About acmemichael

Posts by acmemichael:

ACME FINE ART Will Be Open This Weekend for South End Open Studios

south-end-oepn-studiosPlease join us this weekend for South End Open Studios, Saturday & Sunday September 21 & 22 11am – 6 pmACME Fine Art will be open along with over 120 artists studios, indie designers and crafts people, who will be selling their wares outdoors at the Sowa Open Market. This is SoWa’s biggest weekend of the season!!

ACME Fine Art’s exhibitions: CHARLES LITTLER: 1950s and 1960s and Big Paintings, Small Group will be on view through Saturday, 19 October 2013. The entire exhibition is online at  www.acmefineart.com.

 

Picture 065New gallery hours are Wednesday through Saturday, 11:00 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. and by appointment. For further information about the exhibition, artist, or the gallery please call 617.585.9551 or contact us at info@acmefineart.com.

CHARLES LITTLER: 1950s and 1960s

Littler.Untitled AbstractACME Fine Art’s first exhibition and opening reception of the 2013 Fall Season will also mark the Grand Opening of the gallery’s new location at 1 Thayer Street in Boston’s SoWa Arts District. ACME’s new street level gallery space is located at the corner of Harrison Avenue and Thayer Streets in the South End. The Opening Reception will coincide with SoWa’s regular First Friday events on Friday, 6 September 2013 from 5:00 to 9:00 p.m.

True to the gallery’s ongoing commitment to showcase important American artists of the 20th century, the premiere exhibition in ACME Fine Art’s new gallery space will be a select group of paintings and drawings made in the 1950s and 1960s by noted Abstract Expressionist artist Charles Littler. Littler was a New York School practitioner who emerged from his studies with Hans Hofmann in New York and Provincetown in the early 1950s with a fully articulate and masterfully elegant mode of visual expression that won the immediate respect of his colleagues. In 1952, he, along with Jim Gahagan, founded the James Gallery on 10th Street in Manhattan. The James Gallery is noteworthy for being among the first of a number of important artists’ cooperative galleries that championed Abstract Expressionism in the early 1950s. During this period, Littler’s artwork was featured in solo exhibitions at the James Gallery and the Glidden Gallery in New York, and was also included in a number of group exhibitions at venues such as the New York Center Gallery and at the prestigious149th Annual Exhibition of the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts.

In 1957 Littler abandoned the New York art scene and moved to Tucson Arizona, where he taught at the University of Arizona for the next twenty-six years. During this period Littler’s artwork was included in numerous group exhibitions throughout the Southwest, and he was honored with solo exhibitions at the Tuscon Art Center, the Ohio University Art Gallery, and at the University of Arizona. Littler considered his most important artistic accomplishment, however, to be the founding of a communal residential artists’ environment in Oracle Arizona called Rancho Linda Vista. To quote him, “my view of Rancho Linda Vista is that it’s a work of art, initiated by me and executed collaboratively by many members, past, present, and future.” Today –now in it’s third generation- the community that Littler initiated is still thriving.

This will be ACME Fine Art’s second solo exhibition of artwork by Charles Littler. For this exhibition, Gallery Director David Cowan has selected a group of paintings and drawings that span, not only Littler’s transition from east to west, but also demonstrate the artist’s transition from pure Abstract Expressionism to the Figurative Expressionist idiom that seems to have come naturally in conjunction with his relocation from New York to Arizona. It is likely no coincidence that while Littler’s artwork was trending figural, the Figurative Expressionist movement associated with his artist colleagues Jan Muller, Lester Johnson, George McNeil, Robert Beauchamp and Bob Thompson was emerging in avant-garde circles in New York and in Provincetown.

ACME Fine Art’s exhibition: CHARLES LITTLER: 1950s and 1960s will be on view from Friday, 6 September through Saturday, 19 October 2013. New gallery hours are Wednesday through Saturday, 11:00 a.m. until 5:30 p.m. and by appointment. For further information about the exhibition, artist, or the gallery please call 617.585.9551 or contact us at info@acmefineart.com.

INTERIORS

Deck of Emma Bakke, 1953, oil on panel, 16 x 20

Mary Hackett – Deck of Emma Bakke, 1953, oil on panel, 16 x 20

13 April – 25 May, 2013

INTERIORS is the title of a six-artist group exhibition that will open at ACME Fine Art in Boston on Saturday, 13 April 2013. The exhibition will feature classic paintings by twentieth century modern artists who practiced in Provincetown as well as cutting edge contemporary artwork created specifically for this exhibition by artists who have been fellows at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown. The exhibition will be on view through 25 May, 2013 at the gallery and on-line at www.acmefineart.com.

