LESTER JOHNSON – Figurative Oil Paintings from the 1960s

7 September – 6 October, 2007

ACME Fine Art’s Fall season will open on Friday, 7 September 2007 with an exhibition of oil paintings by the noted figurative expressionist artist Lester Johnson. A reception at the gallery from six to eight that evening will kick off the exhibition.

Lester Johnson is one of the relative handful of avant-garde artists who abandoned non-figurative painting in the 1950s in order to harness the power of the human figure as a primary vehicle for artistic self-expression. Today Johnson is recognized as one of the most important and influential painters of his generation. Since his first solo exhibition at New York’s Artists Gallery in 1951, Johnson’s work has been featured in more than 100 solo exhibitions, and included in important group exhibitions at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Whitney Museum of American Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Museum of Modern Art, Art Institute of Chicago, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, to name just a few. Lester Johnson’s work is in the permanent public collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Museum of Modern Art, National Museum of American Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Carnegie Museum of Art, and the Fogg Art Museum at Harvard University. (Complete lists of permanent Collections and Exhibitions, and a chronology is available on-line at acmefineart.com.)

ACME Fine Art’s first solo exhibition of Lester Johnson’s work will feature fifteen oil paintings from what was a pivotal decade for Johnson: the 1960s. During the 1960s the Martha Jackson Gallery in New York, and the H.C.E. and the Sun galleries in Provincetown were frequent venues for Johnson’s contemporary work. It was also during this decade that Johnson’s paintings were selected for inclusion in seminal exhibitions at the Smithsonian Institution, the Museum of Modern Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art. His canvases from this period are bold and vigorously expressive regardless of scale, and they demonstrate a poetic virtuosity that has become Lester Johnson’s hallmark.

Much has been written about Lester Johnson and his work from the 1960s. The quotations selected for this piece were chosen for their eloquence and insight into the artist and his work, and they are intended to both illuminate the paintings, and to shed light on Lester Johnson’s place in American art history. Speaking about his own work from this period Johnson said the following: “There is no balance in my paintings because balance seems to me to be static. Life, which I try to reflect in my paintings, is dynamic…. To me my paintings are action paintings -paintings that move across the canvas, paintings that do not get stuck, but flow like time.” To which the noted critic and art historian Dore Ashton added: “And so they did.”

LESTER JOHNSON: Oil Paintings from the 1960s will be on view at ACME Fine Art, Boston through 6 October 2007. ACME Fine Art is located at 38 Newbury Street in Boston’s Back Bay neighborhood. Gallery hours are 11:00 to 5:30 Tuesday through Saturday.

George Lloyd

George Lloyd
(1945- )

Education
1963-1967 Rhode Island School of Design, BFA
1967-1969 Yale University School of Art and Architecture, MFA

Awards
1994 Pollock-Krasner Foundation. Also 2006-07.
1995 Elizabeth Foundation Grant

Residency
2002 Visiting Artist, American Academy in Rome.

Teaching Appointments
1969-1970 University of California, Berkeley, CA. Also 1947-1975.
1972-1973 San Francisco Academy of Art, San Francisco, CA.
1975-1976 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR.
1982 Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.
1987 University of Southern Maine, Portland/Gorham, ME. Also 2008-2009.

Solo Exhibitions
1974-1975 John Bolles Gallery, San Francisco, CA.
1975 George Lloyd: Drawings, The Center Gallery, University of California Extension, San Francisco, CA.
1978 Lawson de Celle Gallery, San Francisco, CA. Also 1980.
1980 Center for the Arts, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CA.
1983 Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, CT.
Davison Art Center, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT.
Dana Reich Gallery, San Francisco, CA.
1985 Portland Performing Arts Center, Portland, ME.
1986 Victor Fischer Galleries, Oakland, CA.
1990 Shasta College Art Gallery, Redding, CA.
1994 George Lloyd – The Bay Area Years: 1971-1982, Kennedy Art Gallery, Holy Names College, Oakland, CA.
1996 George Lloyd: Paintings, Caldbeck Gallery, Rockland, ME.
2000 George Lloyd – Paintings from the early 1970s, Hackett-Freedman Gallery, San Francisco, CA.
2001 George Lloyd – The Maine Years: Paintings 1982-2000, Ogunquit Museum of American Art, Ogunquit, ME.
2003 George Lloyd – The Transition Years, 1982-1984, University of Maine Museum of Art, Bangor, ME.
George Lloyd – Figurative Paintings and Drawings from the early ‘90s, Aucocisco Gallery, Portland, ME.
2006 George Lloyd – Between Plan and Elevation, Portland Museum of Art, Portland, ME.
2007 George Lloyd: Paintings from the 70s & 80s, ACME Fine Art, Boston.
2009 Greenhut Gallery, Portland, ME

Selected Group Exhibitions
1969 New Talent, Alpha Gallery, Boston, MA.
1973 Brown, Bischoff, Cook, Lloyd, Charles Campbell Gallery, San Francisco.
Brown, Bischoff, Cook, Lloyd, Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, CA.
1974 Visiting Faculty Show, Worth Ryder Gallery, University of California, Berkeley, CA
1977 Bay Area Artists Exhibition, Oakland Museum, Oakland, CA.
Six East Bay Painters, Oakland Museum, Oakland, CA.
1978 Five Berkeley Artists, Ohlone College, Fremont, CA.
Metaphor in Painting, Federal Hall National Memorial, New York, NY.
1979 Art and Technology, Center for the Visual Arts, Oakland, CA.
1980 A Drawing Show, Santa Rosa Junior College, Santa Rosa, CA.
1981 Architectural Subjects, School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA.
1982 Cornell Faculty Show, Johnson Museum, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.
1988 Art and Architecture, Hobe Sound Gallery, Portland, ME.
Fine Arts Work Center, Provincetown, MA.
1989 Faculty Exhibition, University Art Museum, Santa Barbara, CA.
1992 167th Annual Exhibition, National Academy of Design, New York, NY.
1994 The Breakfast Group: 20th Anniversary Show, Landes Gallery,
Berkeley, CA.
1996 The Invented Figure, Chuck Levitan Gallery, New York, NY.
1998 Maine Biennial, Portland Museum of Art, Portland, ME.
1999 Drawing without Models: Works by George Lloyd, Abby Shahn, Joe Slusky & Chip Sullivan, Wiegand Gallery, Notre Dame College,
Belmont, CA.
2001 Abstraction: 22 Visions, Maine Art Gallery, Wiscasset, ME.
A Landscape Show, BACCA 1010, Berkeley, CA.
2003 The Abstracted Landscape, Center for Maine Contemporary Art, Rockport, ME.
2006 Geometry and Abstraction, ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA.
2007 Maine Modern II, ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
2008 Figuratively Speaking, George Marshall Store Gallery, York, ME.
The Portland Show, Greenhut Gallery, Portland, ME.

