Artist Biography: Myron Stout

MYRON STOUT (1908-1987)

PUBLIC COLLECTIONS

Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY
Brooklyn Museum, New York
Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh
Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas, TX
De Menil Collection, Houston
Grey Art Gallery, New York University, New York
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
Museum of Modern Art, New York
The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
Seattle Art Museum, Washington
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
Portland Art Museum, Portland, ME

PRIVATE COLLECTIONS

William H. Alexander
Whitney Armstrong
Richard Brown Baker
Richard Bellamy
Charles H. Carpenter, Jr.
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Douglas III
Martha Edelheit
Linda Eisinger
Dr. and Mrs. Aaron H. Esman
Jackie Fowler
Kenneth Freed
Mr. and Mrs. B.H. Friedman
Mr. and Mrs. Gary Galkin
Agnes Gund
Susan Harris
William Hokin
Flora M. Irving
Philip Johnson
Dody Muller
Maia Muller
McCrory Corporation
Barbara Onorati
La Riviere Collection, Montreal
Louisa Sarofim
Sanford Schwartz and Carol Obedin
Roberta Smith
Tiffany Bell

SOLO EXHIBITIONS

1954- “Myron Stout Paintings” Stable Gallery, New York, April 5-24
1957- “Myron Stout: Drawings-Paintings” Hansa Gallery, New York, March 4-23
1977- “Myron Stout: Paintings and Drawings” Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston,
May 14-July 30
1980- “Myron Stout” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, February 5 – April 6
“Myron Stout Drawings” Cherrystone Gallery, Wellfleet, MA, July 26 – August 8
1990- “Myron Stout: Pathways and Epiphanies” Dia Art Foundation, Bridgehampton, NY,
July 21-October 7
1992- “Myron Stout: Landscape Drawings” Washburn Gallery, NY, April 2 – May 29
“Myron Stout” Oil & Steel Gallery, Kent Fine Art, Flynn, October-December
1994- “Myron Stout: Paintings circa 1950″ Washburn Gallery, NY, January 29-March 12
1997- “Myron Stout: Paintings” Luhring Augustine Gallery, New York, May 2-June 6
“Myron Stout” Annamarie Verna Galerie, Zurich Switzerland, May 28-July 16
“Myron Stout: The Unfinished Paintings” Washburn Gallery, NY, October 29-
November 29
1998- “Myron Stout” Inverleith House, Edinburgh, Scotland June 14 – July 26
2002- “Myron Stout: Studies for Drawings” Washburn Gallery, NY, April 4 – May 18
2005- “Myron Stout: Paintings c. 1950,” Washburn Gallery, NY March 8 – April 16
2007- “Myron Stout: Paintings and Drawings,” Washburn Gallery, NY March 8 – April 21

