-1972, Fine Arts Work Center, Provincetown, Massachusetts, July 10 – August 3, 2010
Selected Public Collections:
Alcoa Collection of Modern Art, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts
Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn, New York.
Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio.
Ciba-Geigy Corporation, Arosley, New York.
Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
DuPont Gallery, Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Virginia.
Exxon Corporation, New York City.
Farnsworth Art Museum, Rockport, Maine.
Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, England.
Fort Lauderdale Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
Gray Art Gallery, New York University, New York.
Huntington Art Gallery, James Michener Collection, University of Texas, Austin, Texas.
Hyde Collection, Glens Falls, New York.
Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Ithaca, New York
Kresge Art Museum, East Lansing, Michigan.
Lannan Foundation, Los Angeles, California (dispersed).
Mead Art Museum, Amherst College, Amherst, Massachusetts.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
University of Michigan Art Museum, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, California.
Museum of Modern Art, New York
Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.
Neuberger Museum, State University of New York at Purchase, New York.
Newark Museum, Newark, New Jersey.
North Dakota Museum of Art, Grand Forks, North Dakota.
Northern Michigan University Art Museum, Marquette, Michigan.
Oklahoma City Art Museum, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
Palm Springs Desert Museum, Palm Springs, California.
Philip Morris Corporation, New York.
Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts.
Smith College Museum of Art, Northhampton, Massachusetts.
Smithsonian Institute Print Collection, Washington, DC.
Springfield Art Museum, Springfield, Missouri.
University of Michigan Art Museum, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
University of New Mexico Art Museum, Albuquerque, New Mexico.
Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Weatherspoon Gallery, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, North Carolina.
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.
Weisman Museum of Art, Pepperdine University, Malibu, California.
Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, Massachusetts.
Zimmerli Art Museum, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.

 

 

Artist Biography: Byron Browne

Byron Browne

(1907-1961)

Education
National Academy of Design
Also with Zorach, Aiken, and Karfunkle

Member
American Abstract Artists, (charter member 1935)
Audubon Artists
American Artists Congress
Allied American Artists

Selected Exhibitions
National Academy of Design, 1928 (prize), 1929
Art Institute of Chicago, 1928, 1935, 1946
Corcoran Gallery of Art, 1928, 1930, 1947, 1953, 1957
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, 1930-31, 1936, 1946-47,1951, 1954
Whitney Museum of American Art, 1935, 1937, 1939, 1946
Museum of Modern Art, 1939
Worlds Fair, New York, 1939
Audubon Artists, 1945
Carnegie Institute, 1946
Kootz Gallery, 1946 (solo)
University of Illinios, 1951 (solo)
Salons of America
Society of Independent Artists
Selected Collections:
Brooklyn Museum
Whitney Museum of American Art
Museum of Fine Arts Boston
Art Students League
Smithsonian Institution
Everson Museum
High Museum
Fogg Art Museum
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art
Munson Williams Proctor Institute
Virginia Museum of Fine Art
Walker Art Center
Newark Museum
Butler Art Institute
University of Georgia
Hirshhorn Museum
Dallas Museum of Fine Art
Tel-Aviv Museum
Roswell Museum
University of Minnesota
Cornell University
Brown University
Northeastern University
New School for Social Research
University of Arizona
Chrysler Museum
Williams College

 

 

 

 

Artist Biography: William Freed

WILLIAM FREED
(1902-1981)

Freed-Orlowsky

EDUCATION:

Educational Alliance Art School, with Auerbach-Levy
Art Students League
Hans Hofmann School of Fine Art, in New York and Provincetown

AWARDS:

1957
1st Prize, Cape Cod Art Association, Hyannis, MA, Jurors Karl Knaths, Myron Stout and Mary Cecil Allen.

1960
Longview Foundation Purchase Award.

1967
Chapelbrook Foundation Grant.

1976
Goddard College Annual Cash Award, Best in Show.

1984
Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Foundation Grant.

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS:

1928
Society of Independent Artists, New York.

1936
Municipal Art Week, New York.

1937
A C A Gallery, New York, through 1967.
Federal Art Project Gallery, New York, through 1940.

1941
39th Annual Philadelphia Water-color and Print Exhibition, Philadelphia, PA.