Selected Collections
Achenbach Foundation, California Palace of the Legion of Honor, San Francisco, CA.
California Palace of the Legion of Honor, San Francisco, CA.
De Saisset Museum, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA.
Oakland Museum, Oakland, CA.
Ogunquit Museum of American Art, Ogunquit, ME.
Portland Museum of Art, Portland, ME.
University Art Museum, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA.
University of Maine Museum of Art, Bangor, ME.

Biography
George Lloyd is a Boston native who studied painting with Richard Merkin and Robert Hamilton at the Rhode Island School of Design and with Lester Johnson and Jack Tworkov while earning his M.F.A. at Yale University. In the late 1960s Lloyd accepted a teaching position at the University of California at Berkeley, and joined a figure drawing group that included among its members, Joan Brown, Gordon Cook, and Elmer Bischoff. The group met weekly, and collectively became an important influence on Lloyd’s work from that period.

Subsequent to teaching at U.C. Berkeley, Lloyd has held teaching positions at the University of Oregon, Wesleyan University, and Cornell University. He has been the recipient of Pollock Krasner and Elizabeth Foundation Grants. Lloyd’s work has been included in exhibitions at the Oakland (CA) Museum of Art and solo exhibitions of his work have been mounted at Wesleyan University, the Ogunquit Museum of American Art, the University of Maine Museum of Art, and most recently (2006) at the Portland Museum of Art (ME).

Lloyd resides in Portland, Maine since 1983.

Lester Johnson

Lester Johnson
(1919-2010)

 

Education

Minneapolis School of Art, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
St. Paul Art School, St. Paul, Minnesota
The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois.
FELLOWSHIPS AND AWARDS:
1939 Alfred Pillsbury Scholarship.
1940-’41 The President’s Scholarship, Minneapolis School of Fine Arts, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
1941 St. Paul Gallery Scholarship.
1942 First Prize, Midwestern Artists Competition.
1961 Longview Fellowship, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
1973 Guggenheim Fellowship.
1978 Brandeis University, Creative Arts Award for Painting.
1987 Elected Associate, National Academy of Design.
2003 American Academy of Arts and Letters, Jimmy Ernst Award.
2004 Elected Member, American Academy of Arts and Letters.

Selected Solo Exhibitions

1951 Artists Gallery, New York.
1954 Korman Gallery, New York.
Sun Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
1955 Zabriskie Gallery, New York.
1956 Sun Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
1957 Zabriskie Gallery, New York.
Sun Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
1958 Zabriskie Gallery, New York.
Sun Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
1959 Zabriskie Gallery, New York.
Sun Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
City Gallery, New York.
1960 Sun Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
HCE Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
1961 Minneapolis Art Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Zabriskie Gallery, New York.
Ohio State University Gallery, Columbus, Ohio.
1962 Martha Jackson Gallery, New York.
BC Holland Gallery, New York.
Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.
Dayton Art Institute, Dayton, Ohio.
Ohio State University Museum, Columbus, Ohio.
HCE Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
1963 Martha Jackson Gallery, New York.
1964 The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, Connecticut.
Martha Jackson Gallery, New York.
1965 Donald Morris Gallery, Detroit, Michigan.
Yale University Art Museum, New Haven, Connecticut.
Anderson-Mayer Gallery, Paris, France.
1966 Martha Jackson Gallery, New York.
1967 The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, Connecticut.
Donald Morris Gallery, Detroit, Michigan.
Martha Jackson Gallery, New York.
Temple Shalom, New York.
1968 Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC.
CCAC Gallery, California College of Arts and Crafts, Oakland, California.
1969 Martha Jackson Gallery, New York.
BC Holland Gallery, Chicago, Illinois.
1971 The Human Situation: Street Scenes 1969-71, Martha Jackson Gallery, New York.
Merridin Gallery, London, England.
1972 Alpha Gallery, Boston, Massachusetts.
Tirca Karlis Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
1973 Martha Jackson Gallery, New York.
Gallery Moos, Ltd., Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Richard Gray Gallery, Chicago, Illinois.
Ruth Schaffner Gallery, Santa Barbara, California.
Smith Andersen Gallery, San Francisco, California.
1974 William Cooper Proctor Art Center, Bard College, Annandale-On-Hudson, New York.
Ruth Schaffner Gallery, Los Angeles, California.
Galerie Smith-Anderson, Palo Alto, California.
Donald Morris Gallery, Detroit, Michigan.
1975 Early Works, Livingston-Learmonth Gallery, New York.
Martha Jackson Gallery, New Uork.
Jorgensen Gallery, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut.
1976 Alpha Gallery, Boston, Massachusetts.
1977 The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, Connecticut.
The City, Gimpel & Weitzenhoffer Gallery, New York.
Hurlbutt Gallery, Greenwich Library, Greenwich, Connecticut.
Gallery Moos Ltd., Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
1978 Donald Morris Gallery, Detroit, Michigan.
Ruth Schaffner Gallery, Los Angeles, California.
Peter M. David Gallery, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
1979 Gimpel Fils, London, England.
Foster Gallery, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
1980 Street Scenes, Gimpel & Weitzenhoffer Gallery, New York.
Swain School of Art, New Bedford, Massachusetts.
Gimpel-Hanover & Andre Emmerich Galerien, Zurich, Switzerland.
1981 Donald Morris Gallery, Detroit, Michigan.
University of Virginia Art Museum, Charlottesville, Virginia.
1982 Alpha Gallery, Boston, Massachusetts.
Gimpel & Weitzenhoffer Gallery, New York.
Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, Connecticut.
1983 The Early Paintings 1957-67, Zabriskie Gallery, New York.
The PaperWork Gallery, Larchmont, New York.
Chicago International Art Fair (Donald Morris Gallery), Chicago, Illinois.
1984 Munson Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut.
Kansas City Art Institute, Kansas City, Missouri.
1985 David Barnett Gallery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
Zabriskie Gallery, New York.
Donald Morris Gallery, Detroit, Michigan.
1986 Gallery Moos Ltd., Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Munson Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut.
1987 The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, Connecticut.
Westmoreland Museum of Art, Greensburg, PA.
Works on Paper 1960-87, Jack Schainman Gallery, Washington, DC.
Gallery Moos Ltd., Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Gallery Moos Ltd., New York.
1988 Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois.
Munson Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut.
35 Years of Prints, Cone Editions, New York.
Goldman-Kraft Gallery, Chicago, Illinois.
Recent Works, Walter Moos Gallery, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, Connecticut.
1989 Retrospective, David Barnett Gallery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
1990 Gimpel & Weitzenhoffer Gallery, New York.
Paris-New York, Kent Fine Arts, Kent, Connecticut.
1991 A Print Retrospective 1960-1990, Erector Square Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut.
Donald Morris Gallery, Birmingham, Michigan.
1992 Margaret Lipworth Gallery, Boca Raton, Florida.
Eva Cohon Gallery, Chicago, Illinois.
1993 Jack Rutberg Fine Arts, Los Angeles, California.
1994 Edward Thorp Gallery, New York.
David Barnett Gallery, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
1995 Margaret Lipworth Gallery, Boca Raton, Florida.
1996 Norwalk Community Technical College, Norwalk, Connecticut.
UFO Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
Denise Cade Gallery in association with Joseph Rickards Fine Art, New York.
Peter Findlay Gallery, New York.
1998 Peter Findlay Gallery, New York.
France & America, Denise Cade & with Joseph Rickards Fine Art, New York.
An Overview of the Graphic Work, Joseph Rickards Fine Art, New York.
1999 David Klein Gallery, Birmingham, Michigan.
2000 Albert Merola Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
2001 Lester Johnson Figurative Expressionism: Paintings 1963-2000, Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
Provincetown Watercolors from the 1950s, Albert Merola Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
2002 Peter Findlay Gallery, New York.
Lillian Heidenberg Gallery, West Palm Beach, Florida.
Albert Merola Gallery, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
2003 Early and Late Works, David Klein Gallery, Birmingham, Michigan.
2004 Lester Johnson: Four Decades of Painting, James Goodman Gallery, New York.
2005 People Passing By: Paintings, Drawings and Prints by Lester Johnson, William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut at Storrs, Connecticut (retrospective).
2006 Paintings, Drawings and Prints by Lester Johnson 1955-2005, David Klein Gallery, Birmingham, Michigan.
Beach Series, East Hampton, David Klein Gallery, Birmingham, Michigan.
2007 Lester Johnson Figurative Oil Paintings from the 1960s, ACME Fine Art and Design, Boston, Massachusetts.
2009 Lester Johnson: 1950s Works on Paper, ACME Fine Art and Design, Boston, Massachusetts.
2010 Lester Johnson: The ‘60s, David Klein Gallery, Birmingham, Michigan.
2011 Lester Johnson Memorial Exhibition, ACME Fine Art and Design, Boston, Massachusetts