SELECTED GROUP EXHIBITIONS

1955- “Benefit Exhibition” Hansa Gallery, New York, December 5-24
1958- “Lily Brody, Jean Follett, Myron Stout: Drawings” Hansa Gallery, New York,
May 12-31
“Annual Exhibition: Sculpture, Paintings, Watercolors Drawings”
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, November 15, 1958-January 4, 1959
“The 1958 Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Contemporary Painting and Sculpture” Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, December 5, 1958 – February 8, 1959
1959- “Recent Acquisitions” Museum of Modern Art, New York, January 30 – April 19
“Painting Since 1945: A Collection in the Making” Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, March 18 – April 19
“100 Works on Paper: I United States” Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston,
April 3 – May 3
1960- “Modern Classicism” David Herbert Gallery, New York, February 8-27
“New Talent in the USA, 1960″ Organized by the American Federation of the Arts,
New York. Traveled in the United States, April, 1960 – June, 1961.
“Gallery Group Show: Paintings, Sculptures and Drawings” The Green Gallery, New York, December 13, 1960 – January 7, 1961
1961- “Gallery Group Show: The Green Gallery, New York, May 30 – June 25
“Jean Follett, Mark Di Suvero, Claes Oldenburg, Lucas Samaras, Myron Stout”
The Green Gallery, New York, September 19-October 14
“Purism” David Herbert Gallery, New York, October 2 – 28
1962- Geometric Abstraction in America” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York,
March 20 – May 13
“Gallery Group Show” The Green Gallery, New York, April 10 -?
1963- “Black and White” Jewish Museum, December 12, 1963 – February 5, 1964
“The Classic Spirit in Twentieth Century Art” Sidney Janis Gallery, New York, February 4 – 29
1965- “Art of the 50’s and 60’s: Selections From the Richard Brown Baker Collection.” Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, CT, April 25 – July 5
1967- “Gallery Group Show” Noah Goldowsky Gallery, New York
1968- “Plus by Minus: Today’s Half Century” Albright Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo,
March 3 – 14
1969- “Thirty-first Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting”
Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., February 1 – March 16
“Selected Sculpture and Works on Paper” Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
October – November 14
1970- “Gallery Group Show” Noah Goldowsky Gallery, New York, May
“Art on Paper 1970″ Weatherspoon Art Gallery, Greensboro,
November 15 – December 20
1973- “American Drawings 1963 – 73″ Whitney Museum of American Art, New York,
May 25 – July 22
1975- American Art Since 1945: From the Collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Traveled to Worcester Art Museum, Worcester, MA, October 20 – November 30, and elsewhere in the United States through April 17, 1977
1976- “Tenth Street Days: The Co-ops of the 1950’s” Amos Eno, 14 Sculptors, Noho, Pliades and Ward-Nasse galleries, New York, December 20, 1976 – January 7, 1977
1977- “Permanent Collection: Thirty Years of American Art 1945 – 1975″
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, January 29 – October 23
“Provincetown Painters: 1890’s – 1970’s” Everson Museum of American Art, Syracuse, New York, April 1 – June 26th. Traveled to Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, August 15 – September 5
“Cape Cod as an Art Colony” Heritage Plantation of Sandwich, MA,
April 30 – October 16
“Works on Paper: American Art 1945 – 1975″ Organized by the Washington Art Consortium, Seattle. Traveled to museums in western Washington.
1978- “20th Century American Drawings: Five Years of Acquisitions (100 American Drawings and Works on Paper)” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, July 28 – October 1
“New England Connections” Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, November, 1978 – January,
1979- “Hans Hofmann as Teacher: His Student’s Drawings” Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, January 23 – March 4
1979- “Constructivism and the Geometric Tradition: Selections from the McCrory Corporation Collection. Organized by the McCrory Corporation, New York. Traveled to Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, October 14 – November 25, and in the United States and Japan through December 21, 1984
1980- “Geometric Tradition in American Painting: 1920 – 1980″ Rosa Esman and Marilyn Pearl Galleries, New York, April 8 – May 17
“Fiftieth Anniversary Gifts” Whitney Museum of American Art, New York,
April 8 – May 17
“Hans Hofmann as Teacher: Drawings by His Students” Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, August 1 – October 12
1981- “Contemporary Americans: Museum Collection and Recent Acquisitions”
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, January 29 – April 12
“Recent Acquisitions: Drawings” Museum of Modern Art, New York, March 19 – June 2
“The New Spiritualism: Transcendent Images in Painting and Sculpture” Oscarsson Hood Gallery, New York, September 9 – 26
“Drawing Acquisitions, 1978 – 1981″ Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
September 17 – November 15
“American Paintings and Sculptures: 1955 – 1981″ Oil and Steel Gallery, New York
October 20 – December 5
1982- “The Season in Review” Marisa del Re Gallery, New York, March 2-27
“Contemporary Painting and Sculpture II: 1950 – 1981″ Oil and Steel Gallery, New York
May 15 – June 30
“Exhibition of Works by Newly Elected Members and Recipients of Honors and Awards” American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, New York,
May 18 – June 13
“Sculpture Painting Drawing III” Oil and Steel Gallery, New York, October –
December 18
“In Our Time: Houston’s Contemporary Arts Museum 1948 – 82″ Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, October 23 – January 2, 1983
“Hans Hofmann As Teacher: Drawings by Hofmann and His Students.” Organized by the American Federation of Arts, New York. Traveled in the United States and Canada
1983- “Drawing Conclusions: A Survey of American Drawings, 1958 – 1983″ Daniel Weinberg Gallery, Los Angeles, January 29 – February 26
“New York to Bennington: Paintings” Suzanne Lemberg Usdan Gallery, Bennington College, Bennington VT, March 15 – 31
“Affinities: Myron Stout, Bill Jensen, Brice Marden, Terry Winters” Hayden Gallery, Massachussets Institute of Technology, Cambridge, May 7 – June 26
“Contemporary Sculptures, Paintings, Drawings (IV) : 1956 – 1983″
Oil and Steel Gallery, New York, May 17 – June 11, September 20 – October 15
“Black and White” Margo Leavin Gallery, Los Angeles, June 25 – August 13
1983- “Subtleties” Sutton Gallery, New York, December 1983 – January 14, 1984
“I Knew it to be So!” Forrest Bess, Alfred Jensen, Myron Stout: Theory and Visionary” New York Studio School, New York, March 30 – May 2. Traveled to Center for the Arts, Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA, May 18 – June 29
“Three Artist: Leslie, Stout, di Suvero” Oil and Steel Gallery, New York
September 18 – November 3
“Ec cen tric Im age(s)” Margo Leavin Gallery, Los Angeles, October 20 – November 24
1985- “Fortissimo! Thirty Years From the Richard Brown Baker Collection of Contemporary Art” Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, March 1 – April 28.
Traveled to San Diego Museum of Art, San Diego June 29 – August 11, and
Portland Museum of Art, Portland, OR, October 1 – November 10
“Phillip Johnson: Selected Gifts” Museum of Modern Art, New York, April 10 –
October 27
“Cinquant ans de dessins Americains: 1930 – 1980″ Organized by the Menil Collection, Houston. Traveled to Ecole National Superieure des Beaux Arts, Paris, May 3 – July 13, and Stadelsches Kunstinstitut und Stadtische Galerie, Frankfurt am Main, November 28, 1985 – January 26, 1986
“An Invitational” Condeso/Lawler Gallery, New York, June 18 – January 26, 1986
1985- “American Abstract Painting: 1960 – 1980″ Margo Leavin Gallery, Los Angeles
June 18 – August 24
1986- “Carol Dunham, Paul Feely, Gary Stephan, Myron Stout, Phillip Taaffe”
Donald Young Gallery, Chicago, May 2 – 31
“Structure/Abstraction” Hill Gallery, Birmingham, MI, May 31-June 26
“Major Acquisitions Since 1980: Selected Paintings and Sculpture”
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, September 18-November 30
“Hans Hofmann and His Legacy” Lever/Myerson Gallery, New York, October 15 – December 12
1987- “Metaphor: Myron Stout, Richard Tuttle, Richard Wentworth, Win Knowlton” Kent Fine Art, New York, February 12 – March 14
“Strong Statements in Black and White” James Goodman Gallery, New York,
October 6 – 31
1987- “Lead” Hirschl and Adler Modern, New York, December 3, 1987 – January 16, 1988
1988- “Vital Signs: Organic Abstraction from the Permanent Collection”
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, April 27 – July 17
1989- “Bilderstreit: Widerspruch, Einheit und Fragment in der Kunst Seit 1990″ Rheinhallen der Kolner Messe, Cologne, April 8 – June 28 Organized by Museum Ludwig, Cologne
“A Decade of American Drawings: 1980 – 1989″ Daniel Weinberg Gallery, Los Angeles
July 15 – August 26
“Art in Place: Fifteen Years of American Acquisitions”
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, July 27-October 22
1992- “Plane Truths”, Washburn Gallery, New York, February 18-March 28
1993- “Plane Truths”, Washburn Gallery, New York, September 8-October 9
“In a Classical Vein: Works from the Permanent Collection,”
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York
1994- “Provincetown Prospects: The Works of Hans Hofmann and His Students”
Boston University Art Gallery, January 22-February 27, 1994
“Drawings from the 60s,” Pace Drawings, New York, December 2-January 7, 1995
1995- “Essence and Persuasion: The Power of Black and White,”
Anderson Gallery, Buffalo, New York, April 1-May 13
“Works on Paper,” Mathew Marks Gallery, New York
“From the Collection: Abstraction Pure & Simple,” Museum of Modern Art, New York
1996- “Texas Modern and Post-Modern,” The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
“Forrest Bess & Myron Stout, Paintings from the 50s” Galerie Daniel Blau, Munich
November 23, 1996-January 25, 1997
2003- “A Bend in the Road” Maier Museum of Art, Lynchburg, August 30 – November 30

