Jay Milder

Jay Milder
(1934-)

Selected Exhibitions:

2005
Celebration, Lohin Geduld Gallery, New York, NY

2004
Lohin Geduld Gallery, New York, NY (solo)

2003
Museum of Modern Art, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil (solo)
Selections, Lohin Geduld Gallery, New York, NY

2001
Andre Zarre Gallery, New York, NY (solo) 2000
Reina Sofia Museum, Madrid, Spain

1999
Museum of Fine Arts, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (solo)
Hugo Pagano Gallery, New York, NY

1998
Elizabeth Harris Gallery, New York, NY

1997
Retrospective show, Hugo Pagano Gallery, New York, NY (solo)

1996
Horace Richter Gallery, Tel Aviv, Israel (solo)

1995
Kathleen Ross Gallery Soho, New York, NY

1994
Alitash Kebede Gallery, Los Angelos, CA (solo)

1993
Greenville Museum, Greenville, SC

1992
Retrospective 1958-92, tour (solo)

1991
Private Stories, Alitash Kebede Fine Art, Los Angeles, CA

1990
Horace Richter Gallery, Jaffa, Israel
The Expanding Figurative Imagination, Anita Shapolsky Gallery, New York, NY

1988
Girgis & Klym Gallery, Fitzroy, Australia (solo)
Eleonore Austerer Fine Art, San Mateo, CA (solo)

1987 “
Jay Milder–Messiah on the IND”, tour

1986
Sid Deutsch Gallery, New York, NY (solo)
Richard Green Gallery, New York, NY (solo)
Gallery Four, Charlotte, VA (solo)

Biography:

Born in Omaha, Nebraska, he became a noted abstract painter in the New York art scene from 1958 when he, Bob Thompson, and Red Grooms founded City Gallery. They were all influenced by Abstract Expressionism, but closer to Willem De Kooning than Jackson Pollock because all three were committed to figurative work.

As a child he was influenced by both the Hasidic mysticism of his ancestors and by the black dominated jazz night clubs he frequented in North Omaha. In the early 1950s he studied in Paris with Ossip Zadkine and Andre Lhote but was most influenced by the abstract work of Chaim Soutine, who had died a decade earlier.

In the 1960s, Milder found himself increasingly an outsider because he had little interest in prevalent styles, Minimalism and Pop Art. He and others formed a group the called Rhino Horn, a loose association of figurative artists who painted in Expressionist style. In the 1970s, with the return of figurative painting in public acceptance, he felt more in the mainstream.

Jack Hall

Jack Hall
(1913-2003)

jackhall

John “Jack” Hughes Hall was born in 1916 into a well-to-do family on Long Island. He graduated from Princeton University in 1935. Between ‘35 and ‘46 he traveled, wrote for newspapers and served in the army.
He first came to Wellfleet in the late ‘30s, taking to the landscape immediately which he described as ‘manageable’. He bought 180 acres and a very old farm compound on Bound Brook Island for $3,500 from Katie Dos Passos, wife of the writer John Dos Passos.
Jack Hall and his close friends, Jack Phillips and Hayden Walling, were the three self-taught, designer/builders in Wellfleet who created a welcoming environment for the European Modernists who arrived in the mid ‘40s. In 1946, Hall started his own design build practice in Wellfleet which he continued intermittently until he retired. Projects included the Peter’s Hill Restaurant building, the Hatch Cottage, and many studios, renovations and additions.
Beginning in 1956, he worked for a number of firms in New York City including Nardin and Radoczy, Tom Lee Ltd., Hughes & Hood and George Nelson and Company.
His study of industrial design led to work on a number of major traveling exhibitions for the US Information Service including Graphics USA in ’63 with Ivan Chermayeff (son of Serge Chermayeff). While with Hughes and Hood he designed many showrooms in the United States and Europe for the Fieldcrest Mills Company.
In 1959 he spent four months in Moscow helping to assemble ‘The Jungle Gym,’ George Nelson’s contribution to the American National Exhibition. He worked with Charles and Ray Eames on a light fixture in 1964 and designed a café table for the Museum of Modern Art’s restaurant.
Hall taught at Parsons School of Design’s Industrial Design Department in 1957-58 and had a simu-ltaneous private architectural practice in New York, executing many townhouse renovations (including one for his friends, Serge and Barbara Chermayeff).
Although when Hall first came to Wellfleet he had an old Rolls Royce and was sometimes referred to as the ‘Squire of Bound Brook,’ he become a beloved fixture in town, especially after moving there full time in the early ‘70s.
He was a serious, lifelong, painter and writer. Hall’s last wife, Marty, was close to Connie Breuer and often would sing at parties while Connie accompanied on jazz piano. Jack Hall died in the winter of 2003 in Wellfleet.

Resia Schor

Resia Schor
(1910-2006)

Chronology
1910: Resia Schor is born Resia Ajnsztajn (or Ainstein) in Lublin, Poland to Lejbe (Arie) Ajnsztajn and Fajga-Brucha (nee Weisman).

1928: Resia and her family move to Warsaw in part so that she can pursue art studies preparatory to applying to the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts.

1930: Resia meets Ilya Schor when she applies to and is enrolled at the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts.

1938: After the death of her father, Resia leaves her mother and two brothers, Solomon and Moses, in Warsaw and joins Ilya in Paris in August. Although unmarried, they live together in a top floor garret at 10 Rue Carlot in the Marais, a Jewish quarter of Paris. Resia enrolls in art history courses at the École du Louvre.

1938: As aliens in France, Resia and Ilya cannot get married in a civil ceremony but they marry in a religious ceremony, not legally recognized by French law. After Germany’s invasion of Poland in September, they are granted resident status and they marry in a civil ceremony in Paris.

1938: At Resia’s insistence, the couple flees to Paris in late May, just ahead of advancing German troops. They head towards Bordeaux to reunite with friends working for the Joint Distribution Committee who had evacuated Paris earlier. Resia and Ilya are the only survivors of the group of about eleven friends, all Polish Jews, who fled Paris together. They settle in Marseilles to wait for immigration visas to America.

1941: Resia and Ilya arrive in New York City via Lisbon, December 3. They settle on the Upper West Side of Manhattan.

1941-1943: Ilya works on jewelry and paintings.

1944: October 10, daughter Naomi is born in New York City.

1947: December 29, Resia and Ilya Schor become Naturalized Citizens of the United States.

1950: June 1, Daughter Mira is born in New York City.

1957: After summers spent in Sayville, NY, Rockport, MA, and Woodstock, NY, the Schors spend their first summer in Provincetown, MA.

1958: Resia Schor has a one-person exhibition, Painting, under the name Resia Ain at The Workshop Gallery, New York City. The Schors return to Europe for the first time since World War II and spend the summer with Mira and Naomi in Paris and travel to Italy.