Selected Group Exhibitions

1949 Annual Watercolor Exhibition, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
1951 Annual Watercolor Exhibition, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
1955 813 Broadway Gallery, New York.
1956 Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Artists of the New York School: Second Generation, The Jewish Museum, New York.
1957 Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Stable Gallery, New York.
American Painting 1945-1957, Minneapolis Institute of Art, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
1958 Annual, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.
Critics Choice, The Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, Maryland.
1959 100 Works on Paper, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, Massachusetts.
Ellison Gallery, Fort Worth, Texas.
Art U.S.A., Sarah Lawrence College, Bronxville, New York.
Painting Annual, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado.
Salzburg Festival, Germany.
Nebraska Art Association, Lincoln, Nebraska.
1960 Figure in Contemporary Painting, American Federation of Arts, New York.
Future Classics, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, Massachusetts.
Felix Landau Gallery, Los Angeles, California.
Critics Choice, City and Town School, New York.
Graphics 1960, American Federation of Arts, New York.
Pursuit and Measurement of Excellence, Weatherspoon Art Gallery, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, North Carolina.
Nebraska Annual, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska.
1961 The Emerging Figure, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Houston, Texas.
Carnegie International, The Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Recent Painting and Sculpture, The Museum of Modern Art, New York.
1962 Recent Paintings U.S.A.: The Figure, The Museum of Modern Art, New York.
Recent Trends in Painting, USA, The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.
1963 L’Avant-Garde, Musee Cantonal des Beaux-Arts, Lausanne, Switzerland.
Eleven Americans, Martha Jackson Gallery, New York.
Ohio State University Museum, Columbus, Ohio.
Selections from the Fort Worth Collections, Fort Worth Art Center, Fort Worth, Texas.
1964 Annual Exhibition, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Contemporary American Drawings, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York.
Carnegie International, The Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Figuration into Abstraction, Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Ghent, Belgium.
Portraits from the American Art World, New School Art Center, The New School for Social Research, New York.
The American Conscience, New School Art Center, The New School for Social Research, New York.
Old Hundred, Aldrich Museum, Ridgefield, Connecticut.
1965 American Federation of Arts, New York.
Figuration, Martha Jackson Gallery, New York.
Bucknell University, Lewisburg, Pennsylvania.
1966 Zabriskie Gallery, New York.
Thirteenth Annual, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.
Contemporary Urban Visions, New School Art Center, The New School for Social Research, New York.
New Figuration, Harpur College, Binghamton, New York.
A Point of View, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan.
1967 1967 Annual, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.
The 1960s, The Museum of Modern Art, New York.
Carnegie International, The Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, Connecticut.
Fourteenth Annual, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.
Homage to Morandi, The School of Visual Arts, New York.
Junior Council Purchase Show, Fort Worth Art Center, Fort Worth, Texas.
A Christmas Show, Martha Jackson Gallery, New York.
1968 Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.
Social Comment in American Art, The Museum of Modern Art, New York.
American Paintings on the Market Today, Cincinnati Art Museum, Cincinnati, Ohio.
The Figure: A New Vein 1963-1968, Center of Visual Arts Institute Torcuato Di Tella, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
Buffalo Art Festival, The Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York.
Six Painters from the Martha Jackson Gallery, University of Texas, Austin, Texas.
Figuration, The New School for Social Research, New York.
Ravina Festival, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois.
Akron Art Center, Akron, Ohio.
Timeless Paintings from the U.S.A., Paul Facchetti Gallery, Paris, France.
The Poetry of Vision, ROSC, Dublin, Ireland.
Paintings for Your Collection, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, Rhode Island.
Project Outreach, Detroit Institute of the Arts, Detroit, Michigan.
1969 The New Vein: The Human Figure 1963-68, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC.
Philadelphia Art Alliance, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Fondation Marguerite et Aime Maeght L’Art Vivant aux etats Unis, St. Paul-de-Vence, France.
Il Bienal Internacional del Deporte en las Bellas Artes, Madrid, Spain.
Dealers’ Choice, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona.
Paintings Courtesy of Martha Jackson, John Bolles Gallery, San Francisco, California.
1970 The Thomas Edward Benesch Memorial Exhibition of his Collection, The Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, Maryland.
Carnegie International, The Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
L’Art Vivant aux Etats Unis, Fondation Marguerite et Aime Maeght, St. Paul-de-Vence, France.
Regards Privileges 1951-70, Galerie Paul Facchetti, Paris, France.
Artists of Suffolk County – Part III Figurative Tradition, Heckscher Museum, Huntington, New York.
Works on Paper, Virginia Museum, Richmond, Virginia.
1971 18th Annual Exhibition: From Madison Avenue to the Sohos, Jewish Community Center, Bayone, New Jersey.
Homage to Tanager, Roko Gallery, New York.
Martha Jackson Gallery Collection, Seibu Department Store, Tokyo, Japan.
Painting and Sculpture Invitational Show, New England Art, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
Art on Paper, Weatherspoon Art Gallery, University of North Carolina, Greensboro, North Carolina.
1972 70th American Exhibition, The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.
Ten Independents – An Artist Initiated Exhibition, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York.