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

Seckler, Dorothy., “Can Painting be Taught?” Artnews 50, No. 1, March, 1951, pp. 39 – 40, 63 -64.
Feinstein, Sam., “Fortnight in Review: the Unified Image.” Art Digest 28, no. 1, April 1, 1954, p. 16.
Porter, Fairfield., “Reviews and Previews: Myron Stout.” Artnews 53, no. 2, April, 1957, p. 58.
Pollet, Elizabeth., “In the Galleries: Myron Stout.” Arts Magazine 31, no. 6, March, pp. 58 – 59.
Tyler, Parker., “Reviews and Previews: Myron Stout.” Artnews 56, no. 1, March, 1957, p. 12.
Butler, Barbara., “In the Galleries: Brody, Follett, Stout.” Arts Magazine 32, no. 9, June, 1958, p. 53.
Annual Exhibition: Sculpture, Paintings, Watercolors, Drawings. Exhibition catalog, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1958
The Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Contemporary Painting and Sculpture. Exhibition catalog, Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh, 1958 Introduction by Gordon Bailey Washburn.
Painting Since 1945: A Collection in the Making. Exhibition catalog, Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, 1959 (Richard Brown Baker Collection.)
Tillim, Sidney., “What Happened to Geometry?” Arts Magazine 33, no. 9, June, 1959, pp. 38 – 44
Canaday, John., New Talent USA: Painting.” Art in America 48, no. 1, Spring, 1960, pp. 22 – 29. Includes statement by the artist, p. 58. (“New Talent Artists: Statements and Statistics, Painters,” chosen by Dorothy C. Miller).
Sabbath, Lawrence., “Paul Lariviere.” Canadian Art 18, no. 3, May – June (special issue on collecting), pp. 170 – 73
Purism. Exhibition catalog, David Herbert Gallery, New York, 1961. Essay by Georgine Oeri.
Seuphor, Michel. Abstract Painting: Fifty Years of Accomplishment, from Kandinsky to the Present. New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1962.
Geometric Abstraction in America. Exhibition catalog, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1962. Essay by John Gordon.
Kaprow, Allan. “Impurity.” Artnews 61, no. 9, January, 1963, pp. 30 – 33, 52 – 55.
Black and White. Exhibition catalog, Jewish Museum, New York, 1963. Introduction by Ben Heller.
Sandler, Irving., “In the Art Galleries.” New York Post, December 29, 1963, magazine, p. 14l.
The Classic Spirit in Twentieth Century Art. Exhibition catalog, Sidney Janis Gallery, New York, 1964
American Drawings. Exhibition catalog, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1964. Essay by Lawrence Alloway.
Judd, Donald., “In the Galleries: American Drawings.” Arts Magazine 39, no. 2, November, 1965, p. 59
Art of the 50’s and 60’s: Selections from the Richard Brown Baker Collection. Exhibition catalog, Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, CT., 1965. Essay by Richard Brown Baker.
Plus by Minus: Today’s Half Century. Exhibition catalog, Albright Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, 1968. Essay by Douglas MacAgy.
Thirty-first Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting. Exhibition catalog, Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 1968.
Gold, Barbara., “Corcoran Biennial: New Sensibility in Washington.” Arts Magazine 43, no. 6, April, 1969, pp. 28 -31.
Selected Sculpture and Works on Paper. Exhibition catalog, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 1969. Introduction by Thomas M. Messer.
Acconci, Vito., “Reviews and Previews: John Chamberlain, Burgoyne Diller, Mark di Suvero, Myron Stout.” Artnews 68, no. 9, January, 1970, p. 12.
American Drawings 1963 – 1973. Exhibition catalog, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1973. Essay by Elke M. Solomon.
Borden, Lizzie., “Art Economics and the Whitney Drawing Show.” Artforum 12, no. 2, October, 1973, pp. 85 – 88.
Schwartz, Sanford., “Myron Stout.” Artforum 13, no 7, March, 1975, pp. 38 – 43.
American Art Since 1945: From the Collection of the Museum of Modern Art. Exhibition catalog, Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1975. Essay by Alicia Legg
“The Talk of the Town: Ambassador.” New Yorker, November 10, 1975, p. 38.
Friedman, B.H., “Too Little Attention: Art Chronicle.” New Boston Review 2, no. 3, Winter/January, 1977, p. 17
Provincetown Painters: 1890’s – 1970’s. Exhibition catalog, Everson Museum of Art, Syracuse, NY., 1977. Essays by Ronald A. Kuchta and Dorothy Gees Seckler.
Cape Cod as an Art Colony. Exhibition catalog, Heritage Plantation of Sandwich, MA., 1977. Introduction by H. R. Bradley Smith; essay by April Kingsley in collaboration with Fritz Bultman.
Ennis, Michael., “Review: Art.” Texas Monthly 5. no. 8, August, 1977, pp. 110, 112.
Tenth Street Days: The Co-ops of the 50’s. Exhibition catalog, Education and Art Service, Inc., New York, 1977. Introduction by Dore Ashton; essay by Joellen Bard.
Works on Paper: American Art 1945 – 1975. Exhibition catalog, The Washington Arts Consortium, Seattle, 1977.
Sandler, Irving., The New York School: The Painters and Sculptors of the Fifties. New York: Harper and Row, 1978.
Twentieth Century American Drawings: Five Years of Acquisitions. Exhibition catalog, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1978. Essay by Paul Cummings.
Days Lumberyard Studios: Provincetown 1914 – 1971. Exhibition catalog, Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, 1978. Essay by Ben Brooks.
Masheck, Joseph. “Pictures of Art.” Artforum 17, no. 9, May, 1979, pp. 26 – 37.
Maartens, Katherine., Myron Stout. Unpublished M.A. Thesis, Hunter College, New York, 1979 (Based on a Series of Taped Interviews).