1960: Resia’s husband, Ilya, dies in New York, June 7, at 57. She participates in a group benefit exhibition held in Provincetown in support of CORE Freedom Fighters.

1962: Resia begins to work with Ilya’s tools and materials.

1969: Resia Schor, Jewelry, The Benson Gallery, Bridgehampton, NY. Resia Schor, group exhibitions: National Jewelry Exhibition by Outstanding Contemporary American Artist-Craftsmen, Lawrence University, Appleton, WI; First Survey of Contemporary American Crafts, The University Art Museum, The University of Texas, Austin; Crafts Invitational, The Gallery of the Maryland Institute, Baltimore, MD. Resia purchases a summer home in Provincetown, MA.

1973: Resia Schor, Sculptured Jewelry, Arras Gallery, New York.

1976: Resia Schor, Sculptured Jewelry, Arras Gallery, New York.

1977: Resia Schor, group exhibitions: The Women’s Art Symposium, Turman Gallery, Indiana State University; Made in Metal, The Junior Art Gallery, Louisville, KY.

1988: Resia Schor, exhibition of sculpture and jewelry, East End Gallery, Provincetown, MA.

1989: Resia Schor, exhibition East End Gallery, Provincetown, MA.

1990: Resia Schor, exhibition East End Gallery, Provincetown, MA.

2000: One-person exhibition Mezuzot by Resia Schor opens at Yeshiva University Museum, New York, on December 5, Resia’s 90th birthday.

2001: Naomi Schor dies of a cerebral hemorrhage December 2, at 58, in New Haven, CT. Her funeral is held in Providence, RI on December 5, Resia’s 91st birthday.

2002: Family, group exhibition including work by Resia, Ilya, and Mira Schor, Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, CT.

2003: Group exhibition with Mira Schor, My Mother Is and Artist, the educational Alliance, curated by Sheila Pepe. Mira Schor, The Tale of the Goldsmith’s Floor, is produced for the 2003 Brown University and differencesConfrence, “The Lure of the Detail,” in honor of Naomi Schor, and also shown at the Fine Arts Work Center and at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum, August 2003.

2006: Resia dies at her home in New York City, November 27. She is buried in Provincetown, December 4.

2008: Works by Resia, Ilya, and Mira Schor included in The Studio Show, Provincetown Art Association and Museum; Ilya Schor is reburied with Resia in Provincetown.

Selected Collections
The Jerusalem Great Synagogue, Jacob and Belle Rosenbaum Mezuzah Collection
Private Collections

Biography
Resia Schor was born in Lublin, Poland, December 5, 1910 and died in New York City, November 27, 2006. She was a Polish-born artist who lived and worked in New York City from 1941 until her death in 2006.

She studied painting at the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw. There she met the painter and sculptor Ilya Schor; they were married in Paris at the outbreak of the Second World War. In 1941 they came to the United States and settled in New York City. Both Schors’ extended families perished in the Holocaust. The Schors had two daughters born in New York City: artist and writer Mira Schor and scholar of French literature and feminist theory, Naomi Schor. Mrs. Schor exhibited her paintings in New York City in the 1950s under the name Resia Ain; she also studied silversmithing with her husband.

After Ilya Schor’s death in 1961, Resia Schor worked exclusively in metal, creating one of a kind jewelry and Judaica, as well as multi-media sculptures, all in a bold modernist abstract style with a painterly feel for color and texture.

The noted poet Richard Howard wrote of Schor’s work: “…the underlying signification … that Resia Schor has undertaken all along. If I had to find a single word for it, I should choose process, the continuous process of growth and change which we recognize in all plant forms and which we cannot dissect or paralyze to any purpose by “realism”.

She exhibited her works in solo exhibitions at the Arras Gallery in New York City, The East End Gallery in Provincetown, MA, and The Benson Gallery in Bridgehampton, New York. In the 1980s and 1990s, her work was included in group exhibitions at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum (PAAM) and in the exhibition Family, at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museumin Connecticut. In the late 1960s and the 1970s, her work was included in exhibitions including “The Women’s Art Symposium,” Turman Gallery, Indiana State University,” Made in Metal,” The Junior Art Gallery, Louisville, KY, “National Jewelry Exhibition by Outstanding Contemporary American Artist–Craftsmen,” Lawrence University, Appleton, WI, “First Survey of Contemporary American Crafts,” The University Art Museum, The University of Texas, Austin, and “Crafts Invitational,” The Gallery of the Maryland Institute, Baltimore, MD.

In 1969, the musicians of the orchestra of the New York Philharmonic commissioned a mezuzah by Resia Schor as their farewell gift to Leonard Bernstein. An exhibition “Mezuzot by Resia Schor” was held at Yeshiva University Museum in New York City in 2000.

Ilya Schor

Ilya Schor
(1904-1961)

Chronology
1904: Ilya Schor is born as Izrael Schor in Zloczow (Galicia), in the Austro-Hungarian Empire, later Poland (now the Ukraine) to Naftali Schor, a Hasidic folk artist, and his wife, Krajdla.

1920: Ilya is apprenticed to an engraver and learns skills in metalwork and engraving that he will utilize for the rest of his life.

1928: Ilya begins his studies in painting at the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts1930: Ilya meets Resia Schor when Resia applies to and is enrolled at the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts.

1936: Ilya graduates from the Academy of Fine Arts.

1937: Ilya is awarded a grant by the Polish government to study in Paris and Italy. He arrives in Paris in April. He works for one of his professors on a large mural at the Polish Pavilion at the World’s Fair in Paris in 1937. When the project is complete his professor advises him to stay in Paris because there are few opportunities for a Jewish artist in Poland.

1938: Ilya exhibits in the Salon d’Automne, Paris. Though an unknown, his work is singled out for a positive review.

1938: Although unmarried, Ilya and Resia live together in Paris in a top floor garret at 10 Rue Charlot in the Marais, a Jewish quarter of Paris.

1938: As aliens in France, Ilya and Resia cannot get married in a civil ceremony but they marry in a religious ceremony, not legally recognized by French law. After Germany’s invasion of Poland in September, they are granted resident status and they marry in a civil ceremony in Paris. Ilya participates in Salon d’Automne, Paris.

1938: At Resia’s insistence, Ilya and his spouse flee to Paris in late May, just ahead of advancing German troops. They head towards Bordeaux to reunite with friends working for the Joint Distribution Committee who had evacuated Paris earlier. Ilya and Resia are the only survivors of the group of about eleven friends, all Polish Jews, who fled Paris together. They settle in Marseilles to wait for immigration visas to America. Ilya is interned twice by Vichy forces.