Seventeenth National Print Exhibition, Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn, New York.
Cross-Section New York 1972, Hamilton College, Clinton, New York.
Martha Jackson Collection, Rockland Community College, Suffern, New York.
Contemporary Painting, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.
118 Artists, Landmark Gallery, New York.
Immagine per la Citta, Palazzo dell’Academia, Palazzo Reale, Genoa, Italy.
1973 Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.
L’Estampes Contemporaine, La Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris, France.
Voices of Alarm, Lerner-Heller Gallery, New York.
Drawings U.S.A. ’73, Minnesota Museum of Art, St. Paul, Minnesota.
The Private Collection of Martha Jackson, The Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York.
1974 Nineteenth National Print Exhibition, Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn, New York.
1975 Subject Matter, Landmark Gallery, New York.
1976 Painting and Sculpture Today, The Indianapolis Museum of Art, Indianapolis, Indiana.
Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, New York.
Visions: The Paintings and Sculptures of Distinguished Alumni, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.
1977 Tenth Street Days: The Co-ops of the 50s, Pleiadea Art Gallery, New York.
Manscape 77, Oklahoma Art Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
Provincetown Artists, Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
Fall 77: Contemporary Collectors, The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, Connecticut.
1978 Connecticut Painting, Drawing and Sculpture 1978, New Britain Museum of American Art, New Britain, Connecticut.
A Benefit for the Yale School of Art: Works by Members of the Yale Faculty 1950-78, Harold Reed Gallery, New York.
Connecticut Painting, Drawing and Sculpture 1978, Cummings Art Center, Connecticut College, New London, Connecticut.
From the Imagination, Green Mountain Gallery, New York.
Connecticut Painting, Drawing and Sculpture 1978, Carlson Art Gallery, University of Bridgeport, Connecticut.
1979 Alumni of School of the Art Institute, The Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.
Collection: Art in American After World War II, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York.
Art in Bloom, Washington County Museum of Art, Hagerstown, Maryland.
Masters of the Portrait, The Oklahoma Museum of Art, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
1980 James Joyce in Perspective, Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
Portraits Real and Imagined, Guild Hall Museum, East Hampton, New York.
Selected 20th Century American Self Portraits, Harold Reed Gallery, New York.
Masters of American Watercolor, The Oklahoma Museum of Art, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
1981 The Sun Gallery, Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
12th Annual Invitational Exhibitions of Paintings by Figurative Painters, Moravian College, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.
1982 Homo Sapiens, The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, Connecticut.
In Our Time, Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, Texas.
Neuberger Museum of Art, SUNY, Purchase, New York.
Contemporary Masters, Hamilton College Museum, Clinton, New York.
American Figurative Expressionism 1950-1960, Marilyn Pearl Gallery, New York.
The Changing Figure 1962-1982, Landmark Gallery, New York.
Street Painters, Lever House, New York.
1983 Connecticut Painters 7+7+7, Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, Connecticut.
Selections from the Permanent Collection, Guild Hall Museum, East Hampton, New York.
The Painterly Figure, Monique Knowlton Gallery, New York.
Contemporary Prints, Munson Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut.
American Realism 1930s-1980s, A Contemporary Perspective, Summit Art Center, Summit, New Jersey.
Paintings and Sculpture in the Permanent Collection, University of Arizona Museum of Art, Tucson, Arizona.
1984 Figurative Expressionism, Art Museum Association of America, San Francisco, California.
The First Eight Years, Artists’ Choice Museum, New York.
Aspects of the City, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
David Haynes – Lester Johnson, Joseloff Gallery, University of Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut.
Twentieth Century American Drawing from the Arkansas Art Center Foundation Collection, The Arkansas Art Center, Little Rock, Arkansas.
1985 The Artist Celebrates New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
Martha Jackson Memorial Collection, Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC.
Federal Support for the Permanent Collection, Guild Hall Museum, East Hampton, New York.
Prints Ensuite, The Katonah Gallery, Katonah, New York.
Expressionism: An American Beginning, Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, Massachusetts.
Two Americans, Zabriskie Gallery, Paris, France.
1986 Naked/Nude Print Exhibition, The Museum of Modern Art, New York.
1995 The Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase, New York.
Editions 1974-1991, Pharos Gallery, New York.
Editions, Skoto Gallery, New York.
2001 Out of the Fifties – Into the Sixties: Six Figurative Expressionists, Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, New York.
2002 Ten Realists, Mitchell Algus Gallery, New York.
20th Anniversary Exhibition, Denise Cade Gallery, New York.
2003 Visions and Revisions: Art on Paper since 1960, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts.
Invitational Exhibition of Painting and Sculpture, American Academy of Arts and Letters, New York.
Contemporary Art from Nashville Collections, First Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville, Tennessee.
2004 Gallery Moos, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
2007 Black and White and a little red… David Klein Gallery, Birmingham, Michigan.
Figuratively Speaking, ACME Fine Art and Design, Boston, Massachusetts.
2008 Summer Salon, ACME Fine Art and Design, Boston, Massachusetts.
Works on Paper, ACME Fine Art and Design, Boston, Massachusetts.
2009 Days Lumberyard Studios 1915-1972, ACME Fine Art and Design, Boston, Massachusetts.
2010 Have you been good? David Klein Gallery, Birmingham, Michigan.
Summer Salon, ACME Fine Art and Design, Boston, Massachusetts.
Days Lumberyard Studios, Hudson D. Walker Gallery, Fine Arts Work Center, Provincetown, Massachusetts.