Constructivism and the Geometric Tradition: Selections from the McCrory Corporation Collection. New York, 1979. Essay by Willy Rotzler.
Bell, Tiffany., “Myron Stout’s Complexity in Simplicity.” Artforum 18, no. 5, January, pp. 47 – 51.
Myron Stout. Exhibition catalog, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1980. Introduction by B.H. Friedman; essay by Sanford Schwartz; excerpts from the artist’s journals.
Rose, Barbara., “Talking About… Art: Big ‘Little Master.'” Vogue, February, 1980, p. 68.
Kramer, Hilton., “Art: Myron Stout Ushered into Limelight.” New York Times, February 8, 1980, p. C26.
Zimmer, William., “Myron Stout: The Whitney Museum.” Soho Weekly News, February 13, 1980, p. 25.
Rothschild, Judith., “Myron Stout at Whitney.” Art World 4, no. 6, February 15/March 15,1980, pp. 1, 4.
Marzorati, Gerald., “Artful Dodger.” Soho Weekly News, February 20, 1980, p. 22.
Rickey, Carrie., Uptown: Myron Stout.” Village Voice, February 25, p. 69.
Perl, Jed., “On Myron Stout.” Art in America 68, no. 3, March, 1980, pp. 107 – 111.
Ashbery, John., “Stylish Stouts.” New York Magazine, March 3, 1980, pp. 97 – 98.
Shuebrook, Ron., “Myron Stout.” Arts Magazine 54, no. 8, April, 1980, p. 9.
Hans Hofmann as Teacher: Drawings by His Students. Exhibition catalog, Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, 1980. Essays by Fritz Bultman and Cynthia Goodman.
The New Spiritualism: Transcendent Images in Painting and Sculpture. Exhibition catalog, Oscarsson Hood Gallery, New York, 1981. Introduction by April Kingsley.
Drawing Acquisitions, 1978 – 1981. Exhibition catalog, Whitney Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1981. Essay by Paul Cummings.
Schwartz, Sanford. The Art Presence. New York, Horizon Press, 1982.
Raynor, Vivien., “Contemporary Paintings and Sculpture II: Oil and Steel.” New York Times, June 25, 1982, p. C21.
In Our Times: Houston’s Contemporary Art’s Museum 1948 – 1982, Exhibition catalog, Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, 1982. Essay by Cheryl A. Brutvan.
Glueck, Grace. “The Artists’ Artists.” Artnews 81, no. 9, November, 1982, pp. 90 – 100.
New York to Bennington: Paintings. Exhibition catalog. Suzanne Lemberg Usdan Gallery, Bennington College, Bennington, VT, 1983. Essay by Emily Sorkin.
Affinities: Myron Stout, Bill Jensen, Brice Marden, and Terry Winters. Exhibition catalog, Hayden Gallery, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, 1983. Essay by Kathy Halbreich.
Baker, Kenneth. “Art/The Elective Affinities: Taking Stock of Anti-Expressionism.” Boston Phoenix, June 21, sec. 3, p. 5.
Subtleties, 1983. Exhibition catalog, Sutton Gallery, New York. Essay by Jeffrey Wechsler.
Raynor, Vivien., “Art: A Modest Survey Spotlighting ‘Subtleties’.” New York Times, December 30, 1983, p. C20.
I Knew it to be So!” Forrest Bess, Alfred Jensen, Myron Stout: Theory and the Visionary. Exhibition catalog, New York Studio School, New York, 1984. Traveled to Center for the Arts, Muhlenberg College, Allentown, PA. Essays by John Yau, David Reed, Lawrence Luhring, and Thomas Hudspeth.
Brenson, Michael., “Three Artists: Leslie, Stout, di Suvero: Oil and Steel.” New York Times, May 25, 1984, p. C21.
Fortissimo! Thirty Years from the Richard Brown Baker Collection of Contemporary Art. Exhibition catalog, Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, 1985. Essay by Richard Brown Baker.
Cinquante ans de dessins Americains: 1930 – 1980. Exhibition catalog, Menil Foundation, Houston, 1985. Introduction by Walter Hopps; catalog by Walter Hopps and Neil Printz.
Raynor, Vivien., “An Invitational: Condeso/Lawler Gallery.” New York Times, July 26, 1985, p. C22.
Stout, Myron., “Selections from the Journal of Myron Stout.” New Observations, 1985, no. 37, pp. 13 – 21. Selected by Tiffany Bell.
Stout, Myron. “Journal Excerpts, 1950 – 54.” Shankpainter 26, Spring, 1986, pp. 49 -52.
Hans Hofmann and His Legacy. Exhibition catalog, Lever/Myerson Gallery, New York, 1986. Essay by Cynthia Goodmman.
Painting and Sculpture Acquisitions, 1973 – 1986. Catalog, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 1986. Essay by Patterson Sims.
Metaphor: Myron Stout, Richard Tuttle, Richard Wentworth, Win Knowlton. Exhibition catalog, Kent Fine Art, New York, 1987. Introduction by Susan Harris.
Stout, Myron. “Myron Stout: Selections from the Artist’s Journals.” Provincetown Arts 3, no. 1, Summer, 1987, pp. 80 – 82.
Brenson, Michael., “Myron Stout, Abstract Artist and Minimalist is Dead at 79.” New York Times, August 8, 1987 p. 50.
Lead, Exhibition catalog, Hirschl and Adler Modern, New York, 1987. Introduction by Klaus Kertess.
Smith, Roberta., “‘Lead': Hirschl and Adler Modern.” New York Times, January 15, 1988, p. C24.
Bomb, no. 22, Winter, 1988, pp. 38 – 39, ill.
Vital Signs: Organic Constructions from the Permanent Collection. Exhibition catalog, Whitney Museum of American Art., New York, 1988. Essay by Lisa Phillips.
Bilderstreit: Widerspruch, Einheit und Fragment in der Kunst Seit 1960. Exhibition catalog, Whitney
Museum of American Art, New York, 1989. Essays by Tom Armstrong and Susan C. Larsen.
Russell, John., “One and a Half Decades of Whitney Acquisitions.” New York Times, July 28, 1989. p. C22.
Russell, John., “Adding Up Costs of Changes at the Top.” New York Times, March 18, 1990, sec. 2, pp. 37 – 39.
Myron Stout: Pathways and Epiphanies. Exhibition catalog, Dia Art Foundation, New York, 1990. Introduction and essay by Henry Geldzahler.
Braff, Phyllis., “Emotional Skies and Forms.” New York Times, August 5, 1990, sec. 12, p. L.I. 13.
Myron Stout. Exhibition catalog, Inverleith House, Edinburgh, Scotland, 1992