1941: Ilya and Resia arrive in New York City via Lisbon, December 3. They settle on the Upper West Side of Manhattan.

1941-1943: Resia works with other recent refugee intellectuals and artists in a small garment factory producing hand-painted tiles.

1944: Exhibition of Gouaches by Ilya Schor: Compositions, Flowers, Landscapes, Still Life, March, 58th Street Branch, New York Public Library. October 10, daughter Naomi is born in New York City.

1944: Ilya exhibits work in a group exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Boston.

1947: Ilya Schor: Paintings on Yiddish Themes, April 19 to May 25, Gallery of Jewish Art, New York. Ilya’s work is included in the inaugural exhibition of The Jewish Museum in its home in the former Warburg mansion on Fifth Avenue, The Giving of the Law and the Ten Commandments, May. The Schors travel to Los Angeles to visit the family of his late half-brother, Abraham Schor. Ilya’s work is included in the United Jewish Welfare fund’s Artfair, Los Angeles, CA. December 29, Ilya and Resia Schor become Naturalized Citizens of the United States.

1949: Ilya Schor’s work is included in The One Hundred and Forty-Fourth Annual Exhibition of the Painting and Sculpture, January 23-February 27, The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, Philadelphia.

1950: Publication of Abraham Joshua Heschel’s The Earth Is the Lord’s: The Inner World of the Jew in Eastern Europe, with wood-engraving illustrations by Ilya Schor; Ilya Schor, Jewish Artists, 1950: Annual Exhibition, Congress for Jewish culture, Jewish Museum, NYC. June 1, daughter Mira is born in New York City.

1951: Publication of Abraham J. Heschel’s The Sabbath: Its Meaning for Modern Man, with wood-engraving illustrations by Ilya Schor; publication of Hillel: The Book Against the Sword, by Ely E. Pilchick, with illustrations by Ilya Schor.

1953: Ilya Schor, Oils, Gouaches, February 2-14, Harry Salpeter Gallery; Group exhibition, 34 Jewish Artists, May, Sea Isle Museum of Contemporary Art, Miami Beach. Publication of Adventures of Mottel the Cantor’s Son, by Sholem Aleichem, with wood engraving illustrations by Ilya Schor. Instillation of Torah Crown and Breastplates, Congregation Emanu-el B’ne Jeshurun, Milwaukee, WI.

1954: Drawings and Prints by Jewish Artists, November-December, Congress for Jewish Culture Art Center, New York City.

1956: Ilya Schor, Six American Sculptors, Arts Club of Chicago; May 11, Dedication of Ilya Schor’s The Doors of the 36, Temple Beth-El of Great Neck, New York.

1957: Ilya Schor, Art in Judaism – Past and Present, Newark Museum; April 17, Dedication for New Torah Ornaments by Ilya Schor, Temple Israel, Boston, MA. After summers spent in Sayville, NY, Rockport, MA, and Woodstock, NY, the Schors spend their first summer in Provincetown, MA.

1958: Ilya Schor’s work is included in Gods and the Man in Art, The American Federation of Arts: patron Robert Trubek commissions a bracelet and pendant by Ilya Schor as a gift to The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The Schors return to Europe for the first time since World War II and spend the summer with Mira and Naomi in Paris and travel to Italy.

1959: Ilya Schor included in several group exhibitions at the HCE Gallery, Provincetown, including the second annual sculpture exhibition, August 6, and Six American Sculptors, Milwaukee Arts Center.

1960: Ilya Schor is included in Liturgical Art, Arts Club of Chicago, and group exhibitions including the third annual sculpture exhibition (July 28), HCE Gallery, Provincetown.

1961: Ilya Schor dies in New York, June 7, at 57. His work is included in International Exhibition of Modern Jewelry 1819-1961, October 26-December 2, Victoria and Albert Museum, and Wood Engravings by Ilya Schor, December 3-18, Newark YM-WYHA, Newark, NJ.

1962: Wood Engravings by Ilya Schor, July-August, Temple of Aaron, St. Paul, MN and YMHA of Bergen County, January 14-February 2, Hackensak, NJ.

1963: Ilya Schor Memorial Exhibition, April, Harz ion Temple, Philadelphia, PA.

1965: Ilya Schor, Retrospective Exhibition, July 8-September 12, The Jewish Museum, New York, NY.

1975: Life of the Old Jewish Shtel: Paintings and Silver by Ilya Schor, Yeshiva University Museum, New York.

2000: Ilya Schor and His Great Neck Patrons, Elsie K. Rudin Judaica Museum, Great Neck, NY.

2002: Family, group exhibition including work by Ilya, Resia, and Mira Schor, Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, CT.

2003: Group exhibition with Mira Schor, My Mother Is and Artist, the educational Alliance, curated by Sheila Pepe. Mira Schor, The Tale of the Goldsmith’s Floor, is produced for the 2003 Brown University and differences Conference, “The Lure of the Detail,” in honor of Naomi Schor, and also shown at the Fine Arts Work Center and at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum, August 2003.

2008: Works by Ilya, Resia, and Mira Schor included in The Studio Show, Provincetown Art Association and Museum; Ilya Schor is reburied with Resia in Provincetown.

Selected Collections
The Jerusalem Great Synagogue, Jacob and Belle Rosenbaum Mezuzah Collection
The Jewish Center, Cracow, Portland
The Jewish Museum, New York City
Metropolitan Museum of Art
North Carolina Museum of Art
Sydney Jewish Museum, Sydney, Australia
Temple Beth-El and Elise K. Rudin Judaica Museum, Great, New York
Temple Israel, Brookline, MA
The Washington Hebrew Congregation, Washington, DC
Private Collections

Biography
lya Schor
 (16 April 1904, Zloczow – 7 June 1961, New York City) was a multi-faceted artist, a painter, jeweler, engraver, sculptor, and renowned artist of Judaica.

Ilya Schor was born in Zloczow (Galicia), in the Austrian Empire, later Poland, in 1904. He came from a deeply Hasidic family. His father Naftali Schorr was a folk-artist, painting colorfully illustrated store signs for local merchants. Ilya Schor first trained as an apprentice in metal crafts and engraving before enrolling at the Warsaw Academy of Fine Arts in 1930 where he studied painting. In 1937, he was awarded a grant by the Polish government to study in Paris. He exhibited successfully at the Salon d’Automne in 1938. Ilya Schor and his artist wife Resia Schor immigrated to the United States in December, 1941, from Marseilles, via Lisbon, after fleeing Paris in late May 1940. Ilya Schor and Resia Schor had two daughters, born in New York City: artist and writer Mira Schor (b. 1950) and noted literary scholar and theorist, Naomi Schor (1943–2001).