Lester Johnson. Giuliano photo.

Selected Collections

Harry N. Abrams Inc. Publishers, New York.
The Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York.
The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, Connecticut.
Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois.
The Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore, Maryland.
Boca Raton Museum, Boca Raton, Florida.
The Bruce Museum, Greenwich, Connecticut.
The Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
The Chase Manhattan Bank, New York.
The Chrysler Museum, Norfolk, Virginia.
Dayton Art institute, Dayton, Ohio.
The Detroit Institute of Art, Detroit, Michigan.
Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University Museums, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Fort Lauderdale Museum, Fort Lauderdale, Florida.
Fort Worth Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas.
The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, New York.
Guild Hall, East Hampton, New York.
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC.
Honolulu Academy of Arts, Honolulu, Hawaii.
Housatonic Museum of Art, Bridgeport, Connecticut.
Kalamazoo Institute of Arts, Kalamazoo, Michigan.
Madison Art Center, Madison, Wisconsin,
The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
Milwaukee Union Art Gallery, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
Minneapolis Institute of Art, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, Rhode Island.
The Museum of Modern Art, New York
The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts.
National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC.
Neuberger Museum SUNY, Purchase, New York.
The New Jersey State Museum, Trenton, New Jersey.
The New School for Social Research, New York.
The New York Public Library, New York.
Orton Museum, Ohio State University, Dayton, Ohio.
Phoenix Art Museum, Phoenix, Arizona.
Rose Art Museum, Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts.
Sheldon Memorial Art Gallery, University of Nebraska Art Galleries, Lincoln, Nebraska.
U.S. Steel Corporation, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
University of Arizona Museum of Art, Tucson, Arizona.
Westmoreland Museum of Art, Greensburg, Pennsylvania.
Wadsworth Athenaeum, Hartford, Connecticut.
The Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.
Wichita Art Museum, Wichita, Kansas.
Williams College Museum of Art, Williamstown, Massachusetts.
Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut.

Biography

Lester Johnson was born in 1919 in Minneapolis, Minnesota; the youngest of seven and grandchild of Swedish Homesteaders. After studying at the Minneapolis School of Art, and the St. Paul Art School, he came, in 1947, to New York City. His first studio (and home) was next door to Wolf Kahn on 6th Street and Avenue A, followed by a loft on St. Mark’s Place which he shared with Larry Rivers. He married Josephine Valenti, an art historian, in 1949, and moved into a house on 2nd Ave and 2nd Street – which was shared, again, with Wolf Kahn. After moving uptown, he continued to work downtown, in a studio on 222 Bowery. In 1961, he briefly left the city for an artist-in-residence position at Ohio State. After returning, and while sharing a studio on 10th St. with Philip Pearlstein, he was invited by Jack Tworkov to teach at Yale. He accepted and he and his wife, with their two children, Leslie and Anthony, moved to Milford, CT, where he taught and continued to paint in a studio behind their house. Summers were spent in Springs, Long Island (where Lester and Jo bought property in 1955), throughout his time at Yale as well as after moving to Greenwich, CT. Later, he had four grandchildren: Stephanie, Julia, Nicholas, and Abby. Johnson lived briefly in Southampton where he died in 2010.

Chronology

1919 Born January 27 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
1939 Alfred Pillsbury Scholarship.
1940-’41 The President’s Scholarship, Minneapolis School of Fine Arts, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
1941 St. Paul Gallery Scholarship.
1942 First Prize, Midwestern Artists Competition.
1941-’47 Studies at the Minneapolis School of Art, St. Paul Art School, and The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.
1947 Moves to New York, where he became one of the first downtown loft-dwellers, sharing a studio with Larry Rivers. Attended classes at the Hans Hofmann School of Fine Arts.
1948 Views a show of Giacometti paintings at the Pierre Matisse Gallery, which influences his painterly style.
1949 Marries Josephine Valenti. Shared a studio with figurative realist Philip Pearlstein.
1950 First solo exhibition, Artists Gallery, New York.
1961 Longview Fellowship, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
1961-’62 Artist-In-Residence, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.
1964 Begins teaching figure drawing at Yale, where he teaches until his retirement in 1989. Summer Artist-In-Residence, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
1969 Became Director of Studies for the Graduate Painting Program at Yale, an appointment that would last until 1974.
1973 Guggenheim Fellowship.
1978 Brandeis University Creative Arts Award for Painting.
1987 Elected Associate of the National Academy of Design. Brandeis University, Creative Arts Award for Painting.
2003 American Academy of Arts and Letters, Jimmy Ernst Award.
2004 Survey exhibition of his work at James Goodman Gallery, New York, Lester Johnson: Four Decades of Painting. Elected Member, American Academy of Arts and Letters.
2005 Fifty year retrospective, People Passing By: Paintings, Drawings and Prints by Lester Johnson, William Benton Museum of Art, University of Connecticut at Storrs.
2010 Dies May 30.

ROSE BASILE – In Provincetown

4 May – 9 June, 2007

The work of the noted contemporary artist Rose Basile will be featured in a solo exhibition of her recent oil paintings at ACME Fine Art in Boston. The exhibition will open with a reception from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. on Friday evening 4 May 2007, and will be on view through Saturday June 9.

Rose Basile chronicles through her paintings the day to day life of the common person on Cape Cod and coastal New England. Basile uses symbolism, and formal composition to elevate and transform how we see what might otherwise seem mundane. She does so with a willingness to address political issues without regard for political correctness and with a sense of humor that proves itself to be universal. There is an apparent lack of self-consciousness in Basile’s aesthetic that connects her to a visual tradition of twentieth century Provincetown artists such as Oliver Chaffee, Marsden Hartley and Mary Hackett. While there may be thematic similarities with these artists as well, Basile’s canvases speak in a strong voice that is hers alone.