Rose Basile

Rose Basile is originally from Newark, NJ. College days were at Boston University for her undergraduate degree and she later returned to Boston University on a fellowship for her Masters in Education and Psychology. Upon graduation she taught in the public schools of Rhode Island, the Newton school system and also at Rhode Island College in Providence.

After 20 years of teaching she moved to Chatham in the late 1910’s where she owned and managed her own rental properties. Art has always been important and a strong influence in her life, since three generations of women were in the art world: in fabric design, art education and – her favorite Aunt Jennie – a New Jersey folk artist. Rose started watercolor painting in her high school days and from then on always attended one or two workshops a year. The most important step was taken when she attended evening classes at the Boston Museum School. At the same time, she was teaching in the Newton school system and later attended a summer art workshop at Haystack, in Maine.

In 1999 Rose moved to Provincetown and began studying art, immersing herself in the local art world and taking oil painting classes at the Provincetown Art Association & Museum (PAAM).

JIM FORSBERG: THE EARLY YEARS

The work of the noted 20th century abstract artist Jim Forsberg (1919-1991) will be featured in a solo exhibition of his oil paintings, works on paper, and graphic relief printing blocks at ACME Fine Art in Boston. The exhibition will open with a reception from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. on Thursday evening 23 February 2006, and will be on view through 25 March.

Jim Forsberg was an art student during the heyday of abstract expressionism in the 1940s. Forsberg’s early training was with Will Barnet and Vaclav Vytlacil at the Art Students League, and with Hans Hofmann at Hofmann’s School of Fine Art in New York and Provincetown. Forsberg was an accomplished printmaker and painter whose approach steadfastly adhered to the modernist principles he adopted during his formative years. Jim Forsberg’s work has been widely exhibited ever since his debut in New York in the 1940s. Today paintings and/or prints by Jim Forsberg are in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, the National Gallery of Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Chrysler Museum, the Everson Museum, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

For the upcoming ACME Fine Art exhibition, gallery director David Cowan has assembled a fine cross-section of work that dates from the mid-1940s through the 1950s. This was a particularly creative and fertile time for Forsberg. While the influences of his esteemed teachers can -upon careful examination- be detected, Forsberg’s independent artistic temperament is always predominant. The work from this period explores notions of balance and counterbalance, formal relationships between the part and the whole, and the complex physical forces that come into play between forms in space.