In New York City, Ilya Schor began artwork that would keep fresh his memories of life of the Jews of Eastern Europe, working in the many materials and with the numerous skills at his disposal. He worked on major commissions for synagogues in the United States. Schor’s wood-engraving illustrations for The Earth is The Lord’s and The Sabbath, both important writings by the renowned philosopher and theologian, Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel, and for Adventures of Mottel The Cantor’s Son by Sholem Aleichem, have remained in print for over fifty years. Rabbi Heschel wrote of Schor’s work, “In the stillness of the precious images Ilya Schor has called into being, generations to come will hear the voice and the spirit of eternal Israel, the inwardness and piety of our people of Eastern Europe.” Schor was also the creator of unique jewelry and small Judaica objects in silver and gold. In later years he also worked on abstract sculptures in brass and copper.

His work was exhibited at The Salpeter Gallery in New York 1953, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Boston, and the Jewish Museum (New York), 1948, and was included in group exhibitions such as Liturgical Art, Arts Club of Chicago and at the HCE Gallery, Provincetown MA, 1959 and 60; Six American Sculptors, Milwaukee Arts Center; Art in Judaism – Past and Present, Newark Museum, 1957; Six American Sculptors, Arts Club of Chicago, 1956.

Ilya Schor died in New York City in 1961. A retrospective of his work was held at the Jewish Museum (New York) in 1965. Another smaller exhibition of works in varied media, “Life of the Old Jewish Shtetl: Paintings and Silver by Ilya Schor,” was held at Yeshiva University Museum in 1975. His works are included in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Jewish Museum (New York), The Jerusalem Great Synagogue Jacob and Belle Rosenbaum Mezuzah Collection, North Carolina Museum of Art, and Sydney Jewish Museum, Sydney, Australia.

Philip Malicoat

Philip Malicoat
(1908-1981)

Education:
John Heron Art Institute
Cape Cod School of Art, with Charles Hawthorne, Henry Hensche, and with Edwin Dickinson

Exhibitions:
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, 1933
Corcoran Gallery of Art, 1935, 1937, 1939
National Academy of Design, 1936, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1954
Art Institute of Chicago, 1941
Philadelphia Watercolor Club
Institute of Modern Art, Boston, 1939
Provincetown Art Association and Museum
Art USA, New York, 1959
Cape Museum of Fine Arts

Collections:
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
Chrysler Museum of Art
Cape Museum of Fine Arts
Provincetown Art Association and Museum

Biography:
Known for his scenes of Provincetown, Massachusetts and surrounding area, especially atmospheric seascapes, Philip Malicoat settled in Provincetown, where he had first gone as a student of Charles Hawthorne with whom he had first studied at the John Herron Institute in Indianapolis.

Accoarding to Malicoat, Hawthorne had a big reputation and came to the Herron Institute on one of his many tours around the country to give demonstration classes. He was a very positive, encouraging and upbeat teacher and demanding but not overtly demanding. Malicoat then painted with him at Provincetown. Of this experience, he said: “You always came out of his class wanting to get right going again, because there was plenty of room to get better. Besides, on the weekend we usually scrapped down our old canvases that we used all week and repaint them, so we’d be ready for Monday.”

Students of Hawthorne were a big part of the population there. “You could go down the street in the evenings before the summer was over and know practically everybody. There weren’t many tourists in town.”

There were older, established artists there, and Malicoat spent his first winter in Provincetown in 1931. He was a member of the Beachcombers, a social group where he hobnobbed with the other artists including Gerrit Beneker, Edwin Dickinson, William Paxton, Karl Knaths, Ross Moffett, and Coulton and Frederick Waugh.

Malicoat was born in Indianapolis and there attended the John Herron Art Institute from 1928 to 1929. Following that period, he studied at Provincetown with Charles Hawthorne and also Henry Hensche at their Cape Cod School of Art and, staying on, became a trustee of the Provincetown Art Association.

He was also active at Woodstock, New York, and exhibited with the Woodstock Art Association. Other exhibition venues included the Corcoran Gallery, the National Academy of Design, and the Art Institute of Chicago.

Early in his career, he painted in both watercolor and oil, but from the 1950s, used only oil paint.

Michael Loew

Michael Loew
1907-1985

Loew-cropped

Education:
Art Students League, 1926-1929
Academie Scandinave, Paris, 1930
Hans Hofmann School of Fine Arts, 1947-1949
Atelier Leger, Paris, 1950
Orthon Frieze, Paris

Selected Solo Exhibitions:
1949                             Artists Gallery, New York City
1956                             Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine
1959                             T.K. Gallery Provincetown, MA
1959, 57, 55, 53          Rose Fried Gallery, New York City
1959                             Two Man Show, Loew & McNeil, Rutgers University
1960                             Holland Goldowski Gallery, Chicago, Illinois
1965, 62, 61                 Stable Gallery, New York City
1966, 60                       University of California, Berkeley
1976, 73                       Landmark Gallery, New York City
1984, 82, 81 ,79, 77    Marilyn Pearl Gallery, New York City
1986                             Marilyn Pearl Gallery, Memorial Exhibition, New York City
1987                             Paintings from the Eighties, Marilyn Pearl Gallery, New York City
1989                             Michael Loew: Early Work, 1929-1955, Marilyn Pearl Gallery, New York City
1990                             Michael Loew: Serene Genius in Retrospect, Landau Fine Art, Montreal, Canada
1997                             Monhegan Island Museum, Monhegan, Maine
1997                             Farnsworth Museum, Rockland Maine
2005                             Towards Geometric Abstraction, Acme Fine Art Gallery, Boston, MA
2008                             Michael Loew: En Plein Air, Acme Fine Art Gallery, Boston, MA
2009                             Works on Paper from the 1940s and 1950s, Meredith Ward Fine Art Gallery, New York City