1946
Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, MA, through 1980.

1949
Gallery 49, Provincetown, MA.

1952
Riverside Museum, Riverside, CA.
Kaufman Gallery, New York.
92nd Street Y, New York.

1953
H C E Gallery, Provincetown, MA, through 1967.

1954
Abbo Ostrowsky Collection, Jewish Museum.

1955
James Gallery, New York, through 1962.

1956
Sun Gallery, Provincetown, MA, 1956
Museum of Modern Art Lending Library, through 1963.

1957
H C E Gallery, Provincetown, MA, through 1960.

1958
Gallery 256, Provincetown, MA.
Burluik Gallery, New York.
Worcester Museum, MA.
Boston Arts Festival, Boston, MA, also 1959.

1959
Whitney Museum of America Arts, New York.
Audubon Society, New York.
DeCordova and Dana Museum and Park, Lincoln, MA.

1960
Esther Stuttman Gallery, Provincetown, MA (solo).
New Arts Gallery, Atlanta, GA (solo).
New York University Art Collection exhibit, New York.
Kresge Art Gallery, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI.

1962
Esther Stuttman Gallery, New York (solo).
Corcoran Gallery, Washington, D.C.

1963
Hofmann and His Students, Museum of Modern Art, New York (traveling exhibition).

1964
Museum of Modern Art Lending Library.

1965
Esther Stuttman Gallery, New York, NY (solo).
Golden Anniversary, Provincetown Art Association and Museum, MA.

1967
Artisan Gallery, Brunswick, ME (solo).

1970
Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA.
First Major New England Show of the 70’s, Boston Arts Center, MA.

1971
Free Abstract Form of the 50’s, Whitney Museum of American Art, NY.
Provincetown 3rd Invitational Show, Provincetown, MA
Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA.

1976
Tirca Karlis Gallery, Provincetown, MA, through 1980.

1977
WPA, Then and Now, Parsons Shool of Design, New York.

1978
Provincetown Painters, 1890’s-1970’s, Everson Museum, Syracuse, NY.
10th Street in 1977, Landmark Gallery.
CO-OPS of 10th St., Ward-Nasse Gallery.

1979
Goddard College, Plainfield, VT (solo).

1980
Lenore Ross Gallery, Provincetown, MA (solo).
Hans Hofmann as a Teacher; drawn from the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the PAAM.

1981
In Retrospect, Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, MA.
Adelphi University, Garden City, New York.

1999
Forum 49 Revisited, Provincetown Art Association and Museum, MA.

2001
Cape Museum of Fine Arts, Dennis, MA.

2002
ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA.

2003
ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA.
Beauregard Gallery, Rumson, NJ.
Cherrystone Gallery, Wellfleet, MA.
Hans Hofmann and His Students, Provincetown Art Association and Museum, MA.
Artists from the Sun Gallery, Provincetown Art Association and Museum, MA.

2004
ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA.

SELECTED COLLECTIONS:

Whitney Museum of American Art
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Smithsonian Institution
Chrysler Museum
Jewish Museum
Provincetown Art Association and Museum
New York University Art Collection
University of Texas
Cape Cod Museum of Art
Magnes Museum, Berkeley, California.
Rose Museum, Brandeis University

Lillian Orlowsky

Lillian Orlowsky
(1914- 2004)

Freed-Orlowsky

 

Education
Educational Alliance Art School, New York, 1932–1933
National Academy of Design, New York, 1933–1934
American Artist School (Raphael and Moses Soyer, Anton Refrigier),
New York, 1935–1936
Hans Hofmann School of Fine Art, New York and Provincetown, MA, 1937–1947