ACME Fine Art is located at 38 Newbury Street in Boston’s Back Bay. Gallery Hours are 11:00 to 5:30 Tuesday through Saturday. The gallery is now also open on the First Friday of every month until 7:00 p.m. For further information please contact the gallery at 617.585.9551, or info@acmefineart.com.

GEORGE MCNEIL: At Mid-Century

12 January – 18 February, 2006

For ACME Fine Art’s first exhibition of 2006, gallery Director David Cowan has assembled an extraordinary collection of mid-century paintings by one of America’s original action painters, George McNeil. The exhibition will open on Thursday 12 January 2006 with a reception for 6 to 8 in the evening, and it will feature more than a dozen vintage oil paintings by McNeil, who is generally regarded as one of the 20th Century”s top expressionist painters.

McNeil’s lengthy and illustrious career as an artist and educator spanned more than sixty years. Remarkably, his work was consistently avant-garde throughout his career. Always an expressionist, McNeil’s early work picked up where his studies with Jan Matulka, Vaclav Vytlacil, and Hans Hofmann in the late 1920s and early1930s left off. His work evolved from the post-cubist abstract expressionism of the late 1930s through the figural expressionism of late 1960s and 70s to emerge as full-blown neo-expressionism from the 1980s forward. Recent museum and gallery exhibitions of McNeil’s work have focussed on the dramatic late paintings for which he is well known; however, ACME Fine Art’s January exhibition will feature a fine and rare group of McNeil’s abstract expressionist paintings that were created between 1949 and 1969.

George McNeil is considered a first generation New York School artist. He was present for and a first hand participant in the birth of abstract expressionism, but even prior to that McNeil had earned a place in American art history of the twentieth century. In 1936 McNeil, and a small group of modern artists that included Ibram Lassaw, and Ilya Bolotowsky founded the American Abstract Artists group. Later in the same decade McNeil was one of only a handful of non-objective painters to be included in the New York World’s Fair Exhibition of 1939. Along with Franz Kline, Willem DeKooning, and Giorgio Cavallon, McNeil was one of the original stable of artists who showed their work with Charles Egan at his ground-breaking New York gallery in the late 1940s and early 1950s. Most of the paintings assembled for ACME Fine Art’s current exhibition have not been exhibited since they were originally shown as contemporary at the Egan, Poindexter, and Howard Wise Galleries in New York in the 1950s and 1960s. Each painting selected for the exhibition constitutes abstract expressionism in its purest form. Each is directly and spontaneously expressed using color and texture in ways that are characteristic only to George McNeil.

ACME Fine Art’s exhibition GEORGE MCNEIL: At Mid-Century will run through 18 February 2006. Gallery hours are 11 to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Exhibition catalogues are available through the gallery. ACME Fine Art is located at 38 Newbury Street in Boston’s Back Bay. For further information please contact the gallery at 617.585.9551, or info@acmefineart.com.

PIONEERS OF MODERNISM

17 November – 23 December, 2005

ACME Fine Art and Design’s next gallery event will be the opening of a group exhibition titled PIONEERS OF MODERNISM: Agnes Weinrich, Grace Martin Taylor, & Blanche Lazzell. The exhibition will feature more than twenty works by these highly regarded modern artists. The show will open with a reception on Thursday 17 November 2005 from six to eight o’clock, and will run through Friday 23 December 2005.

Weinrich, Taylor, and Lazzell were important players in the avant-garde art scene that flourished in Provincetown Massachusetts early in the last century. Each of these well-trained and highly educated women was skilled in drawing and painting, and they were among the earliest advocates/practitioners of white line wood-block (“Provincetown”) print-making. They shared a mutual interest in abstraction that was often derived from cubism, and these formal characteristics are consistently evident in their work regardless of medium. ACME Fine Art’s exhibition will include important oil paintings, drawings, watercolors, white line wood block prints, and some rarely seen wood blocks that were hand-carved by the artists as a part of their print-making process.

ACME Fine Art’s PIONEERS OF MODERNISM will be viewable on this site and at the gallery located at 38 Newbury Street in Boston. Gallery hours are from 11:00 to 5:30 Tuesday though Saturday. Further information can be obtained by contacting the gallery at info@acmefineart.com or calling 617.585.9551.

LILLIAN ORLOWSKY: IN RETROSPECT

14 October – 12 November, 2005

ACME Fine Art’s solo exhibitions of paintings by Lillian Orlowsky during the winter of 2002 and the autumn of 2003 focused on the artist’s remarkable oil paintings from the 1940s and 1950s. Following Orlowsky’s passing in August of last year, gallery director David Cowan began planning a memorial exhibition, and immediately concluded that such an exhibition should visually demonstrate the arc of this colorful and talented artist’s lengthy career. The resulting exhibition – which is called Lillian Orlowsky In Retrospect – will therefore include work in a variety of media, and work that dates from as early as 1937 and from as late as 1995. The exhibition will open with a reception on Friday 14 October from 6 to 8 in the evening.