Selected Group Exhibitions:
1950                             New England Painters, Farnsworth Museum
1950                             Painting Annual, Whitney Museum, New York City
1950                             American Abstract Artists Exhibition, Paris, Copenhagen, Amsterdam
1951-56                       New York Artists Annual, Stable Gallery, New York City
1952                             American Watercolors, Drawings, Prints, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City
1953                             The Classic Tradition in American Painting, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN
1955                             Glarner, Loew, Yunkers and Vincente, Rose Fried Gallery, New York City
1955                             Four Man Show, Rutgers University
1957                             Contemporary American Painting, International Association of Plastic Arts, Traveling exhibition
1957                             Collage in America, Zabriksie Gallery, New York City
1958                             Collage in America, American Federation of Arts, Traveling exhibition
1959                             Loew & McNeil, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ
1959                             Art USA, NY Coliseum
1960                             The Calculated Image, Morgan State College
1961                             Painting Annual, Whitney Museum, New York City
1961                             Contemporary Painting from 1960-61, Yale Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut
1962                             Geometric Abstraction in America, Whitney Museum, New York City
1963                             Hans Hofmann and his Students, Museum of Modern Art, NY, Traveling exhibition
1964                             67TH Annual American Exhibition, Art Institute of Chicago
1965                             Maine: 50 Artists of the 20th Century, American Federation of Arts, Traveling exhibition
1966                             American Painting and Sculpture, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia
1967                             Selection 1967: Recent Acquisitions in Modern Art, University of California, Berkeley
1971                             The Ciba-Geigy Collection, Hudson River Museum, Yonkers, New York
1973                             The Ciba-Geigy Collection, University of Texas, Austin
1975                             American Abstract Painting 1939-75, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York City
1976                             Works on Paper, Museum Art Center, Wichita Falls, Texas
1977                             New Deal Art, The Gallery Association of New York State, Traveling exhibition
1977                             Works on Paper from the Ciba-Geigy Collection, Neuberger Museum, State University of New York
1977                             Geometric Abstraction: Paintings of the Fifties, Marilyn Pearl Gallery, New York City
1977                             Selections from the Lawrence H. Bloedel Bequest, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York City
1978-79                       Geometric Abstractions and Related Works, Newark Museum, Newark, New Jersey
1979                             The Language of Abstraction, Betty Parsons Gallery and Marilyn Pearl Gallery, New York City
1980                             The Dawn of a New Day: New York World’s Fair 1939-40, Queens Museum, Flushing, New York
1980                             The Geometric Tradition in American Painting, Marilyn Pearl Gallery, New York City
1981                             American Abstract Artists: Abstraction in Action, City Gallery, New York City
1981                             American Artists in the Gallatin Collection, Washburn Gallery, New York City
1981                             Aspects of Abstraction, Rice University, Houston, Texas
1981                             Annual 118th Artists Invitational, Landmark Gallery, New York City
1982                             Hans Hoffman as a Teacher: Drawings by Hans Hoffman and Students, American Federation of Arts
1983                             Vintage New York, Contemporary Art at One Penn Plaza, New York City
1983                             Paintings of the Fifties, Marilyn Pearl Gallery, New York City
1983-84                       Twentieth-Century American Watercolor, Gallery Association of New York State
1984                             Maine Drawing Biennial, Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine
1984                             American Post-War Purism, Marilyn Pearl Gallery, New York City
1985                             The Severe & the Romantic: Geometric Humanism in American Painting, the 1950’s and the 1960’s
1985                             Marilyn Pearl Gallery, New York City
1985                             Crossovers, Suzanna Usdan Gallery, Bennington College, Bennington, Vermont
1985                             Abstractions, Maine Coast Artists, Rockport, Maine
1987                             Looking at the WPA: Mural sketches and Other Works from the 1930’s, Marilyn Pearl Gallery, NYC
1987                             Recent Acquisitions, Guggenheim Museum, New York City
1988                             American Art of the Nineteen-Thirties, Bronx Museum of the Arts, Satellite Gallery, Bronx, New York
1989                             Straphangers, Whitney Museum of American Art at Phillip Morris, New York City
1989                             Abstraction, Geometry, Painting: Selected Geometric Abstract Painting in America Since 1945
1989                             Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York
1997                             Artists of the 50’s, Anita Shapolsky Gallery, New York City
1998                             Ernest Briggs & Michael Loew, Anita Shapolsky Gallery, New York City
1999                             Loew & 4 others, Anita Shapolsky Gallery, New York City
1999                             Loew & Artists of the 50’s, Anita Shapolsky Gallery, New York City
1999                             Development of Abstraction (continued), Anita Shapolsky Gallery, New York City
2000                             Maine and the Modern Spirit, Katonah Museum, Katonah, New York
2000                             Art for Art’s Sake, Credo of the 50’s, Anita Shapolsky Gallery, New York City
2001                             Group Show, Anita Shapolsky Gallery, NYC
2005                             Pioneers of Modernism, Acme Fine Art Gallery, Boston, MA
2006                             Geometry and Abstraction, Acme Fine Art Gallery, Boston, MA
2007                             Maine Modern Two, Acme Fine Art Gallery, Boston, MA
2012                             Provincetown Views, Acme Fine Art Gallery, Boston, MA

Selected Collections:
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York City
Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, Dallas, TX
Detroit Institute of Art, Detroit, MI
Whitney Museum of American Art
Philadelphia Museum of Art, Gallatin Collection
Portland Museum of Art, Portland, ME
Sheldon Memorial Museum, Lincoln, NE
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC
Carnegie Institute Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, PA
Albright Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY
Hampton Institute, Virginia
Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Humlebaek, Denmark
Tel Aviv Museum, Israel
Philadelphia Museum, Philadelphia, PA
University of St. Lawrence, Canton, NY
University Art Museum, University of California, Berkely, CA
Gallery of Contemporary Art, University of Atlanta, GA
Wichita State University, Wichita Falls KS
Birla Academy of Art & Culture, Calcutta, India
Ciba-Geigy Corporation, NY
Union Carbide, New York City
Lehman Brothers, New York City
Carona-Mass, Publications, MA
Southeast Banking Corp., Miami, FL
Chemical Bank, New York City
Monhegan Island Maine Museum, ME
Farnsworth Museum, Rockland, ME
Anita Shapolsky Gallery, New York City
John Day, ME
William & Elaine De Kooning
Werner & Gabrielle Merzbacher, Switzerland
Robert Landau, Montreal, Canada
Rosalie & Remsen Wood, Baltimore, MD

Awards and Fellowships:
Sadie A. May Fellowship, 1929
Commission for Hall of Pharmacy, New York World’s Fair with Willem de Kooning, 1939-1940
Honorable Mention (twice in succession), National Mural Competition of U.S. Treasury Department, 1941, 1942
Commissioned by Treasury Department to paint murals for post offices in Amherst, Ohio, and Belle Vernon, PA, 1941, 1942
Ford Foundation Purchase, 1964
National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship Grant, 1976
Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship, 1979
Judith Rothschild Grant, 1997

Teaching Positions:
Portland Museum School, Portland, Oregon, Visiting Professor, 1945-1957
University of California, Berkeley, Guest Artist, 1960, 1966
School of the Visual Arts, New York City, 1958-1985

Biography:
Michael Loew was born in 1907 and was the son of a New York City baker.  After high school, he was an apprentice to a stained-glass maker, and from 1926-1929, he studied at the Art Student’s League.