The six artists included in this distinguished group are:

Maurice Freedman was very much a “mid-century modern” artist. Freedman’s brilliantly colorful paintings of interior scenes at once visually recall his study with Max Beckman during the first half of the twentieth century and at the same time illuminate his own personal outward-looking experiences of both Provincetown and his studio in New York. His work expressively captures both time and space.

Mary Hackett was a self-taught painter and longtime resident of Provincetown. Her scenes of everyday life contain numerous symbolic and memory-laden objects placed in an often naïvely constructed space that together create an autobiographical narrative that is so compelling that Hackett has developed a formidable cult following among those fortunate enough to know and collect her rare creations.

Sharli Powers Land was a fellow at the Fine Arts Work Center in 1969-‘70. Her boldly evocative paintings have an uncanny appeal with a dynamic composition and a palette that is downright explosive. Land’s interior views capture a sense of place while often making reference to a place in time through the incorporation of formal references to her contemporaries such as Mary Hackett and Myron Stout.

Samuel Messer was a fellow at the Fine Arts Work Center in 1981. Messer is currently Associate Dean of the Art program at Yale University. His interior portraits are wildly expressive paeans to his subject. They convey an all-encompassing vision of their sitter through the loosely rendered likeness that is central to the composition and through the complex interior environment created by Messer.

Meghan Gordon was a recent fellow at the Fine Arts Work Center. Gordon’s artwork relies heavily on art-historical research. She creates paintings/drawings, objects, film, and installations that create an alternative art history that actively engages and challenges the observer. The interior is consistently a crucial theme and component of Gordon’s artistry.

Paul Kelly is a contemporary artist living in Provincetown whose subject matter is most often Cape related. Kelly’s paintings have an elegantly edited quality both in palette and in composition. The resultant views appear both true to their location and completely abstract, simultaneously. Like Freedman, this artist is interested in the view through the opening; however, in Kelly’s interiors all but the essential has been eliminated.

Beyond the obvious links having to do with the outer Cape, the INTERIORS exhibition will explore common threads in the genre as evidenced in the works by these six important 20th and 21st century artists. Some of the common threads are: visual and formal interests in the relationships between inside and out vis-à-vis the notion of containment, the use of personal objects as symbols and the meanings associated with them, the manipulation of perspective to enhance a sense of space and volume, the introduction of historical references and the connections such references make with the observer, and how the introduction of the figure –portrait or self-portrait- animates the interior.

A special Exhibition Preview Event to benefit the Fine Arts Work Center will be hosted by the Galleries at 38 Newbury Street on Friday 12 May. Drinks and hors d’oeuvres, catered by MAX Ultimate Food, will be served between 6:00 and 8:00 p.m. In celebration of National Poetry Month, special guests at the event will also include Robert Pinsky, US Poet Laureate (1997-2000), and poet John Murillo, Fine Arts Work Center writing Fellow (2007-2008). Tickets for the preview can be purchased through the Fine Arts Work Center (www.fawc.org/tickets) or by phone at 508-487-9960 x 101. Please contact the gallery for further information.

MICHAEL LOEW: WORKS ON PAPER at ACME FINE ART

Loew_PTP2013 February – 2 March, 2013

A retrospective survey of watercolors and drawings by noted abstract expressionist artist Michael Loew will open on Saturday 9 February at ACME Fine Art in Boston. A reception from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. will mark the occasion. The exhibition will be on view through Saturday 2 March at the gallery and on-line at www.acmefineart.com.

This will be the third solo exhibition of Michael Loew’s popular abstractions; however, it will be the first that runs across periods in the artist’s body of work, and the first that focuses exclusively on works on paper. The exhibition will be composed of works created between the late 1930s and 1985, and it highlights drawings and watercolors that were made as studies for paintings or murals, as well as finished, stand alone artworks. All stand on their own merit as outstanding examples –not only of Michael Loew’s creative powers- but also, of the artistic spirit of modernism in the twentieth century.

Michael Loew was a master of weaving geometry with nature. He seemed to delight in exploring the limits of nature based abstraction. Throughout his career one can see a back and forth between the almost totally abstract, and the representational. Although it is impossible to say how and where Loew’s modern tendencies originated, it is fair to say that his experiences, his education, and his own interests led him in a distinctly avant-garde direction very early on. On the side of experience, one might point out his collaboration with DeKooning on a 1939 NYC World’s Fair mural that led to a life-long friendship that must have influenced Loew. Certainly, his post war training under one of the most important nature-based abstract expressionists, Hans Hofmann, also proved to have had significant influence. Then, there was his study abroad at the Atelier Leger. Although various influences may have come to bear on Michael Loew, his work is always in his own true voice, and that voice is consistently clear, concise, and elegantly expressive.

Michael Loew’s artistic talents were recognized as early as 1929 when he won the Sadie A. May Travelling Fellowship, and the honors continued with awards such as the National Endowment for the Arts Grant, the Judith Rothschild Grant, and the Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship. Today, Loew’s work is in the permanent collections of Art Museums such as the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the Carnegie Institute Museum of Art, and the Albright Knox Art Gallery.