The exhibition will include several early figure drawings from Orlowsky’s days attending the Hans Hofmann Schools in both New York and Provincetown, a fine selection of skillfully conceived oil paintings from the early 1940s through the 1960s, and an excellent group of paintings and drawings on paper that were done in the highly refined, concise idiom that characterized her work from the 1970s until her death. During the late 1940s and early 1950s as abstract expressionism was just beginning to emerge as America’s premier contribution to modernism, Orlowsky supported herself in part by designing textiles, and an excellent selection of her textile designs will also be included in the show. What holds this seemingly disparate body of work together is the amazingly consistent point of view of the artist. The work demonstrates growth and maturation, yet Orlowsky’s completely modern and personal abstract expressionist spirit is imbued in all of it regardless of period.

Lillian Orlowsky: In Retrospect will be on view from 14 October to 12 November 2005 at ACME Fine Art and Design, 38 Newbury Street, Boston, MA, 02116. The gallery is open from 11:00 to 5:30 Tuesday through Saturday, and by appointment.

For further information please contact the gallery at 617 585 9551 or at info@acmefineart.com.

KENNETH STUBBS: STILL LIFE PAINTINGS

8 September – 8 October, 2005

ACME Fine Art’s autumn season will open with a retrospective exhibition of still life paintings by the noted 20th century modern artist Kenneth Stubbs. The exhibition will be comprised of a fine group of paintings – in a variety of media – that date from between 1934 and 1965. The still life as a genre was an important subject for Stubbs throughout his career, and the paintings selected by gallery director David Cowan for this exhibition demonstrate the lasting vitality of the still life as a subject.

Kenneth Stubbs was a gifted artist and teacher who had an unwavering allegiance to modernism. In the early 1930s he studied in Provincetown with E. Ambose Webster, who is considered by many to be Provincetown’s first important modernist. Webster’s Summer Art School was the first of numerous art schools on Cape Cod to emphasize a modern point of view. Stubbs was one of Webster’s most important students, and Webster became to Stubbs a mentor, an inspiration, and a colleague. Like his mentor, Stubbs was dedicated to the dissemination of modern ideas through his artwork and teaching. He taught for many years at the Corcoran School of Art in Washington D.C., and the Corcoran also became an important venue for the exhibition of his work.

In recent years the Cape Cod Museum of Art and the Provincetown Art Association and Museum have mounted retrospective exhibitions of paintings and drawings by Kenneth Stubbs. ACME Fine Art has represented the artist’s estate since 2002, and in 2003 an exhibition of landscapes titled Shorescapes, was the gallery’s first solo exhibition of Stubbs’ work. It was one of the gallery’s most successful shows to date, drawing an enormously positive response from fans of more traditional forms of expression and from dyed in the wool modernists alike.

Stubbs had a fundamentally clear and consistent artistic vision; yet he, unlike many artists of his generation – was able to grow artistically without ever needing to negate or reject what had gone before. The paintings that comprise the basis for this exhibition were selected to demonstrate the remarkable arc of Stubbs’ growth as an artist. Many of the paintings have not been exhibited since they were contemporary; nonetheless, each has a brilliantly fresh look that is evocative of the best of the period from which they come without losing contemporary appeal. Through his persistent use of universal themes in combination with his rigorous intellectual and artistic point of view, Kennth Stubbs was able to communicate a view of the world that is lasting, and continues to be relevant.

ACME Fine Art’s exhibition of still life paintings by Kenneth Stubbs will open with a reception at the gallery from 6 to 8 o’clock on Thursday evening 8 September 2005. The exhibition will run through 8 October 2005. A catalogue that includes illustrations of twelve paintings from the exhibition and an essay by Gail R Scott are available through the gallery. ACME Fine Art and Design is located at 38 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts, 02116.

For further information please contact the gallery at 617 585 9551 or at info@acmefineart.com.

SUMMER SALON 2005

16 June – 13 August, 2005

Twentieth century American painting from New England’s summer art colonies will be the focus of ACME Fine Art’s summer-long exhibition. The salon style show will open on the16th June and will run through 13 August 2005.

More than thirty artists and over forty works will be included in the exhibition that will present a stylistic cross section of modern art in America. Coastal New England art colonies such as Monhegan Island and Cranberry Island in Maine, and Westport and Provincetown in Massachusetts are the sources for much of the artwork that will comprise the exhibition, and the New England coastline will be the loosely interpreted theme. Artwork from the early twentieth century will include paintings by Blanche Lazzell, Oliver Chaffee, Abraham Walkowitz, Agnes Weinrich, T. Lux Feininger, Jo Cain, John Von Wicht, Vaclav Vytlacil, and Howard Gibbs. Mid-century artists whose work will be represented include: Hans Hofmann, Karl Knaths, Peter Busa, John Grillo, Herman Maril, Philip Malicoat, George McNeil, Nanno de Groot, Kenneth Stubbs, Grace Martin Taylor, Jim Forsberg, Dorothy Eisner, William Freed, Leo Manso, Lillian Orlowsky, and Michael Loew among others. ACME will also feature a fine selection of paintings by late twentieth century and contemporary artists such as Robert Beauchamp, Noa Hall, Rose Basile, Tony Vevers, and Myrna Harrison.

ACME Fine Art and Design is located at 38 Newbury Street, Boston, Massachusetts, 02116. Summer Hours are 11:00 to 5:00 Tuesday through Saturday, and other times by appointment.

For further information please contact the gallery at 617 585 9551 or at info@acmefineart.com.