For ACME Fine Art’s first solo exhibition of paintings by Ms. Basile, Gallery Director David Cowan has selected a group of paintings that date from as early as 2000, which were painted in Basile’s Provincetown studio. Several of the paintings are from the artist’s acclaimed Fishermen Series that was exhibited in 2004 at the Roche Jones Duff House & Garden Museum in New Bedford Massachusetts. The Fishermen Series was created over the course of a decade -between 1993 and 2003- as a lamentation of the dying fishing industry. Many of the paintings from this series employ Christian iconography, and draw on renaissance compositional traditions that together achieve a powerfully mannered 21st century artistic statement. Literary references abound in Ms. Basile’s work, and one important example that will be featured in the ACME Fine Art exhibition is an almost monochromatic painting titled Don Quixote of Nantucket Sound that addresses the political debate over windmill farms proposed off the Cape Cod coastline.

GRACE MARTIN TAYLOR – White-line Woodblock Prints, Printing Blocks & Monotypes

4 May – 9 June, 2007

On Friday 4 May 2007 an exhibition of white-line woodblock (“Provincetown”) prints by the noted artist Grace Martin Taylor (1903-1995) will open at ACME Fine Art in Boston. The exhibition will feature more than one dozen of Taylor’s distinctive white-line prints, which were created in small editions between 1928 and 1985. In addition, a fine selection of rare watercolors and drawings that were studies for the prints will be shown alongside them. Another important highlight of the exhibition will be the first-ever exhibition of three double-sided, hand-carved, wooden printing blocks created by Ms. Taylor during the 1930s. This also marks the first time that any of the artist’s color wood printing blocks have been offered for sale.

Her cousin and mentor, Blanche Lazzell, introduced Grace Martin Taylor to the printmaking technique that led to what is now commonly referred to as the “Provincetown” print. It was Lazzell who encouraged Taylor to travel to Provincetown to study. In her first summer there Taylor took a course of fifteen private two-hour lessons from her cousin in what Lazzell called “Color Wood Block Printing, one block method.” Both women were West Virginia natives who came to spend many a summer in Provincetown, where they enjoyed the collegial atmosphere of the art colony, and where they produced some of what is now considered their best work. One of Grace Martin Taylor’s earliest efforts in the Provincetown Printing technique –possibly done during her first summer there- is titled Sails and Gulls, and it will figure prominently in the ACME Fine Art exhibition.

Grace MartinTaylor earned her A.B. and M.A. degrees from the University of West Virginia. In addition to studying with Blanche Lazzell, she also studied with Henry McCarter, and Arthur Carles at the Pennsylvania Academy, with Emil Bisttram in Taos, New Mexico, and with Hans Hofmann at his School of Fine Art in Provincetown. Taylor’s work has been exhibited extensively. Notable venues include: the Metropolitan Museum of Art, National Academy of Design, Smithsonian Institution, Baltimore Museum of Art, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Brooklyn Museum, Virginia Museum of Fine Art, and the National Museum of Women in the Arts. Most recently, four of her white-line woodblock prints were featured in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston’s 2002 exhibition From Paris to Provincetown.

ACME Fine Art’s exhibition of print work by Grace Martin Taylor will open with a reception between 6 and 8 on the evening of Friday, 4 May 2007. ACME Fine Art is located at 38 Newbury Street in Boston’s Back Bay neighborhood. Gallery hours are 11:00 to 5:30 Tuesday through Saturday.

Kenneth Stubbs

Kenneth Stubbs (1907-1967)

kennethstubbs

Born July 13, 1907, Ochlocknee, Georgia
Died October 20, 1967, Washington, D.C.
Studies

Corcoran School of Art. Washington, D.C.1926 to 1930
Webster School of Art, Provincetown, Massachusetts, June-October 1931 and 1934
Wicker School of Art, Detroit Michigan, June-October 1933
Academia della Bella Arte, Florence, Italy, January- April 1950
Employment

Advertising art, Detroit, Michigan 1932-1935. Included painting billboards, e.g. one for Chicken-of-the-Sea
Instructor/Professor, Painting and Drawing, Corcoran School of Art, Washington, D.C. 1935-1953
Professor of Art, George Washington University, D.C. 1941-1953
Free lance artist, self-employed, 1937-1942
United States Navy, 1942-1945
Films: story board artist, script writer and director of films for industry and the Federal Government, specializing in design and planning of animation films, 1945-1967
Art Career And Works

Some 15 one-man shows, chiefly in the Washington, D.C. and Cape Cod areas, including Acme Fine Art, Marin-Price Galleries, Franz Bader Gallery, Whyte Gallery
Exhibited extensively and actively in DC and Cape Cod areas, including Corcoran, Baltimore Museum of Art, Detroit Institute of Arts, Provincetown Art Museum
Represented in numerous collections
Took pride in fact that his paintings and drawings were acquired by people in all walks of life
Murals on history of United States Army and its equipment and on children’s classics
Illustrated Edward Lasker’s 1951 book, Chess Secrets, with numerous portraits of the great chess masters
Awards and Honors

National and International Awards for film work
1946-1947 Venice Film Festival Award
Memorial Endowments at Provincetown Art Association Museum, Corcoran School of Art, Fine Arts Work Center and Colquitt County Community Art Center
Organizational Memberships

National Honor Society
Boy Scouts (Star Scout — 37 merit badges)
Capital City Chess Club
Washington Chess Divan
American Go Association
Washington Board of Trade
Washington Water Color Club
Washington Landscape Club
Artists Guild of Washington, Treasurer
Society of Washington Artists, Executive Committee, V.P.
Alumni Association of the Corcoran School (founder and first president)
The Beachcombers, Provincetown, MA
Provincetown Art Association, life member
Screenwriters Guild
Significant Miscellany

Married October 1948
Member, Provincetown Beachcombers, 1938-1967
Summer residence in Provincetown last decade of his life
Journeyman rank chess player, played in numerous tournaments
Early American player of Go, beginning in 1940’s when he taught himself enough Japanese to read Go magazines, the only literature on the game then available
Prolific writer of humor and historical works and lectures on art history, theory, analysis and practice
Wrote and illustrated unpublished book on the naval history of the Civil War
Filmed Piero della Francesca’s mural The Golden Legend in Arezzo, Italy