Selected Exhibitions
New York World’s Fair, New York, 1939
Milch Gallery, New York
ACA Gallery, New York, 1940–1942
Educational Alliance Alumni, Educational Alliance, New York,1945, 1946
Provincetown Art Association and Museum (PAAM), Provincetown, MA, 1950–1991
HCE Gallery, Provincetown, MA, 1951–1955
Burliuk Gallery, New York,1952
Gallery Artists, James Gallery, New York,1952–1962
Fine Arts Gallery, Atlanta, GA, 1953
James Gallery, New York,1955
James Gallery, New York,1959
Stuttman Gallery, Provincetown, MA; New York, NY; Washington, DC, 1956–1960
James Gallery, New York,1960
James Gallery, New York,1962
Gallery Artists, Tirca Karlis Gallery, Provincetown, MA, 1962–1976
“Works Progress Administration (WPA), Then and Now.” Parsons School of Design, New York, 1977
“The Co-ops of the Fifties.” Parsons School of Design, New York, 1977“Days Lumberyard Studios: Provincetown 1914–1971.”
PAAM, Provincetown, MA, 1978
“Hans Hofmann and His Students.” Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1979
PAAM, Provincetown, MA, 1980
Goddard College, Plainfield, VT
Adelphi College, NY, 1980
Lenore Ross Gallery, Provincetown, MA
Hofstra College, Long Island, NY, 1981
Ingber Gallery, New York, NY
“WPA Artists.” Hofstra College, Long Island, NY, 1983
“WPA Artists: Fiftieth Anniversary.” City Gallery of New York,
New York, 1984
Provincetown Artists Gallery, Provincetown, MA
Dennis DeBerry Gallery, Provincetown, MA, 1985
“The Gathering of the Avante-Garde: The Lower East Side 1950–1970.” Kenkelebra House, New York, NY, 1985
Selected Works. National Council on Aging, Washington, DC
“The Assembled Image: An Exhibition of Collage and Construction.” (Curators: Jim Forsberg and Paul Bowen), PAAM, Provincetown, MA, 1989
“The Artist’s Eye.” (Curator: Peter Hutchinson), PAAM, Provincetown, MA
“WPA Artists.” New Brunswick College, NJ
“The Provocative Years, 1935–1945: Hans Hofmann and His Students in Provincetown.” PAAM, Provincetown, MA,1990
“The Artist’s Eye.” (Curator: Jim Lechay), PAAM, Provincetown, MA, 1991
Cape Museum of Fine Arts, Dennis, MA, 1992
“USA on Paper.” City Gallery, Copenhagen, Denmark, 1993
Gallery Artists, Gallery Zhouf, Wellfleet, MA
Vernissage Le Samedi, Nimes, Uzes, France
Gallery K + B, Prague, Czech Republic
Cherrystone Gallery, Wellfleet, MA
Selected Works. Office de la Culture D’Uzes, Nimes, France, 1994
Gallery A, Most, Czech Republic
“Provincetown Abstract Painting 1915–1950; From the Collection of Penny and Elton Yasuna.” PAAM, Provincetown, MA
“New York: Provincetown – A ‘50s Connection.” PAAM, Provincetown, MA
PAAM, Provincetown, MA, 1995
Cherrystone Gallery, Wellfleet, MA
Cortland Jessup Gallery, Provincetown, MA
“Provincetown Then and Now.” St. Botolph Club, Boston, MA, 1998
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA (solo exhibition)
“The Art Colony (First Century).” PAAM, Provincetown, MA
National Arts Club, New York City, NY, 2000
School House Gallery, Provincetown, MA (solo exhibition)
Cherrystone Gallery, Wellfleet, MA, 2001
Cherrystone Gallery, Wellfleet, MA (solo exhibition)
“Lillian Orlowsky: Early Masterworks” ACME Fine Art, Boston (solo) 2002
“A Lifetime of Art” Beauregard Fine Art, Rumson, NJ (solo)
“Provincetown Women Artists” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
“Provincetown Painters” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
“Summer Salon” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
“A Community of Artists: The Collection of the Provincetown Art Association and Museum” (traveling exhibition) Philharmonic Center for the Arts, Naples, FL, 2002-2005
Gustavus Adolphus College, St Peter, MN
Price Tower Arts Center, Inc. Bartlesville, OK
Palmer Museum of Art, University Park, PA
St. John’s Museum of Art, Wilmington, NC
Springfield Museum of Art, Springfield, OH
Muskegon Museum of Art, Muskegon, MI
Mitchell Art Gallery, Annapolis, MD
2003 “Lillian Orlowsky” Beauregard Fine Art, Rumson, NJ (solo)
“The New York School” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
“Lillian Orlowsky: The Fifties” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA (solo)
“Provincetown Painters” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
“Summer Salon” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
“From the Collection: Hans Hofmann Students” Cape Cod Museum of Art, Dennis, MA, 2004
“Summer Salon” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
“Dialogue with Hofmann: 1930s, ‘40s, & ‘50s” Cherrystone Gallery, Wellfleet, MA (solo)
“A Community of Artists: The Collection of the Provincetown Art Association and Museum” Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, MA, 2005
“From the Collection: Provincetown Painters” Cape Cod Museum of Art, Dennis, MA
“Artwork from the Collection of William Freed & Lillian Orlowsky” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
“Lillian Orlowsky: In Retropect” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA (solo)
“Teachers & Students” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
“Provincetown Painters” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
“Summer Salon” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
Cherrystone Gallery, Wellfleet, MA
“Tell Me What You See” (Elementary School Students selections from the P.A.A.M. permanent collection) Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, MA, 2006
“Provincetown Painters” Beauregard Fine Art, Rumson NJ
“Summer Salon” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
“Drawings from Hans Hofmann’s Figure Drawing Class (1937-1955)”
ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA, 2007
“Summer Salon” ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA

BIFAS 086

Public Collections
Archives of the Smithsonian Institute, Washington, DC
Baltimore Museum, Baltimore, MD
Cape Cod Museum of Art, Dennis, MA
Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA
Jerusalem Museum, Jerusalem, Israel
Judah L. Magney Museum, Jewish Museum of the West, Berkeley, CA
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA
Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, MA
Rose Museum, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA

The artist’s statement

I was fortunate to have taken part in one of the most important periods in art in the twentieth century. The 1930s through the 1950s saw a cultural upheaval where diverse concepts in painting went from one extreme to another: from realism to abstraction. In the forefront were the WPA Art Project, and in some measure, the Provincetown Art Association. They promoted cultural awareness of the different pictorial concepts, which were the beginning of the changing scene of plastic expression.

The WPA was a great innovative idea that gave me and other artists the opportunity to concentrate on our work. It was unique in the history of American art and responsible for many murals and easel paintings, which became government property. The artists received a weekly salary plus artist’s materials. We would gather to pick up our checks at 110 King Street in Manhattan. Since there was always a long wait, we had time to talk about the current art scene. It was there that I learned of Hofmann.

The Hofmann School and the influx of European artists opened my sensibility to new horizons. These associations changed my visual perception. I no longer saw painting as an imitation of nature, but instead as an attempt to interpret nature on the picture plane.

I came to Provincetown to study with Hofmann. I found a most desirable north light studio at the Days Lumberyard, now the Fine Arts Work Center. Primitive as it was, it was memorable because the camaraderie and social and cultural exchange among the artists there. At the time, the group of artists consisted of Hans Hofmann, George McNeil, Fritz Bultman, William Freed, Perle Fine, Peter Busa, and Bruce McKain. In the early 50s, they were joined by Jan Muller, Myron Stout, Myrna Harrison, Earl Pierce, and James Gahagan. The catwalk became our forum for exchange of ideas of pictorial reality and chit-chat. In the late 50s, my husband, William Freed and I moved from Days Lumber Yard and built our studios on Brewster Street. Provincetown and the Provincetown Art Association provided an umbrella for artists of all schools of thought. The town and PAAM continue to encourage and accept controversial aesthetic ideas.

The future for me means new challenges, new experiences, and new creative possibilities. George McNeil had it right: “The first eighty years are the hardest, so now I hope for the best: freedom leading to more freedom.”

BIOGRAPHY

Lillian Orlowsky was born and raised in New York City. Appropriately, one of her first exhibitions was at the New York World’s Fair in 1939. In addition to painting, she acted as a textile designer, a gallery director, a curator and a teacher. Her paintings are part of the permanent collections at several major museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art; the Jerusalem Museum in Israel; the Archives of the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, DC; and the Provincetown Art Association and Museum. Her work is exhibited as near as Manhattan, Provincetown and Boston and as far away as Copenhagen, Prague and Nimes, France.