In 1929, he traveled to Paris, North Africa, Germany, and Italy with a group of artists, including Max Schnitzler and Alfred Jensen.  When he returned to New York City in 1931, the Great Depression hit Loew unexpectedly, and for the next two years he paid his apartment rent with his paintings.  In 1935, he found work with the WPA where he painted murals and partnered up with longtime friend Willem de Kooning in 1939 on a mural for the Hall of Pharmacy at the New York World’s Fair.  Their friendship lasted for the rest of their lives and, in fact, Loew met his wife Mildred through a friend of de Kooning’s.

Loew had a strong interest in artists’ rights and activism, and as president of the Artists’ Union, he led a protest which involved artists chaining themselves to poles in Union Square.  After Pearl Harbor, Loew joined the Navy and served as the battalion artist for the “Seabees” in the Pacific.

When he returned in 1946, his painting moved quickly toward abstraction.  From 1947-1949, he studied post-Cubism at the Hans Hofmann School of Fine Arts.  In 1948, he joined the Spiral Group, an organization of artists devoted to the exhibition of experimental art.  The Artists Gallery in New York hosted his first one-man show in 1949, and one year later, he enrolled at the Atelier Leger in Paris.

In 1956, he began teaching in the United States.  By 1985 he had been an instructor at the Portland Museum School, University of California at Berkeley, and the School of the Visual Arts, NYC.

His works are in the collections of prominent institutions such as the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Guggenheim Museum, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Most recently, his work was featured in an exhibit at Anita Shapolsky Gallery. In 2007 the McCormick Gallery and Vincent Vallarino Fine Art mounted an exhibition and published a 56 page catalog with an essay by April Kingsley on Loew’s work.

Sharli Powers Land

Sharli Powers Land

Sharli Powers Land
(February 23, 1942 – August 5, 1994)

Selected Exhibitions
One and Two Person:
Art Up Front, Cambridge, MA 1980
Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown 1978
Fine Arts Work Center, Provincetown, MA 1970-1978
Fine Arts Work Center, Provincetown, MA 2012

Group Shows:
Boston International Fine Art Show, Acme Fine Art, Boston, MA 2013
Provincetown Views, Acme Fine Art Gallery, Boston, MA 2012
Beyond Bard, National Arts Club, Marquis & Gregg Galleries, NY, NY 1994
Art at the Armory, Philadelphia, PA 1992
Northwest Yearly Meeting Internat’l Artshow, George Fox College,Newberg, OR 1989
Long Point Gallery, Wellfleet, MA 1980
Cove Gallery, Wellfleet, MA 1979
Parsons School of Design, NY, NY 1978
Boston Visual Arts Union, Boston, MA 1978
The Arwin Galleries, Detroit, MI 1977-1978
Cummington Community of the Arts, Cummington, MA 1976-1980
Piano Craft Guild, Boston, MA 1976
Keene State College, Keene, NH 1975
Rockland Center for the Arts, Nyack, NY 1975
Judy Baer, Arlington, VA 1975-1980
Numerous private collections

Publications
Queen of Suffering, cover art, 1985
“Working Undercover”, in Heresies: A Feminist Publication on Art and Politics 1979
American Artist, The Joy of Painting, “The Art Community: Haven and Inspiration” 1979
Covers, a satirical mail order catalog co-authored with Martha Fowlkes 1978

Awards
Cummington Community of the Arts, Cummington, MA, scholarship
Fine Arts Work Center, Provincetown, MA, two year fellowship, 1969-1971
Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Skowhegan, ME, scholarship

Teaching
Provincetown Adult Education Oil Painting 1978-1979
Lower Cape Arts Council, Artist in the Schools 1978-1979
Massachusetts College of Art and Project, Inc., Landscape Drawing
Rhode Island School of Design Summer Program, Figure Drawing 1976

Education
B.A. Sarah Lawrence College, 1964
Bard College, 1960-1962

Professional Training
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, PA, mixed-media sculpture
Massachusetts College of Art, Boston, MA, production and lay-out techniques
Boston University, Boston, MA, art therapy
New York University, NY, NY, education courses
New York Studio School, NY, NY

Organizations/Employment
Bow and Arrow Stove Company, Cambridge, MA, drawings for advertisements 1980
Fine Arts Works Center, Provincetown, MA, Chair, Visual Arts Department 1976-1978
Fine Arts Work Center, Provincetown, MA, Board of Directors 1971-1978
Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, MA, Trustee 1975-1976

Biography
Artist Sharli Powers Land (1942-’94), once of Provincetown, Cambridge and Philadelphia, died too young, leaving behind her children, a beloved husband, throngs of bereft friends and a brilliant legacy of drawings and paintings spanning some 30 years.

This year marks the 70th anniversary of her birth and, in celebration of her life, her art and her contribution to the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, her family has staged an exhibition of her paintings, drawings and works on paper completed during her time here. Powers Land was a FAWC fellow in 1969-’70 and 1970-’71. From 1971-78, she served on the board of trustees and was visual arts coordinator of the fellowship program. Her commemorative exhibit opened on June 15 at in the Hudson D. Walker Gallery at the Fine Arts Work Center, 24 Pearl St., Provincetown, and runs through July 8.
“I’ve wanted to have a show for my mother for many years but life always seemed too busy,” says Powers Land’s daughter Sharli Sunshine Polanco. “I felt it was time to celebrate as she would have wanted. She always had a show in our house in Philadelphia on her birthday, so this is just an extension of that.”
The family invited Frank Egloff, himself a former fellow from the early 1970s and a longtime friend to curate the show. He selected mostly ink-on-paper drawings, pieces that spoke to him. Polanco adds, “These works are from her time on the Cape because we all thought it important that there should be a connection with the people and the place where the show is being held. The idea is to sell the work and remind people or acquaint [newcomers] with her work. So much work is in storage and I would rather it be on walls where it can be enjoyed. As far as I know, that was my mother’s philosophy as well.”
Sunshine and her older brother Jonas were just young kids during the Provincetown years, but they share certain memories that mirror the joy that their mother’s Cape friends still hold for that time. “It was great having an artist for a mom,” Jonas says. “She was home while we were children. It felt secure to know that she was there and that she was painting. My time in Provincetown and the Cape in general shaped my ideas and ideals about how and where one should live. I remember childhood swims in the ponds, bay and ocean. I remember tooling around the bay with Brandon Milby and friends in a dory made by a friend’s father. I remember amazing picnics where the grownups frolicked and the kids kept pace. I remember ice-skating on the frozen ponds, potluck dinners at FAWC, gardens with food, friends just down the street, selling the Advocate in the [only] two dead-of-winter open bars. I have fond memories of raising hell as a teenager and never feeling like we were not part of a close community. I feel lucky to have had an amazing family, both immediate and extended and spending my childhood in such an amazing place.”
Sunshine adds a humorous touch to her reminiscence: “Life with a mother as an artist meant having to attend the world’s most boring event to a four-year-old — the art opening. Always cheese, crackers and wine. I’ll be bringing juice to this opening so my kids will have something to drink.” In a more serious tone she adds, “It meant parties where ideas were discussed; it meant that whenever my brother or I were sick she would paint us because she knew it was the only time we would stay still. It meant seeing her rejected for shows and still keep painting. It meant painting the interior of every house we ever lived in and having the furniture rearranged every few months. It meant growing up with real original works of art all around us. I did not get any of her artistic gifts except to see the possibilities for materials that others might throw away. To this day I cannot see a cardboard insert in a t-shirt pack without wanting to draw on it. My mother used everything and anything she could get her hands on.”
The opening reception at FAWC was a true reunion, a homecoming celebration of sorts. Poet Keith Althaus captured the essence of this remarkable artist and friend, noting that, “This exhibit is an occasion for joy. For those who knew Sharli Land’s work before, I think this show will confirm their original high opinion of it. And to those to whom it serves as an introduction, may they experience that keen pleasure that comes only at the discovery of a genuine talent. It’s hard because it’s natural, but we shouldn’t lament that one person’s art is cramped into so small a space, so short a time.”