A comprehensive exhibition catalogue including an essay by Susan C. Larsen is available through the gallery. Please contact ACME Fine Art for further information about Michael Loew, or this exhibition.

Lillian Orlowsky & William Freed: EMERGING at MID-CENTURY

ACME Freed Untitled Abstraction #217 November – 22 December 2012

An exhibition of paintings and works on paper titled: Lillian Orlowsky & William Freed: EMERGING at MID-CENTURY will open with a reception from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. on Saturday, 17 November 2012 at ACME Fine Art’s 38 Newbury Street gallery in Boston. The exhibition has been curated by the Provincetown Art Association and Museum’s Executive Director Christine McCarthy. With the intention of taking a fresh look at the body of work created by the two well-known New York and Provincetown based abstract expressionists, McCarthy focused on works in the artists’ estates that have not been previously exhibited. As a result, in addition to important oil paintings dating from as early as the couple studied with Hans Hofmann; the exhibition will also include a series of large freely executed tempera on paper still-life abstractions, as well as a fascinating group of modern fabric designs from the 1940s and 1950s by Orlowsky.

Lillian Orlowsky and William Freed met while both were Works Project Administration artists in New York in the late 1930s. Orlowsky is credited with introducing Freed to Hans Hofmann shortly after Hofmann established his School of Art in Manhattan, and the couple were among the first of Hofmann’s students to move to Provincetown during the summer months to participate in Hofmann’s School there as well.

Orlowsky and Freed developed lengthy and significant personal and professional relationships with Hofmann while building important careers in the avant-garde world of modern art in their own rights. In the mid-1950s, along with a group that included artists such as Jim Gahagan, Charles Littler, Robert Henry, Haynes Ownby and Myrna Harrison, they formed the nucleus of the James Gallery, an early artists’ cooperative gallery on 12th Street in Manhattan. Since that time, their artwork has been exhibited in numerous commercial galleries and in museum venues. Artwork by Lillian Orlowsky and also by William Freed is in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Cape Cod Museum of Art, and of the Provincetown Art Association and Museum to name a few.

The exhibition Lillian Orlowsky & William Freed: EMERGING at MID-CENTURY will be on view at ACME Fine Art from Saturday 17 November through Saturday 22 December 2012. Sales from the exhibition will benefit the Lillian Orlowsky and William Freed Foundation Grant program.

Myrna Harrison: PAINTINGS of the 1950s at ACME Fine Art, Boston

Harrison Chroma17 November – 22 December 2012

ACME Fine Art is pleased to announce that an exhibition of six rare early paintings by Myrna Harrison will open with a Reception from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. on Saturday, 17 November 2012. The artist will be on hand to discuss her work and meet the public.

The featured works have been selected by Gallery Director David Cowan and are among the most abstract in the artist’s formidable oeuvre. They were created immediately following Harrison’s period of study at the Hans Hofmann Schools in both New York and Provincetown. Several of the paintings were also created during the period when Harrison was studying independently with noted Abstract Expressionist artist and educator, Jack Tworkov, and while studying at NYU with Philip Guston.

This exhibition is designed to coincide with a concurrent exhibition at ACME Fine Art of artwork by Lillian Orlowsky and William Freed who were close friends of Harrison’s. Both exhibitions draw from the same mid-century post-Hofmann experiences of the artists. All three helped form an early cooperative art gallery in Manhattan in the 1950s called the James Gallery. Other artist/members of the James Gallery included Robert Henry, Haynes Ownby, and Charles Littler.

Myrna Harrison is an accomplished artist and educator in her own right. Her artwork has been exhibited widely since the early 1950s is such venues as the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the Washington University Art Museum, and the Cape Cod Museum of Art. Earlier this year she was honored with a retrospective exhibition of her work at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum where she has been a participating member for sixty years. Artwork by Ms. Harrison is in numerous private collections as well as the permanent collections of the Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University, the Phoenix Art Museum, the Provincetown Art Association and Museum and the Cape Cod Museum of Art.

In conjunction with the publication of a monograph about her that was published earlier this year Harrison wrote: Oceans and deserts fascinate me. They share spatial openness, an unending skyline, subtle changes in form and color as the sun moves across the sky, and a demand that we adapt to them. They will not adapt to us. Both have an intense, vibrant presence — which is not surprising: deserts began life as oceans millions of years ago. I want my work to express that vibrant intensity. The monograph is available through ACME Fine Art and through the Provincetown Art Association and Museum as well.

Myrna HARRISON: PAINTINGS of the 1950s will be on view at ACME Fine Art through Saturday, 22 December 2012. Please contact the gallery at info@acmefineart.com for further information about the artist and/or the artwork.