Some people ask what my objective is in painting. I prefer to think I have a position and a direction, rather than an objective. My position is based on a belief in the tradition of good painting as practiced by the Masters. My direction is based on the development and change that occur in my ideas about nature and life.
To be more specific, I feel that the structure of my painting is based on tradition – while the content is based on ideas. Where these two things – tradition and idea – meet in the form of my painting, they become real. First of all, the forms are real to me. Where they also say something, so much the better. If a modern statement is the result, it is modern simply because my interests are modern.
The fact that many of my paintings are concerned with flat or semi-flat patterns that depart more or less from the appearance of nature is simply a matter of style. This style comes from the need to have the entire painting, rather than the separate objects, express the idea. The fact that my watercolors and drawings are more nearly a reflection of nature is a matter of relaxed observation.
I hope this statement will add something to the understanding of my work and my attitude toward art.

As you know, artists always get into trouble when they write about their work. I hope that my paintings and drawings are better examples of my work than my written words are.

Kenneth Stubbs
Letter to Florence Berryman, Art Critic, The Washington Star, January 10, 1955

stubbs

Biography

Kenneth Stubbs was born in 1907 in Ochlocknee, Georgia. A lifelong artist, who began molding figures from Georgia clay in his early childhood, Kenneth Stubbs was strongly influenced by the Modernists in his late teens and twenties, then particularly by Cubists such as Juan Gris and Georges Braque. He had a deep interest in the Golden Section as the ideal proportion and devoted himself to analyzing its use by the masters through the centuries and to applying it to his own compositions. His paintings focused also on conveying a sense of motion in paintings characterized by cubist representation, largely with straight lines and color.

As one art critic put it,…

“the human intelligence is everywhere at work and it is heartening to see art in which this still a factor”

As Kenneth Stubbs put it,

“…the structure of my painting is based on tradition–while the content is based on ideas. Where these two things–tradition and idea–meet in the form of my painting, they become real…..the forms are real to me. Where they also say something, so much the better. if a modern statement is the result, it is modern simply because my interests are modern.

“The fact that many of my paintings are concerned with flat or semi-flat patterns that depart more or less from the appearance of nature is simply a matter of style. This style comes from the need to have the entire painting, rather than the separate objects, express the idea. The fact that my watercolors and drawings are more nearly a reflection of nature is a matter of relaxed observation.”

 

 

 

FIGURATIVELY SPEAKING

23 March – 28 April, 2007

For much of the twentieth century the concept of figuration in contemporary modern art was taboo. In the heyday of the Abstract Expressionist movement most avant-garde artists eliminated all traces of representation from their often-enormous “action” paintings. However, the power associated with the human figure was found compelling by a number of artists who, whether they were trained in the classical tradition or not, found themselves rebels, either against traditional representation or the concept of non-representation, or both. For the exhibition that opens on 23 March 2007, ACME Fine Art has assembled an excellent group of more than twenty paintings and drawings that together illustrate and explore how some notable twentieth century artists -all of whom considered their work “modern”- used figuration in their work.

The artwork making up the exhibition was created between 1915 and 2000, and this breadth of time is reflected in the visual variety of work that will make up the exhibition. The earliest painting in the exhibition is a 1915 tonal masterpiece by Edwin Dickinson called Boy Provincetown. Mid-century artwork by such artists as Jack Tworkow, Lester Johnson, Mercedes Matter, Bob Thompson, Dorothy Eisner, George McNeil, Stephen Pace, Tony Vevers, Maurice Freedman, and Jo Cain will be included. In addition to those of George McNeil important late twentieth century artwork by Robert Beauchamp, and the contemporary artist Simon Gaon will also be represented. Some of these artists have been categorized as “realists”, some as “figural expressionists” or “neo-expressionists”; while others defy categorization altogether. What the artists have in common, and what the artwork demonstrates, is the common understanding that the presence of the human figure by its very nature regardless of how it is rendered- enhances communication with the viewer, imparts tremendous power, and has the potential to convey a wide variety of human emotions.

ACME Fine Art’s exhibition of figurative artwork by modern artists is titled FIGURATIVELY SPEAKING, and it will open with a reception from six to eight in the evening on Friday 23 March 2007. The exhibition will run through 28 April 2007. The gallery is located at 38 Newbury Street in Boston’s Back Bay neighborhood. Gallery hours are 11:00 to 5:30 Tuesday through Saturday. Please contact the gallery at 617.585.9551 for further information.

NANNO de GROOT: EARTH, SEA & SKY

9 February – 17 March, 2007

ACME Fine Art’s exhibition NANNO DE GROOT: EARTH, SEA & SKY opens with a reception on Friday 9 February 2007 from 6 to 8 in the evening. The exhibition will feature a substantial group of important oil paintings form the artist’s Provincetown period. Gallery Director David Cowan collaborated with the artist’s widow, Pat de Groot, in selecting a group of paintings that would individually and collectively demonstrate the remarkable emotional range of this talented abstract expressionist painter, and that would also exemplify the simple yet powerful beauty that his late work achieves.

The Dutch born artist Nanno de Groot (1913-1963) emigrated to the U.S. following his service in the Dutch Navy in the early 1940s. His painting career began when he moved to New York City in the late 1940s, built a painting studio, and began painting in a highly sophisticated, abstract mode. The 1950s were a time of great creativity for de Groot. It was the height of the abstract expressionist movement in New York, where de Groot’s highly abstract, deftly expressed, linear figure canvasses were exhibited at the Stable Gallery, the Bertha Schaefer Gallery and at the Hansa Gallery. In the mid-1950s de Groot discovered the Provincetown art colony, and spent his first summer there in 1956. De Groot quickly became a prominent member of the Provincetown community of artists, where he regularly showed his work in solo exhibitions at Nat Halpert’s H.C.E. Gallery from that first summer on.