Panos Ghikas

Panos Ghikas
(1924-2012)

Education:
Yale School of Art, B.F.A., M.F.A.
Fulbright Fellowship study with Willi Baumeister at the Akademie Der Bildenden Kunste, Stutgart, Germany

Awards:
Yale Norfolk Fellowships
Fulbright Fellowship, Germany
MacDowell Colony Fellowship
Blanche E. Colman Foundation Grant

Teaching Positions:
Rhode Island School of Design
Brown University
Massachusetts College of Art
Phillips Academy
Bowdoin College
Museum School of Fine Arts
Washington University School of Fine Arts, Saint Louis, MO
Visiting artist at University of New Hampshire
Carpenter Center for Visual Arts, Harvard University

Selected Exhibitions:
Margaret Brown Gallery, Boston (solo)
Kanegis Gallery, Boston (solo)
Joan Peterson Gallery, Boston (solo)
Radcliffe College, Hilles Library, Cambridge, MA (solo)
Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME (solo)
Institute of Contemporary Art
Chicago Art Institute, “Abstract and Surrealist Show”
International Salon Des Realities Nouvelle, Paris “Biennial of American Watercolor Painting”
Worcester Museum, MA, “Biennial of Contemporary American Painting”
Yale University Art Gallery, “Drawings of Modern Masters”
Whitney Museum, NY, “Annual of American Painting”
Whitney Museum, NY, “Fulbright Painters”
University of Illinois, “American Painting Annual”
George Binet Gallery, NY, “Young Talents”
Nordness Gallery, NY, “Artists at Work”
Pace Gallery, Boston
Washington University, Saint Louis, MO, “Faculty Exhibition”
Northeastern University, “New England Contemporary Painting”
Carpenter Center, Harvard University, “CRIA Show”
Museum of Fine Art, Rhode Island School of Design, “Faculty Exhibition”
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston “Transition”
Selected Collections:
Walker Art Museum, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME
Colby College Art Museum, Waterville, ME
New Britain Museum of American Art, New Britain, CT
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Publications and Commissions:
Restoration of Barry Faulkner Murals, Keene State College
Arden House, Columbia University
Commission for World Trade Center, 1976, gold leaf wall relief (7×15’)
Gilded spheres for Warren Platner’s home in New Haven, CT

Maurice Freedman

(1904-1985)

Education:
School of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Massachusetts College of Art
Art students League of New York

Exhibitions: 
Midtown Gallery, New York, 1934 (solo)
Cape Museum of Fine Arts (solo)
Hudson River Museum (solo)
Washington University Gallery of Art (solo)
D. Wigmore Fine Art (solo)
Metropolitan Museum of Art
Carnegie Institute
Whitney Museum of American Art
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art
Art institute of Chicago
Corcoran Gallery
Brooklyn Museum
Walker Art center
Toledo Museum
 

Collections:
National Museum of American Art
Smithsonian Institution
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts
Denver Art Museum
Butler Institute of American Art
City Art Museum of St. Louis
Milwaukee Art Institute
Los Angeles Art Museum
Minneapolis Institute of Art
La Jolla Museum

Maurice Freedman was born in Dorchester, a suburb of Boston, and educated at the School of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts College of Art, and the Art Students League of New York. His work has been exhibited at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Carnegie Institute, Whitney Museum of American Art, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, Art institute of Chicago, Corcoran Gallery, Brooklyn Museum, Walker Art Center, and Toledo Museum. His work is in the collections of the National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Denver Art Museum, Butler Institute of American Art, City Art Museum of St. Louis, Milwaukee Art Institute, Los Angeles Art Museum, and the Minneapolis Institute of Art.

 

Selected reviews:

“There are Freedman paintings that deserve to go straight into any history of American Paintings in this century.” (Midtown Galleries Exhibit) —John Russell, The New York Times, 1982

Every so often you come across an artist whose work is so appealing and so accomplished that you wonder how it could have slipped under your radar. One example is Maurice Freedman (1904-85). —Ken Johnson, The New York Times, 2004, FREEDMAN TRIBUTE SHOWS MASTER AT WORK

“American modernist Maurice Freedman is significant enough to be mentioned in the same breath as other modernist masters working on the cusp of abstraction and reality, such as Marsden Hartley, Arthur Dove, John Marin and Milton Avery.” —Andre van der Wende, Cape Cod Times, 2004

“Freedman’s brush is bold and so is his color.” —Time Magazine

“His paintings are filled with subtle inflections and rich suggestiveness… The sensuousness off his paint handling defines his bold and striking images and therein lie the seeds of modernism.  In this was Freedman helped set the stage for all that was yet to come.” —Mary Sherman, Curator, Cape Cod Museum of Art, 2004

“America is lucky to have Maurice Freedman” —Max Beckmann

“Freedman’s oeuvre is remarkable.” —B. Blomienk, Director, Guggenheim & L’Hermitage Museum, NV

“In his handling of paint and in the purification of his perceptions all caviling about what “place” he occupies is irrelevant.  The recent paintings of bays and seascapes are proof enough of his individual vision of the world as he sees it.” —Arts Magazine

“Freedman is moving toward a massive poetic simplicity of structure in his evocations of sea and cloud and shore.” —Pictures on Exhibit

Gilbert Franklin

GILBERT FRANKLIN
(1919-2004)

Gil Franklin portrait

EDUCATION

1948-49      American Academy in Rome, Italy
1941-46      B.F.A. Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, RI
1942            Museo Nacional, Mexico City, Mexico
1938            Hawthorne School of Art, Provincetown, MA