Artwork from the Collection of William Freed and Lillian Orlowsky

5 May – 11 June, 2005

Lillian Orlowsky and William Freed first became acquainted in 1932 when both artists attended the Educational Alliance in New York. During the mid-1930s they were employed by the Federal Works Project Administration -Orlowsky as a painter in the easel division, and Freed in the mural Division. It was in 1937 that Orlowsky happened to encounter Freed as they waited in line to receive their W.P.A. paychecks. Orlowsky had recently begun taking classes with the controversial teacher Hans Hofmann at his new school in Manhattan, and she enthusiastically recommended that Freed join her in class. Shortly thereafter he did. Thus, Freed and Orlowsky began a personal and professional relationship –partnership if you will- that lasted almost fifty years.

The pair was associated with Hofmann and his schools in New York and Provincetown during the prewar heyday of the abstract expressionist movement. The community of avant-garde artists in New York and in Provincetown of which they were a part became a vital component of their artistic existence. In her later years Orlowsky often spoke eloquently about the collegial atmosphere of the W.P.A. and of the Hofmann School early years and the importance of this collegiality in her development as an artist. Orlowsky and Freed were artists to the core. Their lives were almost totally given over to their artistic pursuits, in Freed’s case for almost fifty years, and in Orlowsky’s almost seventy. They married in 1942, and in the years that followed, Orlowsky and Freed acquired by trade, barter, and/ or gift a sizable group of artworks created by their colleagues and friends. Some of these artists became successful -even famous. Others, are today less well known; nonetheless, Olrowsky and Freed, through the course of their lengthy careers, did assemble a substantial and important group of paintings by their colleagues and friends.

During the later years of her life Orlowsky donated a number of paintings from their collection to several museums, the Cape Museum of Fine Arts, the Provincetown Art Association and Museum, and the Rose Museum at Brandeis University among others. The remaining paintings along with a selection of paintings and drawings by Orlowsky and Freed form the body of the ACME Fine Art exhibition titled: Artwork from the Collection of William Freed and Lillian Orlowsky. This disparate group of modern paintings and drawings were certainly among Orlowsky and Freed’s most cherished possessions. They represent a remarkable selection of mid-century American modern art by some of the twentieth century’s most important artists. Highlights of the exhibition will be six mid-century paintings by Hans Hofmann, canvases by James Gahagan and Alice Hodges, and a fine group of works on paper by George McNeil, Fritz Bultman, and Robert DeNiro Sr.

ACME Fine Art’s catalogued exhibition Artwork from the Collection of William Freed and Lillian Orlowsky will open with a reception on Thursday 5 May 2005, from six to eight p.m. and will run through 11 June 2005. Catalogues are available through the gallery. The exhibition is being mounted in honor of Lillian Orlowsky, who passed away in August of 2004. All of the work in the catalogue is being offered for sale for the first time as a part of this exhibition.

ACME Fine Art is located at 38 Newbury Street in Boston’s Back Bay. For further information please contact the gallery at 617 585 9551 or at info@acmefineart.com.

DOROTHY EISNER, Late Expressionist Paintings

24 March – 30 April, 2005

ACME Fine Art’s Spring season will open with an exhibition vibrantly colorful canvases painted by Dorothy Eisner. The exhibition will commence with a reception between 6:00 and 8:00 p.m. on Thursday 24 March 2005, and will run through 30 April 2005.

Dorothy Eisner’s painting career spanned more than seven decades. It began in the teens when she won several children’s drawing contests. Then, as a teenager she attended the “Arts High School” (Ethical Cultural High School) in New York City. In 1924 Eisner began her studies at the Art Students League where she studied with Boardman Robinson and Kenneth Hayes Miller. In the late 1920s Eisner took three lengthy trips to France, studying briefly at the Academie de la Grand Chaumiere in Paris. The influence of Matisse and Cezanne in her work is evident from this period forward.

Long active in avant-garde art circles in Cranberry Island, Maine, and New York City, Eisner served on the Board of the Society of Independent Artists in the 1930s, having been nominated by John Sloan. In 1941, along with Ilya Bolotowsky, Susie Frelinghuysen, G.L.K. Morris, Adolph Gottlieb, and Mark Rothko she co-founded the Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors. Then, in the 1950s Eisner studied with Jack Tworkov, and her work became both more expressive and abstract as a result of Tworkov’s influence. While these influences may be important, they in no way diminish the strength of Eisner’s unique artistic vision.

Dorothy Eisner’s work has been exhibited at the Salons of America, the Society of Independent Artists, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, the National Association of Women Painters and Sculptors, the New York World’s Fair (1939), the New York Society of Women Artists, the Federation of Modern Painters and Sculptors, and the Brooklyn Museum. The most recent museum exhibition of her work occurred in 1992, when the Farnsworth Art Museum in Rockland Maine mounted a solo exhibition titled: Dorothy Eisner: Paintings and Collages.

For ACME Fine Art’s first solo exhibition of paintings by Dorothy Eisner gallery director David Cowan has elected to focus on work from the 1970s and 1980s. This was a lively and productive period for the artist. The resultant canvases are boldly expressed and brilliantly colorful. They reveal Eisner’s great confidence with the medium and express an infectious joi-de-vivre that delights the eye.

ACME Fine Art is located at 38 Newbury Street in Boston’s Back Bay.. Gallery hours are 11:00 to 5:30 Tuesday through Saturday. For further information please contact the gallery at 617 585 9551 or at info@acmefineart.com.