The early 1960s saw de Groot and his wife Pat buy land, then design, and build a house on the bay in Provincetown. By 1962, they had taken up permanent residence there. De Groot’s paintings from this period remained abstract; however, instead of using the human form as his inspiration, de Groot’s inspiration now came from the landscape around him. Most commonly he painted open fields, flowers, and the sea, and his work from the 1960s reflects and expresses this artist’s profound artistic connection with nature. There is a bravura and vitality about these paintings that also reflects the personality of the artist. The canvasses are typically thick with oil paint that appears to have been almost frenetically applied however elegant the result. De Groot’s fields wave as if in a wind created by the artist’s dramatic gesture, and his seas writhe with an underlying energy that is in no way dissipated by the medium. The overall effect is reminiscent of his Dutch kinsman Van Gogh’s late landscapes, but in a scale, and with a focussed expressive quality that is unique to Nanno de Groot.

ACME Fine Art’s exhibition NANNO DE GROOT: EARTH, SEA & SKY will be on view from 9 February through 17 March 2007. The exhibition will also be viewable on-line at www.acmefineart.com after 12 February.

GEORGE LLOYD (1945- ) PAINTINGS & DRAWINGS FROM TWO DECADES

5 January – 3 February, 2007

ACME Fine Art’s 2007 season will open with an exhibition of paintings and drawings conceived during the 1970s and 1980s by the noted artist George Lloyd. The exhibition will commence with a reception between 6:00 and 8:00 p.m. on Friday 5 January 2007, and will run through 3 February 2007.

As an undergraduate at the Rhode Island School of Design Lloyd studied with Richard Merkin, Robert Hamilton, and John Frazier. During the 1960s, while earning his graduate degree at Yale University, he studied under both Lester Johnson and Jack Tworkov. Since that time Lloyd has held teaching positions at the University of California, Berkeley, the University of Oregon, Wesleyan University, and Cornell University.

For ACME Fine Art’s first solo exhibition of paintings by George Lloyd gallery director David Cowan has elected to focus on the artist’s work from the 1970s and 1980s. This was a lively and productive period for Lloyd. During this time he lived first in California’s San Francisco Bay area and then in Eugene Oregon. The early 1980s saw Lloyd return to the northeast, ultimately settling in Portland Maine in 1984. In characterizing the work from this period, the artist divides the work from these two decades into three distinct “periods” all of which will be represented in the exhibition. They are the “Figurative”, the “Geometric” and the “Early Portland” periods. While these distinctions are apt and readily apparent upon viewing the work, what is also apparent is the artist’s consistently abstract point of view, his eye for fundamentally balanced yet dynamic composition, and an elegance of expression that is always confidently achieved through a variety of means. The resulting work is poetically forceful and sensitive, and usually contains a sense of careful consideration while also expressing a fundamental appreciation for the spontaneous gesture. Typically there is an underlying structure that in many cases gives the work an architectonic quality. This quality comes naturally to the artist, since he grew up in Boston in a family full of architects and since his early after-school employment was as an “office boy” in one of Boston’s oldest architecture firms.

George Lloyd’s debut in Boston came in 1969 when he was included in a group exhibition at the Alpha Gallery titled New Talent. Since that time Lloyd’s work has been included in group exhibitions at the University of California, Berkeley, the Oakland Museum, the National Academy of Design, and at the Center for Maine Contemporary Art. His list of solo exhibition venues includes: Davison Art Center, Wesleyan University, the Ogunquit Museum of American Art, the University of Maine Museum of Art, Bangor, and most recently (2006) at the Portland (ME) Museum of Art. Lloyd’s work is in the permanent collections of the Palace of the Legion of Honor, the Oakland Museum, the Ogunquit Museum of American Art, the Portland Museum of Art, and the University Art Museum at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

ACME Fine Art is located at 38 Newbury Street in Boston’s Back Bay. Gallery hours are 11:00 to 5:30 Tuesday through Saturday.

Edwin W. Dickinson

Edwin W. Dickinson 

(1891-1978)

[Edwin Dickinson]

Education
Pratt Institute Art School
National Academy of Design
Art Students League
Buffalo Fine Arts Academy and with William M. Chase and Charles Hawthorne

Selected Exhibitions
Corcoran Gallery of Art, 1916, 1928-‘57
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, 1917-’22,‘29-’31,‘44-’49,’60,’64, ’66 (solo), 2003 (solo)
National Academy of Design, 1918,’49,’82,’89-92, 2003 (solo)
Luxembourg Museum, Paris, 1919
Art Institute of Chicago, 1920
Carnegie Institute, 1921
Jeu de Pomme, Paris, 1938
Albright [Knox] Art Gallery, 1927 (solo), 2002 (solo)
Museum of Modern Art, 1938,’43,’52,’54,’61-’63, ’76
Whitney Museum of American Art, 1965 (solo),’66
Brooklyn Museum of Art
World’s Fair of New York, 1964
Everson Museum of Art, 1977
Joseph Hirshhorn Museum, 1980(solo)

Selected Collections
National Museum of American Art
Museum of Modern Art
Whitney Museum of American Art
Art Institute of Chicago
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
National Academy of Design
Philadelphia Museum of Art
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts
Baltimore Museum of Art
Corcoran Gallery of Art
Albright-Knox Art Gallery
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
Chrysler Museum of Art
Joseph Hirshhorn Museum

Biography
Edwin Dickinson (October 11, 1891–December 1, 1978) was an American painter and draftsman known for his psychologically charged self-portraits and landscapes. His art, always grounded in realism, shows connections to symbolism and surrealism. Dickinson was born and raised in upstate New York, in the Finger Lakes area; his family moved to Buffalo in 1897. The death of his mother from tuberculosis in 1903, the suicide in 1913 of his older brother, Burgess, and his father’s remarriage in 1914 to a much younger woman have all been cited as influences on the themes of his later work. Dickinson had youthful ambitions for a career in the Navy, but he failed the Navy entrance exam twice (though he later served as a radio operator during World War I). In 1911 he enrolled at the Art Students League of New York, where he studied under William Merritt Chase. In the summers of 1912 and 1913 he stayed in Provincetown, Massachusetts, where he took a class taught by Charles W. Hawthorne. After concluding his formal studies in 1913, Dickinson lived and taught in Provincetown for several years. His mature paintings can be roughly divided into two categories: The first consists of portraits, still lifes and landscapes executed quickly, often at a single sitting (the artist referred to these as premiere coups); the second is comprised of compositions of symbolic and enigmatic character, often large in size and very complex, which sometimes took many years to complete. While his palette tended towards monochrome, his landscapes painted from observation are notable for their strong evocation of light, which is usually hazy but sometimes brilliant. His paintings are often allusively autobiographical in content. His drawings in graphite are notable for their sensitivity to tonal nuance.