SELECTED COLLECTIONS

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA
Miami University, Oxford, OH
Corcoran Gallery, Washington, DC
RISD Museum of Art, Providence, RI
Boston Safe Deposit and Trust Company, Boston, MA
Currier Museum of Art, Manchester, NH
Hopkins Center for the Arts – Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
Newport Art Museum, Newport, RI
Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY
Providence Art Club, Providence, RI
Provincetown Arts Association and Museum, Provincetown, MA
National Academy Museum, New York, NY
Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC
Hood Museum of Art – Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH

SELECTED SOLO & GROUP EXHIBITIONS

2014-15       ACME Fine Art, Boston, MA
2012            Berta Walker Gallery, Provincetown, MA
2010            Provincetown Art Association and Museum, Provincetown, MA
2009            Berta Walker Gallery, Provincetown, MA
2005            Berta Walker Gallery, Provincetown, MA
2004            Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site, Cornish, NH
1991-94      Long Point Gallery, Provincetown, MA
1958            Boston Fine Arts Festival, Boston, MA
1950            Whitney Annual, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY
1941            Providence Art Club, Providence, RI

SELECTED PUBLIC INSTALLATIONS & COMMISSIONS

2004            Polytropus, Rev. Dom Peter Sidler Memorial, Portsmouth Abbey School, Portsmouth, RI
1993            Seaforms, marble, Wellfleet Public Library, Wellfleet, MA
1991            Two bas-reliefs, U.S. Navy War Memorial, Washington, DC
1988            St. Gregory, Portsmouth Abbey School, Portsmouth, RI
1988            Conversation, Gannett Building, Arlington, VA
1981            Bather (Diana), Fountain, Hallmark Collection, Kansas City, MO
1976            Harry S. Truman, Memorial, Independence, MO
1973            Veritas Eternaliter Juvenis, Providence College, Providence, RI
1968            Daybreak, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, RI
1963            Orpheus Ascending, Fountain, Frazier Memorial, Providence, RI
1958            Abraham Lincoln, Harvey Trust, Roger Williams Park, Providence, RI
Rhode Island Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts, Providence, RI
The Rhode Island Council Medal, Providence, RI
The Truman Award, Washington, D.C.

AWARDS

2003            The Ella Jackson Chair, Truro Center for the Arts at Castle Hill
1991            Elected Member of the National Academy
1975            Providence Art Club Medal for Excellence in the Arts, Providence, RI
1975            Artist-in-Residence, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH
1965-66      Artist-in-Residence, American Academy in Rome, Italy
1962-63      Artist-in-Residence, American Academy in Rome, Italy
1958            Grand Prize Boston Fine Arts Festival, Boston, MA
1948-49      Prix de Rome in Sculpture, Fellow, American Academy in Rome, Italy
1942            Museo Nacional, Traveling Fellowship, Mexico City, Mexico
1941            Alumni Fellowship, Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, RI

TEACHING

1984            Helen M. Danforth Chair of Fine Arts, RISD, Providence, RI
1975-84      Dean, Division of Fine Arts, RISD, Providence, RI
1960-84      Co-founder and Director of European Honors Program, Rome, Italy
1942-84      Professor, RISD, Providence, RI
1975-76      University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
1960-75      Chair, Division of Fine Arts, RISD, Providence, RI
1953-60      Head of the Sculpture Department, RISD, Providence, RI
1952-53      Yale University, New Haven, CT
1950-51      Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
1946            San Jose State College, San Jose, California

PROFESSIONAL & ACADEMIC BOARDS

ca. 1988-03   Trustee and Chairman, Visual Arts Committee of the Fine Arts Work Center, Provincetown, MA
1980               Appointed to the Board of Overseers, Department of Fine Arts, Boston University, Boston, MA
1975-80         Trustee, American Academy in Rome, Italy
1973-79         Chair, Selection Committee in Sculpture, American Academy in Rome, Italy
1976               Appointed to the Board of Overseers, University of Pennsylvania School of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, PA

BIOGRAPHY

Gilbert Franklin is one of the most significant and influential sculptors of American modernism in the Twentieth-Century. His prolific and impressive career spanned over six decades and included numerous public commissions, group and one-man exhibitions, and teaching positions throughout New England, the Midwest, and abroad.

Franklin was born in Birmingham, England and grew up in Attleboro, Massachusetts. In 1938 he studied painting with John Frazier at the Hawthorne School in Provincetown, Massachusetts. By 1941, he received his B.F.A from the Rhode Island School of Design where he taught from 1942-1984. It was during this period at RISD that he served as Head of the Sculpture Department (1953-60), Chair of the Division of Fine Arts (1960-75), and Dean (1975-84). He was the co-founder of RISD’s European Honors Program and served as Director of that illustrious program for several years. He also served as a visiting professor at Harvard, Yale, and the University of Pennsylvania, among other institutions. Additionally, Franklin served on several professional and academic boards. He was a Trustee of the American Academy in Rome, and served on the Board of Overseers of the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Fine Arts and the School of Fine Arts at Boston University. In 1984 he was named Helen M. Danforth Distinguished Professor of Fine Arts at RISD.

As a sculptor, Franklin worked in granite, marble, wood, and bronze. He was a master of bronze casting and his sculptures ranged from the figurative to the non-representational. As a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome, Franklin connected to the classical traditions of Roman and Greek sculpture; however, the majority of his sculptures tended to convey a modernist aesthetic in their rough surfaces, boldly sliced interacting forms, and sharp edges.

Franklin was the recipient of numerous awards—namely, the Prix de Rome in Sculpture, the Grand Prize at Boston’s Fine Arts Festival, and the Providence Art Club Medal for Excellence in the Arts. He was also an elected member of the National Academy, a Fellow at the American Academy in Rome, and The Ella Jackson Chair at the Truro Center for the Arts at Castle Hill. Additionally, he received many public commissions including: the U.S. Navy Memorial in Washington, D.C.; the Harry S. Truman Memorial in Independence, MO; pieces for the Hallmark Collection in Kansas City, MO; for the Gannett Building, Washington, D.C.; and the Orpheus Ascending Fountain at the Frazier Memorial in Providence, RI, as well as outdoor sculpture, Seaforms, at the Wellfleet Public Library. His final commission was a fourteen foot sculpture in Memory of Rev. Dom Peter Sidler at the Portsmouth Abbey School in Portsmouth, RI.

Franklin’s work is represented in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, The Rhode Island School of Design Museum in Providence, The National Academy Museum in New York, and The Corcoran Gallery and the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. as well as many others. His work has been shown widely both in the U.S. and abroad including, the Whitney Museum of American Art and a major one-man exhibition at Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site in Cornish, NH in 2004. The most recent museum exhibition of Franklin’s sculpture was held at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum in 2010.