DIRECTOR’S CHOICE 2012

Picture 06215 September – 3 November 2012

ACME Fine Art’s opening exhibition of the Fall Season will be a group exhibition of important canvases by four of America’s top expressionist painters. The exhibition will open with a reception from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. on Saturday 15 September, and will be on view through Saturday 3 November 2012.

DIRECTOR’S CHOICE 2012 was organized and curated by Gallery Director David Cowan who selected works from the estate of first generation abstract expressionist Giorgio Cavallon, from the estates of groundbreaking figurative expressionists Lester Johnson and George McNeil, and from the “white series” group of paintings that were created by former Rhino Horn artist Jay Milder during the 1970s. All of the artwork is fresh and new to the gallery. Most of the pieces have not been exhibited since their gallery debuts during the second half of the twentieth century.

Thematically speaking, this exhibition presents powerful paintings by powerful painters. Without exception, the paintings that comprise this Director’s Choice show are bold –in most cases monumental- blockbusters that convey the artists’ passion for the medium and for his message. They are abstract, compelling, and evocative, and they veritably demand response from the viewer.

For more information about the exhibition or about Jay Milder, George McNeil, Lester Johnson and/or Giorgio Cavallon please contact the gallery. The entire exhibition will be viewable on-line at www.acmefineart.com. This exhibition will run concurrently with the solo exhibition: GEORGE LLOYD: INSIDE / OUT.

GEORGE LLOYD – INSIDE/OUT an Exhibition of Paintings and Drawings

ACME Lloyd Summer Construct 1981 oc 20 x 1615 September – 3 November 2012For ACME

Fine Art’s opening exhibition of the 2012 fall season, the gallery will present the fourth solo exhibition of paintings and drawings by George Lloyd. The exhibition will be on view from 15 September to 3 November 2012, and will open with a reception from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. on Saturday 15 September.

The exhibition will feature a group of works that span Lloyd’s four decade long career as an artist and will focus on the artist’s interest in the formal deconstruction and reinvention of interior space. Gallery Director David Cowan curated the exhibition that consists of five important oil paintings and one early drawing that were created in a variety of locations –mostly where Lloyd was teaching at the time: Berkeley, CA, Ithaca, NY, Middletown CT, Bangor and Portland ME. These works incorporate a variety of formal and technical devices to blur the sense of real space and draw the viewer into the painter’s world of complex spatial ambiguity.

Looking at the paintings as a group, they are a riot of color. However, it is the palette chosen by the artist that depicts each work to the location where it was conceived and created, and simultaneously reveals the artist’s maturing point of view about his own sense of place. The architectural elements that are visible in these scenes provide a visual framework that organizes the canvas. The mundane objects –often still life elements present in Lloyd’s kitchen or studio- link the artwork to a common experience and lock in a sense of reality to what are ultimately skillfully conceived works of fiction. These are sophisticated, intimate, and most of all, compelling works of art that come to life in the viewing experience.

For more information about George Lloyd, please contact ACME Fine Art.

SUMMER SALON 2012

Baker, Norman Mailer 1998Twentieth century American painting from New England’s summer art colonies will be the focus of ACME Fine Art’s summer-long exhibition. The salon style show will open on the 21 July and will run through 18 August 2012.

More than twenty artists and over thirty works will be included in the exhibition that will present a stylistic cross section of modern art in America. Coastal New England art colonies such as Monhegan Island and Cranberry Island in Maine, and Wellfleet and Provincetown in Massachusetts are the sources for much of the artwork that will comprise the exhibition, and the New England coastline will be the loosely interpreted theme. Artwork from the early twentieth century will include paintings by Charles Demuth, Charles Hawthorne, E. Ambrose Webster, Edwin Dickinson, Jack Tworkov, and Karl Knaths.  Fine examples by mid-century artists such as: Hans Hofmann, George McNeil, Giorgio Cavallon, Lester Johnson, Stephen Pace, Edward Corbett, Haynes Ownby, Michael Loew, Daniel Brustlein, Charles Littler, Seong Moy, Dorothy Eisner, John Grillo, James Gahagan, Tony Vevers, and James Lechay. The exhibition also features a fine selection of paintings by late twentieth century and contemporary artists: Alex Katz, Helen Frankenthaler, Myrna Harrison, Richard Baker, Robert Beauchamp, Mary Frank, Helen Miranda Wilson, Rose Basile, Ron Shuebrook, Susan Baker, and Sharli Powers Land.

ACME Fine Art and Design is located at 38 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts, 02116. Summer Hours are 11:00 to 5:30 Wednesday through Saturday, and by appointment. For further information about the exhibition or the artists please contact ACME Fine Art at info@acmefineart.com or 617.585.9551. The entire exhibition will be viewable at www.acmefineart.com.